Local Edition
Provisioning and Dial Plan with Cisco
Unified Communications Manager 10.x
Peter DePalma
Collaboration Consul...
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public
Local Edition
Objective and Assumptio...
Local Edition
E.164-based Dial Plan with CUCM 10.x
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public
Local Edition
Dial Plan
Background
Wh...
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public
Local Edition
Dial Plan
+E.164 and Ci...
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public
Local Edition
Globalized Dial Plan
Re...
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public
Local Edition
What is it?
SIP Uniform...
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public
Local Edition
Taking Advantage of URI...
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public
Local Edition
Alpha URI vs. Number
Ho...
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public
Local Edition
SIP URI Routing
The Int...
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public
Local Edition
Inter-Cluster Lookup Se...
© 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public
Local Edition
ILS and Home Cluster Di...
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Local Edition
ILS Networking
Informat...
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Local Edition
ILS
Topologies
ILS Node...
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ILS
Other Consideration...
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Local Edition
Collaboration Meeting R...
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Local Edition18 “Leaf Clusters”
cisco...
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Local Edition
19 “Leaf Clusters”
cisc...
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Local Edition
CUCM, loop prevention v...
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Local Edition
OTLD:acme.comOTLD:cisco...
Local Edition
Provisioning
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Local Edition
User administration has...
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CUCM 10 Dial Plan and P...
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Local Edition
amer.cisco.com
25
CUCM ...
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CUCM 10 Provisioning Fo...
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User’s must be provisio...
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Two Ways to Provision D...
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Wrap Up
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Participate in the “My ...
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Complete Your Online Se...
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Cucm 10 provisioning and dial plan clle-2014
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    KEVIN ROARTY: All right, folks, good afternoon. Welcome back. Hope you guys had a good lunch. My name is Kevin Roarty. I'm a technical marketing engineer with the BU, formerly known as IPC BU. It's a long story. I won't talk about that now. But what we're going to talk about today is Enterprise Dial Plan. And the focus is definitely going to be on Communications Manager. We see VCS in the title here, but it's really what have we done in Communications Manager 9.0 to allow us to better inter-operate with VCS as well as others?



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    So let's talk just about ILS now and not necessarily about URI syncing and what your ILS network can look like. And we have plenty of different options. You're seeing here several different topologies. You've got just the two clusters. You've got four clusters, six, six again-- it makes me do my math here-- eight clusters. And really, what we're showing here is we've got the clusters highlighted with blue. And we're going to call those hub clusters. And this is a term that we will also see in the user interface. And you'll define whether your cluster is a hub or a spoke. So in this case, we've got six clusters. They're all hubs, so they're all meshed together. They have ILS networking in between each one. In this case, we have three hubs and five spokes. And so really, the message here is, it depends upon what your deployment looks like as far as how you want to build your ILS network. Maybe all hubs works just fine. Maybe you start with three hubs. And then you start adding other clusters. And you can do it with just spokes.



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    So let's talk about how to set this up and how this works. And we'll talk about the difference between the spoke and the hub. So like we said, each cluster node is its local URIs. We keep those in the database. And we're going to advertise those to each other cluster. Sorry. We're going to advertise those to our hub, our hub only. We have a Sync Interval that you can define how often you want your cluster to go out and poll the other hubs and say, do you have anything new? I think the default is 10 minutes. You can dial it down all the way to a minute. And again, keep in mind that this is information that is not going to be changing very rapid, in most cases. You're going to set this up. You'll have URIs adds and changes and moves. But for the most part, this data is not terribly dynamic. One other key thing to understand is that-- and I think I mentioned this-- all hubs are meshed together. And so what that leaves you with, the situation is, between one spoke to any other spoke, you have a maximum of three hops, so spoke, hub, hub, spoke. And here is the interval that we talked about. So to keep in mind, you make a change on one cluster, it's a spoke. You're syncing every 10 minutes. To pick that up on any other spoke cluster, you've got a maximum of 30 minutes, I believe, before that's going to show up there.



