Emerging Technologies

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Panel on big trends on Cisco’s technology radar.

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  • The Internet of Everything (IoE) will create $14.4 trillion in Value at Stake — the combination of increased revenues and lower costs that will be created or will migrate among companies and industries from 2013 to 2022.The five main factors that fuel IoE Value at Stake are: 1) asset utilization (reduced costs) of $2.5 trillion; 2) employee productivity (greater labor efficiencies) of $2.5 trillion; 3) supply chain and logistics (eliminating waste) of $2.7 trillion; 4) customer experience (addition of more customers) of $3.7 trillion; and 5) innovation (reducing time to market) of $3.0 trillion.Technology trends (including cloud and mobile computing, Big Data, increased processing power, and many others) and business economics (such as Metcalfe’s law) are driving the IoE economy.These technology and business trends are ushering in the age of IoE, creating an unprecedented opportunity to connect the unconnected: people, process, data, and things. Currently, 99 percent of physical objects that may one day be part of the Internet of Everything are still unconnected.To get the most value from IoE, business leaders should begin transforming their organizations based on key learnings from use cases that make up the majority of IoE’s Value at Stake. These use cases include smart grid, smart buildings, connected healthcare and patient monitoring, smart factories, connected private education, connected commercial (ground) vehicles, connected marketing and advertising, and connected gaming and entertainment, among others.Because the stakes are high — over 10 years, companies stand to lose more than a year of profits if they do not embrace IoE — the time to act is now.
  • The Internet of Everything (IoE) will create $14.4 trillion in Value at Stake — the combination of increased revenues and lower costs that will be created or will migrate among companies and industries from 2013 to 2022.The five main factors that fuel IoE Value at Stake are: 1) asset utilization (reduced costs) of $2.5 trillion; 2) employee productivity (greater labor efficiencies) of $2.5 trillion; 3) supply chain and logistics (eliminating waste) of $2.7 trillion; 4) customer experience (addition of more customers) of $3.7 trillion; and 5) innovation (reducing time to market) of $3.0 trillion.Technology trends (including cloud and mobile computing, Big Data, increased processing power, and many others) and business economics (such as Metcalfe’s law) are driving the IoE economy.These technology and business trends are ushering in the age of IoE, creating an unprecedented opportunity to connect the unconnected: people, process, data, and things. Currently, 99 percent of physical objects that may one day be part of the Internet of Everything are still unconnected.To get the most value from IoE, business leaders should begin transforming their organizations based on key learnings from use cases that make up the majority of IoE’s Value at Stake. These use cases include smart grid, smart buildings, connected healthcare and patient monitoring, smart factories, connected private education, connected commercial (ground) vehicles, connected marketing and advertising, and connected gaming and entertainment, among others.Because the stakes are high — over 10 years, companies stand to lose more than a year of profits if they do not embrace IoE — the time to act is now.
  • TOP MESSAGESSmart Grid is part of a larger energy network platform that includes Industrial, Prosumers, Utility Operations, and Smart Energy MarketsEnergy Network Platform will provide observability essential to efficient utilization of energy resources and optimization of power delivery chain operations – enable platform for energy innovation at every levelUsing the energy network as the platform, the entire energy ecosystem can be made smarter, faster, more agile, resilient and most importantly, more secure – from generation to consumptionDETALSHow the world creates, distributes and consumes energy is one of the defining issues facing our planet today.Traditional approaches of increasing capacity will no longer suffice.We need a secure, and scalable end-to-end communication infrastructure that can provide real-time information on the performance and health of the grid to grid operators, while at the same time enabling consumers to not just participate, but actually collaborate with utilities in energy efficiency and energy management programs. Leveraging the network as the platform for energy management will enable utility companies optimize power supply and demand, improve the Grid security and reliability, more efficiently integrate renewable energy resources on to the grid, and reduce operational costs.
  • If we take a closer look at the software, network-wide analytics and policy are needed so that the data in motion intelligence is properly handled once extracted from the network infrastructure. Real time and historical analytics are applied and then orchestrated to policy engines which provides enforcement at the user or domain level. Lastly in this model, specific instruction can be programmed back down to the network, application, or device for an optimal user experience.As a result, service providers can improve monetization and differentiation through seizing new market opportunities that include Indoor Location Services, Premium Video Services, Mobile Advertising, and Sponsored Data.Service Providers can also better optimize across existing access, core, and cloud resources for better network scale, resource utilization, and a superior experience.
