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Editor's Notes

  • Given the successful nature of the partnership between InsightExpress and Cisco on past iterations of global technological research, Cisco was interested in conducting a new round of the Connected World Technology study.
    The execution of this research initiative effectively gathered insights and feedback across Gen X, Gen Y and HR white-collar employees in 15 countries:
    US, Canada, Mexico, Brazil, UK, France, Germany, Netherlands, Poland, Russia, India, China, Japan, South Korea, Australia

    Overall, the research was focused on understanding the current workplace
  • In 2012, Cisco looked at data from a survey of 1,800 college students and young professionals aged 18 to 30 (Gen Y) across 18 countries.






    Emerging trends in use of multiple devices, wearables, technology used for recruiting and workplace technology policies lead us to wonder – what more can we find out about Gen Y, how they compare to Gen X, and what companies think of all this?
  • 2014 data shows that Gen Y is still very connected to their technology [this can be two slides if needed, as these are the headline-worthy stats]:

    76% choose a smartphone over TV
    Nearly split on taking sense of smell (58%) over Internet access (42%)
    54% look at their smartphone first before anything else in the morning
    45% would give carrier access to all personal information for a free smartphone with free data
    22% of Gen Y and 17% of Gen X professionals would be most concerned about losing their smartphone during a robbery
    If a brain implant made the World Wide Web instantly accessible, 26% of Gen Y and 21% of Gen X professionals would have the surgery
    48% would sacrifice sex for one month rather than sacrifice their smartphone

    We see these Gen Y values carrying over into the workplace
  • 2014 data shows that Gen Y is still very connected to their technology [this can be two slides if needed, as these are the headline-worthy stats]:

    76% choose a smartphone over TV
    Nearly split on taking sense of smell (58%) over Internet access (42%)
    54% look at their smartphone first before anything else in the morning
    45% would give carrier access to all personal information for a free smartphone with free data
    22% of Gen Y and 17% of Gen X professionals would be most concerned about losing their smartphone during a robbery
    If a brain implant made the World Wide Web instantly accessible, 26% of Gen Y and 21% of Gen X professionals would have the surgery
    48% would sacrifice sex for one month rather than sacrifice their smartphone

    We see these Gen Y values carrying over into the workplace
  • Attachment to personal, especially mobile, technology is carrying into the workplace more and more:

    The majority of Gen X and Gen Y professionals use 2-3 devices per day
    53% of both Gen X and Gen Y workers prefer smartphones to desk phones
    40% of Gen Y and 34% of Gen X workers believe that by 2020 the smartphone will be the most important device
  • The death of the laptop? Has this been a huge exaggeration?
    (Graphic representation of):
    7 in 10 HR professionals think Gen Y employees are able to perform tasks faster if they are allowed to use their mobile devices and apps instead of desktop, laptop or notebook PC’s.
    But, 40% of respondents would still choose a laptop over another device for work
    The smartphone is overwhelmingly the second-rated choice (34% Gen Y; 27% Gen X)
  • Is Gen Y really the virtual, app generation?
    (Graphic representation of):
    63% use a pen and paper to take notes during a meeting vs. 13% using a smartphone
    The largest proportion (39%) of Gen Y professionals who use a technology-driven device to take notes indicate doing so using Microsoft Word, distantly followed by Google Docs (13%). Only 8% use Evernote.
  • What is the reality of application use at work? (compare Gen Y vs. Gen X)
    About half of those surveyed have 20 or more personal applications, while the vast majority (92%) indicate having less than 20 work related apps. Further, nearly 7 in 10 use less than 10 apps (work & personal) regularly each day.