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  • Cucm 10 provisioning and dial plan clle-2014

    1. 1. Local Edition Provisioning and Dial Plan with Cisco Unified Communications Manager 10.x Peter DePalma Collaboration Consulting Systems Engineer (Mid-South Select Region)
    2. 2. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition Objective and Assumptions • Objective To understand the importance and power of the Inter-cluster Lookup Service (ILS) and its role in URI propagation / Global Dial Plan Replication (GDPR), and Jabber Service Discovery To understand how ILS and multi-cluster synchronization of information is achieved To understand new provisioning methods for users in CUCM and IM/P • Assumption Attendee understands the basics of UCM endpoint addressing (E.164 and URIs) and dial plan management (CSS and PTs), trunks, DNs, patterns, etc. in a multi-cluster environment. Throughout this presentation, we will be referring to end-to-end Enterprise dial plans of customers with some of the following characteristics E.164-based dial plans Larger footprint, many endpoints at many remote locations International locations, and maybe some interest in Tail End Hop Off (TEHO) Multiple CUCM Clusters 2
    3. 3. Local Edition E.164-based Dial Plan with CUCM 10.x
    4. 4. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition Dial Plan Background What is a “Dial Plan” An administratively configured collection of rules instructing call processing elements on how to allow, block, and route calls/sessions between endpoints inside or outside of your network. Dial plan can also handles distribution of patterns for routing, address manipulation, and the presentation of certain address elements to end users Call Routing and Dial Behavior/Habits Dial Plans and their capabilities within Cisco and in the industry are evolving due to things like: Centralization of call control platforms New forms of addressing (Uniform Resource Identifier) Globalization of the Economy Need for universal click-2-dial functionality “I have a 4 digit Dial Plan”… Is there really even such a thing with most customers? If so, is probably referring to situation where routing and dial behavior are identical and require no manipulation or different forms of dial habits (ex. a very small systems residing in a single country or provider’s network). Cisco and Dial Plan Due to the evolution of collaboration, Cisco has likewise evolved it’s dial plan capabilities within it’s collaboration applications and endpoints 4
    5. 5. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition Dial Plan +E.164 and Cisco What is +E.164 An ITU-T recommendation defining a numbering plan for the world-wide PSTN. It’s numeric presentation is normally prefixed with a “+” to indicate the country or origin. +E.164 is very important in centralized systems Most customers use a form of E.164 for numbering and routing today (as opposed to things like store numbers, etc.) Guarantees uniqueness of addressing throughout your entire global system. Uniqueness of addressing is required for a functional globalized routing scheme in a system Brings much needed structure to the variability of pattern length and overlap of patterns between various countries around the globe. +1 (N. America and various islands) +[2-9]XX (rest of globe) Cisco Numeric Dial Plan Possible Recommendation Globalized dial plan approach for our system (system = CUCM clusters) Address the DN with a globalized unique number using +E.164 (unless need the “site code” or “store number” methodology) Can also use something else that is globalized, like 8XXXXXXX using the last 7 digits of the phone number. Have both dial-able in the system: +E.164 for routing and click to dial, 8XXXXXXX for dialing inter-site from key pad Obviously, can still have XXXX intra-site. When digits enter the system, globalize the called and calling number to a global form, such as +E.164 Once globalized, the unique patterns can route through the system without possibility of overlap Upon egress (to PSTN, phone), localize the number. Conform to the egress’ routing and presentation needs Utilize tools such as CSS/PTs, Calling/Called party transformations, and Global Dial Plan Replication with ILS (covered later) See SRND for details 5