  • The Internet of Everything (IoE) will create $14.4 trillion in Value at Stake — the combination of increased revenues and lower costs that will be created or will migrate among companies and industries from 2013 to 2022.The five main factors that fuel IoE Value at Stake are: 1) asset utilization (reduced costs) of $2.5 trillion; 2) employee productivity (greater labor efficiencies) of $2.5 trillion; 3) supply chain and logistics (eliminating waste) of $2.7 trillion; 4) customer experience (addition of more customers) of $3.7 trillion; and 5) innovation (reducing time to market) of $3.0 trillion.Technology trends (including cloud and mobile computing, Big Data, increased processing power, and many others) and business economics (such as Metcalfe’s law) are driving the IoE economy.These technology and business trends are ushering in the age of IoE, creating an unprecedented opportunity to connect the unconnected: people, process, data, and things. Currently, 99 percent of physical objects that may one day be part of the Internet of Everything are still unconnected.To get the most value from IoE, business leaders should begin transforming their organizations based on key learnings from use cases that make up the majority of IoE’s Value at Stake. These use cases include smart grid, smart buildings, connected healthcare and patient monitoring, smart factories, connected private education, connected commercial (ground) vehicles, connected marketing and advertising, and connected gaming and entertainment, among others.Because the stakes are high — over 10 years, companies stand to lose more than a year of profits if they do not embrace IoE — the time to act is now.
  • The Internet of Everything (IoE) will create $14.4 trillion in Value at Stake — the combination of increased revenues and lower costs that will be created or will migrate among companies and industries from 2013 to 2022.The five main factors that fuel IoE Value at Stake are: 1) asset utilization (reduced costs) of $2.5 trillion; 2) employee productivity (greater labor efficiencies) of $2.5 trillion; 3) supply chain and logistics (eliminating waste) of $2.7 trillion; 4) customer experience (addition of more customers) of $3.7 trillion; and 5) innovation (reducing time to market) of $3.0 trillion.Technology trends (including cloud and mobile computing, Big Data, increased processing power, and many others) and business economics (such as Metcalfe’s law) are driving the IoE economy.These technology and business trends are ushering in the age of IoE, creating an unprecedented opportunity to connect the unconnected: people, process, data, and things. Currently, 99 percent of physical objects that may one day be part of the Internet of Everything are still unconnected.To get the most value from IoE, business leaders should begin transforming their organizations based on key learnings from use cases that make up the majority of IoE’s Value at Stake. These use cases include smart grid, smart buildings, connected healthcare and patient monitoring, smart factories, connected private education, connected commercial (ground) vehicles, connected marketing and advertising, and connected gaming and entertainment, among others.Because the stakes are high — over 10 years, companies stand to lose more than a year of profits if they do not embrace IoE — the time to act is now.
  • The Internet of Everything (IoE) will create $14.4 trillion in Value at Stake — the combination of increased revenues and lower costs that will be created or will migrate among companies and industries from 2013 to 2022.The five main factors that fuel IoE Value at Stake are: 1) asset utilization (reduced costs) of $2.5 trillion; 2) employee productivity (greater labor efficiencies) of $2.5 trillion; 3) supply chain and logistics (eliminating waste) of $2.7 trillion; 4) customer experience (addition of more customers) of $3.7 trillion; and 5) innovation (reducing time to market) of $3.0 trillion.Technology trends (including cloud and mobile computing, Big Data, increased processing power, and many others) and business economics (such as Metcalfe’s law) are driving the IoE economy.These technology and business trends are ushering in the age of IoE, creating an unprecedented opportunity to connect the unconnected: people, process, data, and things. Currently, 99 percent of physical objects that may one day be part of the Internet of Everything are still unconnected.To get the most value from IoE, business leaders should begin transforming their organizations based on key learnings from use cases that make up the majority of IoE’s Value at Stake. These use cases include smart grid, smart buildings, connected healthcare and patient monitoring, smart factories, connected private education, connected commercial (ground) vehicles, connected marketing and advertising, and connected gaming and entertainment, among others.Because the stakes are high — over 10 years, companies stand to lose more than a year of profits if they do not embrace IoE — the time to act is now.
  • The Internet of Everything (IoE) will create $14.4 trillion in Value at Stake — the combination of increased revenues and lower costs that will be created or will migrate among companies and industries from 2013 to 2022.The five main factors that fuel IoE Value at Stake are: 1) asset utilization (reduced costs) of $2.5 trillion; 2) employee productivity (greater labor efficiencies) of $2.5 trillion; 3) supply chain and logistics (eliminating waste) of $2.7 trillion; 4) customer experience (addition of more customers) of $3.7 trillion; and 5) innovation (reducing time to market) of $3.0 trillion.Technology trends (including cloud and mobile computing, Big Data, increased processing power, and many others) and business economics (such as Metcalfe’s law) are driving the IoE economy.These technology and business trends are ushering in the age of IoE, creating an unprecedented opportunity to connect the unconnected: people, process, data, and things. Currently, 99 percent of physical objects that may one day be part of the Internet of Everything are still unconnected.To get the most value from IoE, business leaders should begin transforming their organizations based on key learnings from use cases that make up the majority of IoE’s Value at Stake. These use cases include smart grid, smart buildings, connected healthcare and patient monitoring, smart factories, connected private education, connected commercial (ground) vehicles, connected marketing and advertising, and connected gaming and entertainment, among others.Because the stakes are high — over 10 years, companies stand to lose more than a year of profits if they do not embrace IoE — the time to act is now.