    Key differences come out in the Gen Y to Gen X comparison: the number of Gen X workers with 60-99 apps on their smartphones is more than double the number of Gen Y workers who have downloaded that many apps
  • More than half of professionals (Gen X and Gen Y) consider themselves accessible for work 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, including 3 in 10 who are accessible by both email and phone.
    Roughly two thirds of professionals believe that an organization that has adopted a flexible, mobile and remote work model has a competitive advantage over one that requires employees to be in the office from 9am to 5pm every weekday.
    About half of Gen X and Gen Y professionals feel their organization’s Human Resources department is adjusting to enable a more mobile, flexible work style for its employees, though nearly one third feel it is not doing so quickly enough.
    From an HR perspective, 56% indicate their HR department has already implemented or is planning on implementing a more mobile, flexible work style.
  • Top 5 Ways Technology is Changing the Way You Work:
    Eliminating Boundaries: the influx of smart, mobile devices into the workplace seems to have reset expectations on where and how work should happen
    Supporting stat: 27% of Gen Y workers surveyed would relocate to Mars if their company opened a branch.
    Enabling New Interview Techniques: with workers more willing to explore opportunity wherever it arises – even in a galaxy far, far away – those in charge of hiring feel the same way and want talent wherever it comes from.
    58% of HR workers surveyed would hire a candidate without ever meeting face-to-face and relying solely on video interaction
    Creating the “Supertasker:” access to multiple smart devices (on average, 2-3 per person) has enabled workers to work anytime, anywhere and be available 24/7.
    About half of Gen X and Gen Y professionals believe Supertasking would make an individual more productive. Similarly, HR professionals (62%) predominantly believe Supertaskers increase their organization’s productivity.
    HR professionals feel that Supertaskers increase the expectations of a “high performer” at their organization and as such, most feel Supertaskers are best suited for a job.
    Stretching the Workday: the greater flexibility allowed by technology has also changed the 9-to-5 workday, with many workers and HR professionals moving toward flexible scheduling, remote working capabilities and always-on work communication.
    More than half of professionals consider themselves accessible for work 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, including 3 in 10 who are accessible by both email and phone.
    While salary is the most important factor for most in their decision to accept a position, the flexibility to set their own schedule or the ability to work remotely is most important to roughly 1 in 5 Gen X and Gen Y professionals, as well as one third of HR professionals.
    Making us Dream of What’s Next: in the few years that smartphones went from a bring-your-own-device hot topic to an everyday norm, we are optimistic about the future technology offers for our work lives.
    Roughly 8 in 10 professionals believe middle income workers will have robots that can assist them with various work related activities – although most do not expect such robots to be available by the year 2020.
    Assuming a company invented a brain implant that made the World Wide Web instantly accessible, roughly one quarter would move forward with the operation – Gen Y professionals (26%) slightly more so than Gen X (21%).
  • [graphic representation of: who prefers the traditional workday, and how does technology support that?]
    About 45% of workers want the freedom to work and play from anywhere, at anytime, with no restrictions (vs. 9 –5 workday).
    Most Gen X professionals believe Gen Y employees would prefer a flexible work schedule, though Gen Y professionals are split. 25% of Gen Y workers currently work for an organization that allows flexible working. Roughly one third (34%) enjoy working from home because it saves time on the commute.
    The largest proportion of Gen Y professionals (44%) indicate being more focused and productive when working in the office, while Gen X professionals (38%) cite being equally focused and productive both at home and in the office.
  • Gen X (42%) and Gen Y (44%) professionals, as well as nearly 6 in 10 (58%) HR professionals consider themselves Supertaskers.
    Among Supertaskers, the largest proportion cite Supertasking best on a smartphone (43% Gen Y and 37% Gen X)
    When Supertasking, the majority typically mix work and personal activities, particularly Gen X professionals (70%).
    HR professionals (62%) predominantly believe Supertaskers increase their organization’s productivity. Most feel Supertaskers are best suited for a managerial, an individual contributor or an executive role.
    Additionally, nearly two thirds of HR (62%) believe in the year 2020, Supertasking will be most coveted by their organization.
  • [graphic representation of: what device is needed to supertask? What other technologies might support supertasking for today’s workforce? In the future?]
    43% Gen Y and 37% Gen X supertask best on a smartphone
    In addition to enabling workplace supertasking, we expect technology to continue to make our lives easier:
    When it comes to self-driven cars, the majority do not expect them to be available by the year 2020. About 3 in 10, though, do believe they will be available, allowing for an easier commute and leaving them free to get work done.
    About 75% of professionals believe middle income workers will have robots that can assist them with various work related activities – although most do not expect such robots to be available by the year 2020.
  • Supporting Data Points:
    Today’s workforce is global, mobile and flexible, and businesses are coming around to the value of virtual technologies and flexible work styles.
    The 9-to-5 work day is over; robots may be the next assistants; laptops are no longer the preferred work device; wearables may gain share in the office.
    About one quarter of Gen X and Gen Y professionals would be willing to move to Mars or another planet if their organization was to open a branch.
    Nearly 6 in 10 (58%) HR professionals would be willing to hire a candidate by only interviewing him or her using video conferencing without ever conducting an interview in person.
    Though Gen Y Supertaskers are somewhat evenly divided in how they Supertask work and personal activities, most Gen X Supertaskers (70%) indicate mixing work and personal activities throughout their day when Supertasking.
    Although professionals are divided in their opinions regarding the consequences of Supertasking, Gen Y professionals are slightly more likely to believe that Supertasking makes an individual more productive – mainly led by those in Mexico, China, India and Brazil.
    Most Gen X professionals think Gen Y employees between the ages of 18 and 30 are able to perform tasks faster than them using mobile devices and apps.
    In exchange for a free smartphone with unlimited data service, more than 4 in 10 professionals (Gen X and Gen Y) would allow their carrier/service provider access to all of the data and information stored on the phone.
  • When it comes to the importance of testing the boundaries to find the best talent versus finding someone who fits into their organizations’ culture but with less talent, HR professionals are divided
    In the next few years, most HR professionals believe that even with changes and advances in technology, their organization will still need to relocate employees and new hires, as it continues to require that employees are in the office every weekday – 44% believe flexibility will be required for most workers
    34% HR indicate the greatest challenge in managing Gen Y is their “I want it now” ambition.
    47% of HR professionals feel Gen Y employees are most effective at Supertasking
    By the year 2020, 48% of HR professionals believe managers will have a choice of whether they will need to be in the same office as their direct reports
    38% of HR professionals feel that their organization’s management will expect its employees to be accessible 24 hours a day/7 days a week by the year 2020 but there will be no expectation that they work constantly
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