    6. 6. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition Globalized Dial Plan Recommendation Example with +E.164 in action 6 Jabber Client DN = +14085551212 Mobile Device +33622334455 France PSTN Jabber Client dials French cell phone 901133622334455 EMEA ClusterN. Amer Cluster San Jose Remote SIP Trunk ILS and GPDR (detail covered later) Paris Remote CUBE Paris User DN = +33166778888 Paris User +33166778888 France TEHO +33XXXXXXXXX GPDR Pattern Entries and +E164s +33166778888 (DN) France GPDR pttn. +33XXXXXXXXX • How might we implement enterprise global dial plan for US dialing to France for On-net calls and TEHO calls while maintaining expected user dialing habits • We will be looking only at one direction for simplicity in this example • On-net call • Off-net call with Tail-End-Hop-Off routing GPDR Table +33166778888  EMEA Cluster +33XXXXXXXXX  EMEA Cluster Translate (TP) called number in order to globalize it to +33166778888 (unless initially dialed, then no need to translate) Calling number already in globalized format in our example  Jabber dials Paris co-worker 901133166778888 OR 86778888 OR +33166778888 (click-2-call) Specific DN match +33166778888 Routes to EMEA Cluster Specific DN or GPDR local match +33166778888 Matching on DN’s partition Transformation pattern localizes calling number on Egress (to phone) and can be applied to the device pool of the phone We convert all International (from France’s perspective) calling numbers to match dialing habit of users for aesthetics and redial +14085551212  0014085551212 translation pattern to globalize called to +33166778888 Calling number already in globalized format in our example  GPDR pattern match +33XXXXXXXXX Routes to EMEA Cluster Local Route Pattern +33XXXXXXXXX to CUBE Localize calling and called number to what French PSTN likes (Transformation Pattern at Egress of SIP Trunk Level) For Example…. Called: +33622334455  0622334455 Calling: +14085551212  0014085551212
    7. 7. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition What is it? SIP Uniform Resource Identifier (Email address best suited?, ex. pete@cisco.com Used for internet video dialing for years and gaining universal popularity for SIP dialing Why? Because its globally routable (DNS-based) and friendly, but E.164 is not going away any time soon Cisco UC 9+ implements blended identity and is simply an alias to the DN Primary URI plus up to 4 more will ring DN URI can be automatically imported from LDAP mail attribute or the msRTCSIP-primaryuseraddress attribute URI can be dialed with or without the Right-Hand-Side (RHS) Call “pete”, then “cisco.com” is automatically added from domain name configured in the Organizational Top Level Domain service parameter I have split DNS (Internal “cisco.local” external “cisco.com”). What is used where? Internal host names for network connectivity, use internal For User-facing things (SIP addressing and dialing), use external Same goes for separating video out into a sub-domain unless necessary (ex. @video.cisco.com) SIP URI Dialing Intro cucmpub.cisco.net
    8. 8. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition Taking Advantage of URI Dialing Extending Your Collaboration to the Rest of the World VCS-E / Expressway Edge VCS-C / Expressway Core Cisco Firewall Traversal for Collaboration Workloads. SIP in this example. Securely extend your entire Collaboration infrastructure’s communications to the rest of the world Enables URI Dialing to and from CUCM registered endpoints that support SIP URI dialing All Telepresence endpoints, Jabber 9.6+, and most all current SIP phone loads support URI dialing Expressway C/E comes free for use with Jabber remote access with all levels of licensing in CUCM 9.x+ Quick and easy installation For calls to and from other domains, Rich Media Session Licenses
    9. 9. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition Alpha URI vs. Number How to Differentiate Between a Number and an Alpha URI 9 Alpha URIs and numbers routed differently Dialed “numbers” can contain: +, 0-9, *, A-D SIP Profile now has “Dial String Interpretation” setting Setting is relevant for calls from endpoints and trunks Before CUCM 9.x, we always treated the LHS of a URI as a number and processed accordingly Default: If LHS consists of characters 0-9, * or + then process as a number. Else, treat as URI This behavior can be bypassed if endpoint uses the “user=phone” tag in request URI forces treatment as numeric URI Recommendation: use un-ambiguous alpha URIs The indirect use of the email address for LDAP imported user URIs usually fits and has become de-facto standard “Always treat all dial strings as URI addresses” effectively disables numeric routing
