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© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Twitter: @drjmetzDesigning HighAvailability in a CiscoConverged Netw...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Agenda• High Availability– How we got here– For FC, for Ethernet, an...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.What is High-Availability (HA)?
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.What is "HA"?• Redundancy
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.What is "HA"?• Redundancy• No Single Points ofFailure– Control andSw...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Why HA?• Switches were small (8-16ports) and not very powerful• Easi...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Why HA?• Meshes were created for addingports and redundancy• Many of...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Why HA?• Moved to high-density, highly-available Director Class syst...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Why HA?• Add separate Fabric• SAN A/B introduced for redundancypurpo...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Best Practices forHigh-AvailabilityEthernet and Fibre Channel:Common...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Best Practices for HA• There are elements common toboth FC and Ether...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Network and Fabric• Ethernet/IP– Goal: Provide any-to-any connectivi...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Network and Fabric• Servers typically dual homed to two or moreacces...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Network and Fabric• Fibre Channel SAN– Transport and Services are on...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Network and Fabric• “Edge-Core” or “Edge-Core-Edge”Topology• Servers...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Best Practices for HA• FC Specific– Air gap redundant fabrics– Multi...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Co-Location• What is it?– Ideally, keeping hosts and storage onsame ...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Best Practices for HA• FC specific - Scale– VE_Ports (ISLs) allowsfo...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Best Practices for HA• HA Elements common toboth FC and Ethernet– Si...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Best Practices for HA• HA Elements common to bothFC and Ethernet– Re...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Best Practices for HA• Ethernet-specific (not used for block I/O)– N...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Best Practices for HA• iSCSI specific (used for block I/O)– Dual Att...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Oh, by the way...Server virtualizationServer virtualization consider...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Isolation and Redundancy$$LessSharingMoreSharingFailure Tolerance
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Isolation and RedundancyLAN SAN
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.From Ethernet POV• How can you maintain Ethernet best practices of H...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.From a Storage POV• . . . while still maintaining FC best practiceso...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.High AvailabilityTopologies
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Application Tiers• How would you categorize your applications tiers ...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Topology 1: No Convergence• Same topologies as existingnetworks, but...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Topology 2 (Converged at ToR)• Consolidated the LAN Access and the S...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Trunking and Channeling• Switches operating in N_Port Virtualization...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Trunking/Channeling with UCS• More flexibility in engineering FC tra...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Topology 3 (Fabric/Completely Converged)• LAN and SAN traffic share ...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.UCS iSCSI and Appliance Port Redundancy• Host Multi-pathing drivers ...
© Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Summary• Highly Available network topologiescontinue to be a require...
Visit Cisco Booth 401• Twitter: @ciscoDC• Facebook.com/CiscoDC• Video: http://www.youtubecisco.com/datacenter• Cisco blog:...
High Availability
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High Availability

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High Availablility presentation from Dr. J Metz from EMC World 2013

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High Availability

  1. 1. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Twitter: @drjmetzDesigning HighAvailability in a CiscoConverged NetworkingEnvironmentJ Metz, Ph.DProduct Manager, Storage, Cisco SystemsCo-Sponsoredby Intel®
  2. 2. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Agenda• High Availability– How we got here– For FC, for Ethernet, and for both– Isolation and Redundancy• HA Topologies– Access-Layer– End-To-End– Future HA Topologies?
  3. 3. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.What is High-Availability (HA)?
