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CIRCO Creating Business Through Circular Design

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This presentation highlights the relationship between the new opportunities coming from Circular Design principles and how that translates into innovative Circular Business models.

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CIRCO Creating Business Through Circular Design

  1. 1. © Daniel Disselkoen
  2. 2. © Steven Cholewiak CIRCULAR DESIGN Extend product value propositions well beyond the newness horizon.
  3. 3. DESIGN STRATEGIES INSPIRED BY NATURE Many similarities, different approach and focus
  4. 4. DESIGN STRATEGIES INSPIRED BY NATURE Many similarities, different approach and focus
  5. 5. DESIGN STRATEGIES INSPIRED BY NATURE Many similarities, different approach and focus
  6. 6. © Amy Johansson CIRCULAR ECONOMY The need of changing the current linear ‘take-make-waste’ economical model
  7. 7. LIMITS OF A LINAIR ECONOMY Value destruction TAKE
  8. 8. LIMITS OF A LINAIR ECONOMY Value destruction TAKE MAKE
  9. 9. LIMITS OF A LINAIR ECONOMY Value destruction TAKE MAKE WASTE
  10. 10. LIMITS OF A LINAIR ECONOMY Value preservation TAKE MAKE WASTE
  11. 11. LIMITS OF A LINAIR ECONOMY Decreasing lifespan of consumer products
  12. 12. CIRCULAR ECONOMY Circular Economy System Diagram
  13. 13. CIRCULAR TOASTER Design out Waste project
  14. 14. © The Agency of Design 1. THE OPTIMIST Designed to last for generations
  15. 15. © The Agency of Design 1. THE OPTIMIST Unique day of birth of every toaster
  16. 16. © The Agency of Design 1. THE OPTIMIST Aluminium cast with 100% recycled content
  17. 17. © The Agency of Design 1. THE OPTIMIST Durable design and easy to repair
  18. 18. © The Agency of Design 2. THE PRAGMATIST Creating ongoing flow of components
  19. 19. © The Agency of Design 2. THE PRAGMATIST Modular design with individual toasting slots
  20. 20. © The Agency of Design 2. THE PRAGMATIST Refurbishing product and easy to disassemble
  21. 21. © The Agency of Design 2. THE PRAGMATIST Each slot has 9 lives showed on the bottom
  22. 22. © The Agency of Design 3. THE REALIST Closed loop solution for cheapest market
  23. 23. © The Agency of Design 3. THE REALIST Non destructive separation of the materials
  24. 24. © Pelican House CIRCULAR HEADPHONES Start-up challenges the world of electronics
  25. 25. © Pelican House CIRCULAR HEADPHONES Accessibility to high end headphones
  26. 26. © Pelican House CIRCULAR HEADPHONES Non destructive separation of the materials
  27. 27. © Ultimaker VALUE ADDED REPAIR 3D printing opportunities for a circular economy
  28. 28. © Marcel den Hollander HEDGE SCISSORS Broken handle?
  29. 29. © Marcel den Hollander HEDGE SCISSORS Print a new and ergonomic one!
  30. 30. © Marcel den Hollander DINNERWARE SET Broken handle?
  31. 31. DINNERWARE SET Don’t discard, but repair and revamp the whole set! © Marcel den Hollander
  32. 32. © Marcel den Hollander FOOTBALL SHOES Worn out studs?
  33. 33. FOOTBALL SHOES Print a new set for wet-, dry or artificial grass! © Marcel den Hollander
  34. 34. © Marcel den Hollander PAN LID Broken grip?
  35. 35. © Marcel den Hollander PAN LID Print a new one with integrated spoon holder!
  36. 36. © Marcel den Hollander BICYCLE Bracket corroded?
  37. 37. BICYCLE Print a stainless replacement including a holder for your taillight! © Marcel den Hollander
  38. 38. BUSINESS MODEL Because it all starts with business! © Daniel Disselkoen
  39. 39. BUSINESS MODEL ARCHTEYPES focus on selling products or service Sell more, sell faster 1. Classic long-life model 2. Hybrid model 3. Gap-exploiter model 4. Access model 5. Performance model Product Service