    10. 10. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition SIP URI Routing The Intra-domain Routing Problem Hierarchical URI suffix design can identify home cluster (by sub- domain) Reachability established through SIP route patterns for host parts Simplifies routing. Example: – sjc.cisco.com  1.1.1.1 – nyc.cisco.com  2.2.2.2 However, requiring a hierarchical URI scheme for users adversely effects usability – Sue is sue@sjc.cisco.com – Frank is frank@nyc.cisco.com What if it is flat – There is NO STANDARD for intra-domain routing pete@fra.cisco.com bob@nyc.cisco.com john@sjc.cisco.com nyc.cisco.com fra.cisco.com ? pete@cisco.com john@cisco.com bob@cisco.com IM and Presence clusters have long solved intra-domain routing (for XMPP) by way of “inter-cluster peering” relationships… IM/P Cluster IM/P Cluster IM/P Cluster
    11. 11. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition Inter-Cluster Lookup Service (ILS) What and Why What is ILS Inter-Cluster Look-up Service (ILS) is a cluster-wide service in UCM that, when configured on and between UCM clusters, synchronizes information throughout the “ILS Network” It came about in 9.x to solve a major routing and lookup limitations in a multi-cluster environment, and has been greatly enhanced in 10.x "Why" Specifics… It was necessary to support URI addressing and Home Cluster Discovery Also to greatly simplify administrative overhead in a multi-cluster environment Ease adoption of powerful dial plan concepts such as TEHO Because without ILS….. URI dialing pretty much wouldn’t work well in a multi-cluster environment (mass configuration, routing loop avoidance, call setup delay) Would need to duplicate patterns on each cluster We would need to manually configure Jabber clients to a specific cluster 11
    12. 12. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition ILS and Home Cluster Discovery Multi-Cluster Jabber Login Jabber needs to know where to login, get its configuration, and register As of 9.6+, the Jabber Client Framework utilizes a SRV record for UDS on domain suffix domain (ex. cisco.com) Jabber should register to a CUCM node in the right cluster for that user, else the initial login will fail and manual configuration is needed This is easy with one cluster However, in a multi-cluster environment, if it points to a specific cluster, and, for “pedepalm@cisco.com”, it is the wrong cluster Clients need a way to redirect the client to the right cluster SOLUTION: – UDS, which needs ILS, plays an important role in cluster/service discovery. Let’s see how this works… IM/P Cluster IM/P Cluster pedepalm@cisco.com maincucm.cisco.com SME or “Main Cluster” _cisco-uds._tcp.cisco.com.SRV 1 1 8443 maincucm.cisco.com IM/P Cluster ILS
    13. 13. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition ILS Networking Information Synching Components of end-to-end URI/E.164 dialing/routing and home cluster discovery The ILS Network Establishment (which is essentially peering relationships) Enable URI and Global Dial Plan Replication (ex. alternate number advertising) Configure User’s Home Cluster (Jabber) Catalog transfers SIP trunk and Route patterns for actual routing. Called “SIP Route String” ILS networking is foundation for exchange of information only. Specifies destination “SIP Route String”, but doesn't specify how to get to destination. Hence, the need for SIP Route patterns and SIP Trunk topology. SIP connectivity is foundation for call routing based on SIP route patterns and tells how to get to the destination ILS networking URI / E.164 / UDS synching pete@cisco.com and +1408555XXXX (via sjc.cisco.com) gerrard@cisco.com and +3355566XXXX (via fra.cisco.com) pete@cisco.comgerrard@cisco.com SIP Trunks SIP Route Pattern to SIP Route String fra.cisco.com SIP Route Pattern to SIP Route String sjc.cisco.com pete@cisco.com +1408555XXXX Home: sjc.cisco.com Via RS: sjc.cisco.com gerrard@cisco.com +3355566XXXX Home: fra.cisco.com Via RS: fra.cisco.com fra.cisco.com +3355566XXXX sjc.cisco.com +1408555XXXX CUBE ILS Route String Logic URI Dial Peers
    14. 14. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition ILS Topologies ILS Node Types (Stand-Alone, Hub, Spoke) UCM Clusters participating in ILS network form a hub & spoke topology Each Cluster is either a hub or spoke Hubs must be fully meshed Largest diameter = 3 hops ILS Topology is mutually exclusive from SIP Routing 14 ILS hub ILS spoke SME Anyone??