  4. 4. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.What is "HA"?• Redundancy
  5. 5. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.What is "HA"?• Redundancy• No Single Points ofFailure– Control andSwitching Elementshave redundantcomponents
  6. 6. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Why HA?• Switches were small (8-16ports) and not very powerful• Easily have an outage• Switch can go downFCSAN(not drawn to scale)
  7. 7. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Why HA?• Meshes were created for addingports and redundancy• Many of the ports (up to half)were being used for ISLsSANFC(not drawn to scale)
  8. 8. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Why HA?• Moved to high-density, highly-available Director Class systems• 80% of storage environments useDirector Class Fibre ChannelSwitches(not drawn to scale)SANFC
  9. 9. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Why HA?• Add separate Fabric• SAN A/B introduced for redundancypurposes• Still have an outage if change controlprocedures are not followed(not drawn to scale)SAN A SAN BFC
  10. 10. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Best Practices forHigh-AvailabilityEthernet and Fibre Channel:Common ElementsFibre Channel HAEthernet Storage HA
  11. 11. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Best Practices for HA• There are elements common toboth FC and Ethernet– Director Class• Redundant control plane,switching, power, and cooling– No single spoke networktopologies• There are specific needs toboth Ethernet and FC
  12. 12. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Network and Fabric• Ethernet/IP– Goal: Provide any-to-any connectivity• Unaware of packet loss (“lossy”) – relies onUpper Layer Protocols (ULPs) for retransmissionand windowing• Provides the transport without worrying about theservices –– Services provided by upper layers• East-west vs. north-south traffic ratios areundefined• Network design has been optimized for– High Availability from a transport perspectiveby connecting nodes in mesh architectures– Service HA is implemented separately– Takes into account control protocol interaction(STP, OSPF, EIGRP, L2/L3 boundary, etc…)????????????Switch SwitchSwitch?Client/Serverrelationships are notpre-defined? ??Fabric topology and traffic flows are highly flexible
  13. 13. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Network and Fabric• Servers typically dual homed to two or moreaccess switches• Redundant connections to the next layer• Distribution and Core can be collapsed intoa single box• L2/L3 boundary typically deployed in theaggregation layer– Spanning tree or advanced L2 technologies(e.g., virtual link aggregation) used to preventloops within the L2 boundary• Services deployed in the L2/L3 boundary ofthe network (load-balancing, firewall, etc.)L2L3CoreAggregationAccessOutside Data Center“cloud”STPSTP
  14. 14. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Network and Fabric• Fibre Channel SAN– Transport and Services are on the same layerin the same devices– Well-defined end device relationships (initiatorsand targets)– Does not tolerate packet drop – requireslossless transport– Only north-south traffic, east-west traffic mostlyirrelevant• Network designs optimized for scale andavailability– High availability of network services providedthrough dual fabric architecture– Edge/Core vs Edge/Core/Edge– Service deploymentClient/ServerRelationships arepre-definedI(c)I(c)T(s)Fabric topology, services, and traffic flows are structuredT2I5I4I3I2I1I0T1T0Switch SwitchSwitchDNS FSPFZoneRSCN DNSFSPFZoneRSCNDNSZoneFSPFRSCN
  15. 15. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Network and Fabric• “Edge-Core” or “Edge-Core-Edge”Topology• Servers connect to the edge switches• Storage devices connect to one or more core switches• HA achieved in two physically separate, but identical,redundant SAN fabric• Very low oversubscription in the fabric (1:1 to 12:1)• FLOGI scaling considerationsFabric ‘A’ Fabric ‘B’HBAFCCoreEdge
  16. 16. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Best Practices for HA• FC Specific– Air gap redundant fabrics– Multipathing software resident on host– Co-location of hosts and storage wherever possible
  17. 17. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Co-Location• What is it?– Ideally, keeping hosts and storage onsame switch– "Zero-hop" topologies• Limits– Scaling– In reality, may not be possible• Physical location can be a limitation• ISLs for distance extension• Keep in mind when you lose a link or aswitch, the other fabric has to be able topick up that slack– Design that into the system
  18. 18. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Best Practices for HA• FC specific - Scale– VE_Ports (ISLs) allowsfor greater scalability– Can still have meshfabric– Can still maintain HA
  19. 19. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Best Practices for HA• HA Elements common toboth FC and Ethernet– Single Spoke (non-HA)
  20. 20. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Best Practices for HA• HA Elements common to bothFC and Ethernet– Redundant connectivity (HA)
  21. 21. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Best Practices for HA• Ethernet-specific (not used for block I/O)– NAS (NFS/CIFS)– Dual attached to the same network segment– Active/Active teaming– Smaller L2 domains
  22. 22. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Best Practices for HA• iSCSI specific (used for block I/O)– Dual Attached to DIFFERENT Networksegments*– No teaming– Avoid routers if possible** Best Practice
  23. 23. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Oh, by the way...Server virtualizationServer virtualization considerations:How do you manage virtual switches?Where is the switching performedVirtual switch, VEB, VEPA / VN_TAGExtending the L2 Domain over L3 constructsNetwork virtualizationOpen vSwitch, VXLAN, etc.Bottom LineIf you have a redundant network, your virtualnetworks will also be redundantServer and network virtualization will probably nothave a big impact on basic HA network design