  40. 40. © Miele 1. CLASSIC LONG-LIFE Primary revenue stream from sales of high- grade products with a long useful life.
  41. 41. © Philips 2. HYBRID Combination of a durable product and short-lived consumables.
  42. 42. © marktplaats 3. GAP-EXPLOITER Exploits ‘lifetime value gaps’ or leftover value in product systems (reuse).
  43. 43. © Repair cafe Castricum 3. GAP-EXPLOITER Exploits ‘lifetime value gaps’ or leftover value in product systems (repair).
  44. 44. © Upstyle Industries 3. GAP-EXPLOITER Exploits ‘lifetime value gaps’ or leftover value in product systems (remanufacture).
  45. 45. © Car2Go 4. ACCESS Provides product access rather than ownership.
  46. 46. © Philips 5. PERFORMANCE Delivers product performance rather than the product itself.
  47. 47. © Todd McLellan PRODUCT What is the focus of the design?
  48. 48. BUSINESS MODEL ARCHTEYPES built to last or to change Last Change 1. Product Attachment & Trust 2. Product Durability 3. Standardization & Compatibility 4. Ease of maintenance & Repair 5. Upgradability & Adaptability 6. Dis- & Reassembly
  49. 49. © Patek Philippe 1. ATTACHMENT AND TRUST Creating products that will be loved, liked or trusted longer.
  50. 50. © Miele 2. DURABILITY Optimum product reliability to match both economic and emotional lifespan
  51. 51. © Vitsœ 3. STANDARDIZATION & COMPATIBILITY Creating products with parts or interfaces that fit other products as well.
  52. 52. © ifixit 4. EASE OF MAINTENANCE & REPAIR Enabling products to be maintained in tip-top condition.
  53. 53. © Project Ara 5. UPGRADABILITY & ADAPTABILITY Allowing for future expansion and modification.
  54. 54. © Volkswagen Golf 6. DIS- AND REASSEMBLY Ensuring products and parts can be separated and reassembled easily.
  55. 55. © Todd McLellan 1. PRODUCT Start with something that can be taken apart and cycle through different loops
  56. 56. © G Cid 2. SERVICE Include the different usage life stages and related touchpoints of the product
  57. 57. 3. BUSINESS MODEL Describe the cost and revenue structure of the product and services (e.g. touchpoints) © Daniel Disselkoen
  58. 58. © Chantal Bekker CIRCULAR HOCKEY STICK Hockey sticks are used for a short period and junior players outgrow it or prefer new appearance.
  59. 59. © Chantal Bekker CIRCULAR SPEAKERS People bring speakers to camps at music festivals and are left behind, resulting in tones of E-waste.
  60. 60. © Chantal Bekker CIRCULAR TOOTHPASTE Toothpaste tubes are discarded with leftovers and are difficult to recycle due to multi-layered plastics.
  61. 61. LIMITS OF A LINAIR ECONOMY Decreasing stocks of non-renewable resources
  62. 62. LIMITS OF A LINAIR ECONOMY The limitations of continuous growth
  63. 63. LIMITS OF A LINAIR ECONOMY The limitations of continuous growth Continuous growth results if Physical limits are very far off, or Physical limits are themselves growing exponentially
  64. 64. LIMITS OF A LINAIR ECONOMY The limitations of continuous growth Sigmoid growth results if Signals from physical limits to growing economy are instant, accurate and responded to immediately, or The population or economy limits itself without needing signals from external limits
  65. 65. LIMITS OF A LINAIR ECONOMY The limitations of continuous growth Overshoot and oscillation results if Signals or responses are delayed, and Limits are unerodible or are able to recover quickly from erosion
  66. 66. LIMITS OF A LINAIR ECONOMY The limitations of continuous growth Overshoot and collapse results if Signals or responses are delayed, and Limits are erodible (irreversible degraded when exceeded)
  67. 67. The Circular Economy in the Asia Pacific Region www.circularecconomyasia.org

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