    15. 15. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition ILS Other Considerations Not Mentioned for Brevity 15 Can import Global Dial Plan Catalogs The importing ILS Hub cluster becomes a “proxy ILS node” for non-ILS enabled device (ex. VCS) Create CSV, Create Global Dial Plan catalog Associated to SIP route string, import CSV file against catalog Sync Intervals between clusters Call Routing Logic Understand flow of SIP request vs. numeric SIP request When OTLD gets added Understand new dial plan methodologies New Dial Plan mechanisms must be understood Incorporate ILS into it. Use or don’t use default Partitions for ILS learned patterns/URIs Understand how 10.x auto provisioning during LDAP integration (if used) will work with ILS
    16. 16. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition Collaboration Meeting Room (CMR) Choosing a URI Scheme What is CMR (See "Taking Collaboration to Next Level" Session for details) On-premises, it provides users with their own Rendezvous alias and the ability for those users to manage it (layout, PIN, Friendly Room Name) Available on-prem very soon (requires TMS-PE 1.2, TMS 14.4, Conductor XC 2.3) Will make video pervasive throughout your organization Example URI Formats for Rendezvous identification Left Hand Side (LHS) Rendezvous URI Format meetnow.jdoe@cisco.com or maybe jdoe.meetnow@cisco.com Do something like  meetnow.{mail} or maybe meetnow.{username}@cisco.com inside of TMS Right Hand Side (RHS) Rendezvous URI Format jdoe@meetnow.cisco.com Which Format do I choose: depends on It can depend on your topology, number of clusters and their version (ILS capabilities), and VCS registered endpoints and topology Has significant routing implications: LHS URI routing is complex for the application, requires Regex like matching, and only supported on VCS. However, it’s more flexible and arguably nicer for the end user RHS URI routing is easier for the application, but means having to adopt an less user-friendly hierarchical domain structure If we are all about the end-user experience 17 TMS 14.4
    17. 17. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition18 “Leaf Clusters” cisco.com SIP H.323 H.320 “uk-rm200@cisco.com” 3rd Party Video Endpoint “amer-rm55@cisco.com” “uk-rm32@cisco.com” All User’s Rendezvous URIs meetnow.<mail> (ex. meetnow.pete@cisco.com) cisco.com vcs.cisco.com Add SRV records for SIP/H.323 for video.cisco.com “uk-rm200@video.cisco.com” video.cisco.com Collaboration Meeting Room (CMR) Choosing a URI Scheme Cont… First, understand URI routing capabilities VCS uses regular expressions for URI routing, will “search” different destinations (at the expense of call setup delay), and is for simple and small topologies CUCM is all about deterministic routing in complex topologies, can only route URIs by RHS (ex. @meetnow.cisco.com), and does not “search” for more routes after route selection (it requires returned cause codes to re-route) Problematic Scenario for LHS Rendezvous URI Format Everyone / thing must to be intra-domain, or known as @cisco.com for their URI (per CIO). Therefore, no sub-domains! @cisco.com URI addresses destined at VCS, CUCM leaf clusters, and Conductor ?Where do we route @cisco.com throughout this topology? Potential Solution 1. Use Global Dial Plan Catalog Import (ILS Hub only) Import all host URIs for either VCS Host URIs or Conductor Rendezvous URIs using GDP Catalogs for example, lets say VCS and send to route string vcs.cisco.com Now, @cisco.com routing centers in only place (SME). Continue to route @cisco.com from SME to Conductor CUCM not an issue, as ILS provides for full knowledge of all URIs 2. Defy CIO’s request Make unique the RHS of the 3rd party endpoints on VCS Add appropriate SRV records. 3. Convert all 3rd party endpoints to Cisco and register to CUCM (BEST!!) ?
    18. 18. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition 19 “Leaf Clusters” cisco.com Collaboration Meeting Room (CMR) Choosing a URI Scheme Cont… Best Case Scenario No registered VCS endpoints! All Clusters talking ILS Conductor rendezvous calls all via SME (or “main cluster”) …And Route Rendezvous URIs on LHS How will this work (Best Case Scenario) No registered VCS endpoints All CUCM systems will have exact route matches for all user URIs via ILS (so no need to have routes for *.cisco.com) VCS simply has to route two ways To the Internet (*.*) To the Inside (*.cisco.com) towards SME 1. Route *.* from Leaf Clusters to SME 2. Route *.* from SME towards VCS, and out to Internet 3. Route cisco.com from VCS’s towards SME 4. Route the ILS SIP Route Strings of leaf clusters to the leaf clusters 5. Route cisco.com from SME to Conductor for Rendezvous URIs.