  24. 24. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Isolation and Redundancy$$LessSharingMoreSharingFailure Tolerance
  25. 25. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Isolation and RedundancyLAN SAN
  26. 26. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.From Ethernet POV• How can you maintain Ethernet best practices of HA . . .– NIC teaming– Multichassis trunkingEthernet FabricFCFC
  27. 27. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.From a Storage POV• . . . while still maintaining FC best practicesof HA?– Isolated fabrics– MultipathingEthernet FabricFCFC
  28. 28. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.High AvailabilityTopologies
  29. 29. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Application Tiers• How would you categorize your applications tiers today?– By application type– By server-to-server and/or server-storage bandwidth• What is the growth you see for application bandwidth?• Would you want different topologies / deployment models based on application type?• What is the effect of server virtualization to the above questions?Separate LAN / SAN SAN A / B w/ConvergedNo SAN A / B
  30. 30. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Topology 1: No Convergence• Same topologies as existingnetworks, but using Ethernetswitches for SANs• Physical and Logical separation ofLAN and SAN traffic• Additional Physical and Logicalseparation of SAN fabricsExample Use Cases:- Outsourced networks- Compliance requirementsHBA/CNAL2L3NIC or CNAFabric ‘A’ Fabric ‘B’FCoEValue SAN can utilize higherperformance, higher density,lower cost Ethernet switchesNative Ethernet LAN Fibre Channel/Fibre Channel over Ethernet SANCoreAggregationAccessCoreEdgeIsolation Convergence
  31. 31. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Topology 2 (Converged at ToR)• Consolidated the LAN Access and the SANEdge by using FCoE• Physical and Logical separation– LAN and SAN traffic at Aggregation Layer– Additional Physical and Logical separation ofSAN fabrics• Higher I/O, HA, fast re-convergence for hostLAN traffic• The Unified Edge supports multiple LAN andSAN topology options– Virtualized Data Center LAN designs– Fibre Channel edge with direct attachedinitiators and targets– Fibre Channel edge-core and edge-core-edgedesignsConvergedFCoE linkDedicatedFCoE linkFCEthernetFabric ‘B’L2L3CNAFabric ‘A’FCFCoEIsolation ConvergenceFC/FCoESwitch
  32. 32. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Trunking and Channeling• Switches operating in N_Port Virtualization mode(End-Host mode for UCS) or FC-SW (Switch Mode forUCS) Mode• F-Port Trunking and Channeling on the links betweenan NPV device and upstream switch (NP port ->F_Port)• F_Port Trunking: Better multiplexing of traffic usingshared links (multiple VSANs on a common link)• F_Port Channeling: Better resiliency between NPVedge and Director Core– No host re-login needed per link failure– No FSPF recalculation due to link failure• Simplifies FC topology (single uplink from NPV deviceto FC directorFabric ‘A’ SupportingVSAN 20 & 40VSAN 20, 40Fabric ‘B’ SupportingVSAN 30 & 50VFVNTFTNPServer ‘1’VSAN 20 & 30Server ‘2’VSAN 40 & 50NPV TORSwitchVLAN 10,50VLAN 10,30Isolation ConvergenceVSAN 30,50VLAN 10,20VLAN 10,40FC/FCoESwitchWith Intel® Xeon® processor
  33. 33. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Trunking/Channeling with UCS• More flexibility in engineering FC traffic vs. 1 VSAN per uplink– Aggregate Uplinks transparent to host Multi-path drivers– Requires EMC Connectrix MDS or N5K to Work (bothfeatures)• Provide isolation to SAN traffic over the same physical link– Help consolidate Infrastructure– vHBAs can be on different VSANs• All VSANs will be trunked on every uplink FC/FCoE port– Selecting a subset of VSANs for individual uplink ports notsupported• Scalability: Max of 32 VSANs per UCS system• VSAN trunking supported in NPV and FC Switch mode FIoperation• VSAN Trunking is not available for direct connect FC/FCoEStorage Port typesvFCsVSAN 100VSAN 300VSAN 200VSAN 400SAN A SAN BWith Intel® Xeon® processor
  34. 34. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Topology 3 (Fabric/Completely Converged)• LAN and SAN traffic share physicalswitches and traffic uses dedicatedlinks between switches• All Access and Aggregationswitches are FCoE FCF switches• Improved HA, load sharing andscale for LAN vs. traditional STPtopologiesVEFabric ‘B’LAN/SANConvergedFCoE linkDedicatedFCoE linkFCEthernetFabric ‘A’Isolation Convergence
  35. 35. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.UCS iSCSI and Appliance Port Redundancy• Host Multi-pathing drivers are used in lieuof link aggregation network technology• MS does not support using s/w iSCSI andport channels for iSCSI failover• Best practice is to use MPIO drivers• Failure semantics look like FC in thisregardUCS B-SeriesUCS FI UCS FIStorageFCoEiSCSINFSCIFSUnified Appliance PortWith Intel® Xeon® processor
  36. 36. © Copyright 2013 EMC Corporation. All rights reserved.Summary• Highly Available network topologiescontinue to be a requirement for today’sdata center environments• Converging all protocols onto a single setof physical links while maintaining isolationcan be managed• Several converged topologies areavailable that allow for various degrees ofisolation
  37. 37. Visit Cisco Booth 401• Twitter: @ciscoDC• Facebook.com/CiscoDC• Video: http://www.youtubecisco.com/datacenter• Cisco blog: http://blogs.cisco.com/datacenter• Slideshare: http://slideshare.com/CiscoDataCenterIn Collaboration with Intel®Intel, the Intel logo, Xeon and Xeon inside are trademarks of Intel Corporation inthe U.S. and other countries.

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