  • The Internet of Everything (IoE) will create $14.4 trillion in Value at Stake — the combination of increased revenues and lower costs that will be created or will migrate among companies and industries from 2013 to 2022.The five main factors that fuel IoE Value at Stake are: 1) asset utilization (reduced costs) of $2.5 trillion; 2) employee productivity (greater labor efficiencies) of $2.5 trillion; 3) supply chain and logistics (eliminating waste) of $2.7 trillion; 4) customer experience (addition of more customers) of $3.7 trillion; and 5) innovation (reducing time to market) of $3.0 trillion.Technology trends (including cloud and mobile computing, Big Data, increased processing power, and many others) and business economics (such as Metcalfe’s law) are driving the IoE economy.These technology and business trends are ushering in the age of IoE, creating an unprecedented opportunity to connect the unconnected: people, process, data, and things. Currently, 99 percent of physical objects that may one day be part of the Internet of Everything are still unconnected.To get the most value from IoE, business leaders should begin transforming their organizations based on key learnings from use cases that make up the majority of IoE’s Value at Stake. These use cases include smart grid, smart buildings, connected healthcare and patient monitoring, smart factories, connected private education, connected commercial (ground) vehicles, connected marketing and advertising, and connected gaming and entertainment, among others.Because the stakes are high — over 10 years, companies stand to lose more than a year of profits if they do not embrace IoE — the time to act is now.
  • Emerging Technologies

    1. 1. Stephan MonterdeSenior Manger, Corporate Development Technology© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 1
    2. 2. • Kip Compton, CTO, Video and Collaboration Group High Efficiency Video Codec and 4K Video• Dr. Ananth Sankar, Distinguished Engineer, Collaboration Technology Grou Real Time Conversational Speech Recognition and Speech Translation• Dr. Guido Jouret, VP and GM, Video and Collaboration Group and CTO, Emerging Technologies Group Big Data, Video Analytics, and Internet of Everything (the Platform)• Dave Ward, VP of Engineering, CTO and Chief Architect SDN; Silicon Photonics© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 2
    3. 3. © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 3
    4. 4. Kip ComptonCTO, Video and Collaboration Group© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 4
    5. 5. Dr. Ananth SankarMarch 13, 2013Distinguished Engineer, Collaboration and Technology Group© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 5
    6. 6. When will this product 下個月底。 ship? [At the end of next month.] [這個產品什麼時候出貨?] Speech Recognition Voice  Text Machine Translation Text  Text Speech Synthesis Text  Voice© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 6
    7. 7. Dr. Guido JouretVP and GM, Video and Collaboration Group & CTO Emerging Technologies© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 7
    8. 8. Visible to IT: 8% of people entering the store buy something* Invisible: 92%© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 8 *Source: Luxottica
    9. 9. Smart Energy Markets Power Grid generation to consumption Utility Industrial Operations Energy Consumer© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 9
    10. 10. Dave WardVP of Engineering, CTO and Chief Architect© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 10
    11. 11. Open, Programmable Framework Unlocks Value POLICY Orchestration ANALYTICS Software Monetization Optimization Indoor Location Access Premium Video Transport Sponsored Data Cloud© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 11
    12. 12. Network Evolution • Industry Trends and Implications Applications Virtualization SDN Platforms Datacent APIS ers APIs Network OS Intelligent Orchestration Openstack HYPERVISOR X86 Network Management APIS OpenFlow abstraction Physical and Virtual AUTOMATION The Network is a catalyst in driving “Intelligence up the stack” and simplification in architecture Source: Cisco Internet Business Solutions Group, 2013© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 12
    13. 13. Cisco is Building Next Generation Internet Fabric Applications and Frameworks Consistent System Applications Customer Use Cases: Operational CISCO UNIFIED PLATFORM • Network “Weather” Experience report Mask Infrastructure Orchestration Management • Virtualized Service Service Network Complexity Functions Functions Functions Creation • Premium Video Open Elementary Infrastructure Functions everywhere Accessible (Device Access, Data Store, Security,…) Programmable • Distributed PoP Cloud APIs and Agents • 1 800 DATA Physical and Virtual Infrastructure Source: Cisco Internet Business Solutions Group, 2013© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 13
    14. 14. SiPhotonics is the only disruptive technology that can address these longer term technical and commercial requirements.  Provides size, cost, power reductions  Intersection of silicon and optical ecosystems – leverage industry investment in silicon productization.  Compatible with Cisco ASIC leadership strategy Source: Cisco Internet Business Solutions Group, 2013© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 14
    15. 15. Source: Cisco Internet Business Solutions Group, 2013© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 15
    16. 16. It’s new, it’s needed, and it is changing things… Optical supply Silicon supply MSDC, Enterpris OEMs base ecosystem base ecosystem e, SP customers • Unprepared for • Moving fast into • Cisco moved • Driving cost and technology technology first on vertical Commoditizat’n transition • Strong leverage integration • Forced into • Unprepared for with internal • Merchant vs. supporting 3rd vertical core internal party optics integration competency • Focus on • Looking for transition • New adjacent differentiation strong partners • Competing with market now requires to align with customers • Accelerating both optics and their roadmap adoption ASIC leadership • Strong reputation of Source: Cisco Internet Business Solutions Group, 2013 supply chain© 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 16
    17. 17. © 2010 Cisco and/or its affiliates. All rights reserved. Cisco Confidential 17

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