    19. 19. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition CUCM, loop prevention via CSS and PTs Via ILS, CUCM has full knowledge of all specific URIs, so no need for SIP route patterns amongst clusters CUCM Trunks have CSS on them Don’t allow the CSS of the CUCM inbound trunk from VCS to to see the SIP route pattern of *.* VCS has various mechanisms: Primary one being a Search Rule mechanism a call coming from specific zone (trunk) is not sent back from where it come unless it’s been modified 1. Joe calls sally@cisco.com via Jabber (who does not exist) 2. CUCM cluster(s) check ILS DB, nothing found, so follows *.* SIP route pattern towards VCS 3. VCS-C checks local zone for sally@cisco.com Nothing found, sends “any alias” to VCS-E 4. VCS-E checks local zone for sally@cisco.com Nothing found, if unmodified, stops routing even though has *.cisco.com route towards CUCM X CUCM and VCS URI Routing and Loop Prevention
    20. 20. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition OTLD:acme.comOTLD:cisco.com +14085551XXX Internet Numeric Inter-Domain Routing Not ENUM, Not IME VCS-C VCS-E Secure FW Traversal +15164442XXX VCS-C VCS-E Secure FW Traversal PatternType,PSTNFailover,Pattern Pattern,0:,+5164442XXX@acme.com GPDR Import to SIP Route String vcs.cisco.com PatternType,PSTNFailover,Pattern Pattern,0:,+4085551XXX@cisco.com GPDR Import to SIP Route String vcs.acme.com _sip._tcp.acme.com_sip._tcp.cisco.com Requirement – Both me and my business partner have firewall traversal. We’d like to dial each other over the internet via E.164 Problem – CUCM does not support ENUM and IME is EOL – CUCM will attach OTLD (ex. “@cisco.com”), then if no match, send call via normal PSTN route plan. – Ex. when dialing +15164442001 from cisco, the request and To: URI should be +15164442001@acme.com Solution – For a given +E.164, when dialed numerically, the appropriate RHS must be inserted into To: and request URI to make sure that B2B connectivity can be established solely based on host piece routing. – Based on GDPR imported patterns. CUCM can now route based off of RHS to numeric remote destinations. *.* *.* call +15164442001, GPDR match, append @acme.com call +14085551212, GPDR match, append @cisco.com *.* *.*
    21. 21. Local Edition Provisioning
    22. 22. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition User administration has been greatly simplified! Makes use of Profiles and Templates User Profile, Service Profile, Device/Line Templates Templates can now be applied at the LDAP integration or at time of user provisioning. Two provisioning mechanisms added IVR-based Self Provisioning (No Administration Required) Quick User/Phone Add CUCM 10 Provisioning Administrative Improvements
    23. 23. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition CUCM 10 Dial Plan and Provisioning Working Example Overview  Get Active Directory and Numbering Plan in order  Globally dialable numbers in appropriate AD field  Filterable object to determine cluster membership  CUCM 9.x+ blended Identity and URI dialing  CUCM 10.x for ILS  full dial plan replication  Home Cluster discovery  CUCM 10.x for provisioning  Auto Create free Jabber IM/P Clients on AD import  Quick Add or BAT to create CSF  IVR for phones  CUCM 9.x+ for Service Discovery  UC Services and Service Profiles Configured  Jabber discovers home cluster  Jabber Logs into home cluster, queries for UC Services  Home cluster provides assigned UC Services and Jabber will logon to each service  Let’s dive into the details… amer.cisco.com +14085551212 85551212 pete@cisco.com UC Services IM and Presence Voice/Video Visual Voicemail WebEx Directory CTI Control AD (&(objectclass=user)(|(co=United States)(co=Mexico))) (&(objectclass=user)(|(co=United Kingdom)(co=France))) Auto-create on AD import emea.cisco.com SME or Central Cluster ILS Exchange User’s URIs User’s E.164s User’s Home Cluster AD Attribute Population telephoneNumber = +14085551212 otherTelephone = 85551212 mail = pete@cisco.com Provide Services and login instructions Service Profile _cisco-uds._tcp.abc.com.SRV 1 1 8443 cucm.abc.com
    24. 24. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition amer.cisco.com 25 CUCM 10 Provisioning Foundation Service Profile Concept The Service Profile created to simplify Jabber registration and configuration A Service Profile is made up of UC Services. Each UC Service represents a Jabber workload: – Voicemail, HTTP connection for Jabber for visual voicemail – Mail Store, IMAP connection for Jabber to Unity Connection for voicemail retrieval – Conferencing, WebEx site information or Jabber to WebEx or CWMS – Directory, TCP connection for Jabber to AD for LDAP Contacts (as opposed to UDS) – IM and Presence, XMPP connection information for Jabber to CUCM IM/P – CTI, TCP connection for Jabber to CTI application server (CUCM phone control) – Video Conferencing Scheduling Portal, HTTP connection from Jabber to TMS in order for user to control on-prem Collaboration Meeting Rooms (CMR) For Redundancy, there can be more than one UC Service for a given Jabber workload (this depends on the workload application) The UC Services are assigned to one or more Service Profiles – Primary, and sometimes Secondary, and Tertiary UC Services are assigned to a Service Profile The Service Profile is assigned to the user by way of – The User’s configuration page – Through a Feature Group Template (FGT) either… directly (via Quick User Add) or indirectly (via LDAP integration) Voicemail MailStore Conferencing Directory IM and Presence CTI Video Conference Scheduling Portal Voicemail MailStore Conferencing Directory IM and Presence CTI Video Conference Scheduling Portal UCServices ServiceProfile AD FeatureGroupTemplate(FGT) FGT Applied at LDAP import
    25. 25. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition CUCM 10 Provisioning Foundation Provisioning Configuration Provisioning Configuration “Deconstructed”: Assign Access Control Groups to the LDAP Integration configuration Can Create and assign directory numbers from LDAP (with mask) or from a pool of numbers. The DNs will not be assigned to a device until the device is provisioned Assigned Feature Group Templates (FGT) to LDAP integration. Within FGT, we… Assigned Home Cluster and enable IM and Presence. Do not assign a single user to multiple clusters User Profiles and Service Profiles User Profile (Universal Device and Line Templates not shown) Turn On Self Provisioning Add Services to the Service Profile
    26. 26. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition User’s must be provisioned on only 1 cluster, so provisioning users at LDAP import needs to grab only users that belong to it. This can be done in the following ways: – Direct integration’s User Search Base at different OU’s. This might require a somewhat geographical OU design, which is unlikely. – Standard LDAP filters. With Standard LDAP Filters, you must have attributes to filter on – LDAP filters can be nested and complex in order to zero in on the specific user LDAP attributes, but your AD must have the necessary user information in order. You can create a DN at import using Feature Group Templates. Phone number population in AD is important – If in full +E.164 from AD, then you just need to accept that as the DN – URI assigned from mail or msRTCSIP-primaryuseraddress AD attribute – Enable Routing (ILS) and globalized addressing. If imported phone number field not populated with full +E.164, might be much harder to create the Enterprise Alternate Number Assign Home Cluster on import – Home cluster required for IM/P server assignment and URI blended Identity creation – Jabber with IM/P up and running, zero touch In 10.x, we have increased the number of LDAP integrations (to single AD Forest) in a cluster to 30 – Might be a trade off of # integrations vs. filter complexity 27 CUCM 10 Provisioning LDAP and Provisioning with Multiple Clusters AD (&(objectclass=user)(|(co=United States)(co=Mexico)))(&(objectclass=user)(|(co=United Kingdom)(co=France))) Attribute Value sAMAccountName jdoe co United States mail jdoe@cisco.com telephoneNumber +14085551212 otherTelephone 85551212 amer.cisco.comemea.cisco.com cn=users, dc=cisco, dc=com Create the following using FGT Directory Number +14085551212 Blended URI jdoe@cisco.com Enterprise E.164 # w / ILS +14085551212 Enterprise Alt. # w/ ILS 85551212 Home Cluster Assigned LDAP Filter LDAP Filter 
    27. 27. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition Two Ways to Provision Device using CUCM 10 Provisioning 1. Self Service Used in conjunction with Auto Registration Phone must be auto registered before provisioned TIP  add a speed dial to the Universal Line Template assigned to auto auto-registered devices Self Service with CUCM IVR Self Service IVR must be created first on Publisher User follows prompts enters Self Service ID Self Service User ID = form of user phone number 2. Quick User/Phone Add Manually add device to local or AD user Can apply User Info, FGT and auto-created DN automatically from LDAP import Provisioning might be limited to LDAP capabilities UCM 10.x now supports 30 LDAP integrations LDAP attributes and filtering extremely important in multi-cluster environment CUCM 10 Provisioning Creating the Device
    28. 28. Local Edition Wrap Up
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    31. 31. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition Continue Your Education • Demos in the Cisco Campus • Walk-in Self-Paced Labs • Table Topics • Meet the Engineer 1:1 meetings 32
    32. 32. © 2014 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved.Presentation_ID Cisco Public Local Edition Register for CiscoLive! – San Francisco 33 CiscoLive! – San Francisco May 18 – 22, 2014 www.ciscolive.com/us
    33. 33. Local Edition

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