END-OF-SEMESTERFIELDWORK SHARINGDarlene Marquez-Caramanzana WD280Cindy Cruz WD 281
Fieldwork Placement
 Empowers women througheducation work, part ofwhich is production ofmodules for women. Produces modules onWomen’s Orient...
CWR Programs and ServicesEducation and TrainingResearch and Data BankAdvocacy and PublicationIn the service of Grassroots ...
CWR Activities2nd Semester 2012-2013
Participation in CWR ActivitiesObjective: To participate in Other CWR activitiesand reflect on the contributions and proce...
Move to Mob:One Billion Rising – Tomas Morato
ULAT LILA
Saving Tubbataha
DZUP – LITNUM Women
International Women’s Day
Voters Education / VAWCOrientation Sessions
Photo CreditsCenter for Women’s ResourcesAWE CWR
WD 280 – FIP I Work PlanDarlene Marquez-Caramanzana PART I: Objectives of the Field InstructionProgram with CWR PART II:...
WD 281 – FIP II Work PlanCindy Cruz PART I: Objectives of the Field InstructionProgram with CWR and Output PART II: Stat...
Principal Objectives To develop critical analyses of thesituation of women and men To implement interventions; and To d...
Specific Objectives1. To write a Review of Related Literature onLiteracy and Numeracy Training as aMethod of Empowering Gr...
Specific Objectives3. To conduct a Literacy and Numeracytraining program (LITNUM) for urban poorwomen, formerly teenage mo...
Deliverables Review of Related Literature on Literacyand Numeracy Training as a Method ofEmpowering Grassroots Women Eva...
Total Number of Hours renderedas of March 17, 2013314 hours
Status of Activities with the CWR:What Has Been Achieved So Far?Activity Participation Move to Mob / OneBillion Rising U...
LITERACY AND NUMERACYAS A TOOL FOR THEEMPOWERMENT OF WOMENReview of Related LiteratureLiteracy and Numeracy Training Progr...
Evolution in Conceptions of Literacy Literacy as a static / an absolute state,made up of autonomous skills Literacy as a...
Development of Literacy Literacy – pre-packaged as perceived bythe planner Literacy – reading, speaking and writing –are...
Whole Language Philosophy Emotionally-safe environment that encouragescreative risk-taking Mistakes viewed as an importa...
Literacy and Numeracy as a Toolfor Empowerment of WomenWhen a LITNUM program is guided by themore progressive definitions ...
Literacy and Numeracy as a Toolfor Empowerment of Women The conduct of the class is an exercise of andtraining for social...
LITNUM Women in my Class
LITNUM Class Grassroots women from urban poorcommunities Former teenage mothers, with school-ageto teenage children Org...
Emergent Literacy Needs - DialoguesLITERACYEDUCATIONHelping their childrenwith homeworkTheir own continuingeducationEMPLOY...
Strategies for a Whole Language /Feminist ClassroomDecisions informed by my background inEducation AND Women and Developme...
Strategies for a Whole Language /Feminist Classroom Learners are part of the decision-makingprocess. As the teacher, I p...
Feedback Marami akong natututunan, kahit natigilang aking pag-aaral. Natutulungan ko ang mga anak ko sahomework nila. Gu...
Feedback Ang feeling namin ay close kami sa inyo,dahil nakakaupo at nakakatawa tayo ngganitong nakapalibot lang sa mesa h...
Challenges Attendance of class members Walang pamasahe Masama pakiramdam / masakit ang ulo Attendance of those who wan...
LITNUM Program Deliverables Evaluate LITNUM Modules 1, 2 and 3 Conduct a LITNUM Training Program witha group of women fr...
LITNUM Class vis-a-vis LITNUM Module The expected level of the class does notqualify as an exact match for LITNUMModule 3...
LITNUM Modules: Initial ReviewThe manuals were very impressive for thefollowing reasons: The CWR used community knowledge...
Initial RecommendationsTechnical, procedural and logistic(content is superb) Learners’ textbook / workbook / collectionof...
Initial Recommendations Future LITNUM Manuals: documentationof decision-making process and rationales diversity of group...
Working with the CWR The principles and ethics of their serviceto grassroots women are deeplyembedded in their conduct of...
Working with the CWR I enjoyed the full benefits of working with ahierarchical organization with a flatorganization’s beh...
References Barton, David and Mary Hamilton. Local Literacies: Reading andWriting in One Community. London: Routledge, 199...
References Knowles, Malcolm; Holton, Edward III; and Richard Swanson. TheAdult Learner: The Definitive Classic in Adult E...
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End of-Semester Fieldwork Sharing Darlene Caramanzana and Cindy Cruz-Cabrera March 2013 Presentation

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Cindy Cruz-Cabrera and Darlene Caramanzana worked with the Center of Women's Resources, a non-profit organization that conducts research and training for women, particularly grassroots women, as their fieldwork at the Department of Women and Development Studies at the University of the Philippines College of Social Work and Community Development. This presentation covered the second half of their fieldwork for the second semester AY2012-2013 - including their findings for the research on violence against women for Darlene,and the literacy and numeracy program for grassroots women for Cindy.

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End of-Semester Fieldwork Sharing Darlene Caramanzana and Cindy Cruz-Cabrera March 2013 Presentation

  1. 1. END-OF-SEMESTERFIELDWORK SHARINGDarlene Marquez-Caramanzana WD280Cindy Cruz WD 281
  2. 2. Fieldwork Placement
  3. 3.  Empowers women througheducation work, part ofwhich is production ofmodules for women. Produces modules onWomen’s Orientation. Helps in the consolidationof data and experiences ofwomen in the context of anintensifying repression.Summary Recap: CWR
  4. 4. CWR Programs and ServicesEducation and TrainingResearch and Data BankAdvocacy and PublicationIn the service of Grassroots Women
  5. 5. CWR Activities2nd Semester 2012-2013
  6. 6. Participation in CWR ActivitiesObjective: To participate in Other CWR activitiesand reflect on the contributions and processes ofa women’s non-government institution inadvocacy and movement building such as:1. CWR Anniversary Celebration2. VAW Campaign3. Move to Mob/One Billion Rising – February 14,20134. Ulat Lila (Fact Sheet) – January – February 20135. International Women’s Day6. Voters’ Education – January to February7. Orientation on CWR/Education sessions/Meetings
  7. 7. Move to Mob:One Billion Rising – Tomas Morato
  8. 8. ULAT LILA
  9. 9. Saving Tubbataha
  10. 10. DZUP – LITNUM Women
  11. 11. International Women’s Day
  12. 12. Voters Education / VAWCOrientation Sessions
  13. 13. Photo CreditsCenter for Women’s ResourcesAWE CWR
  14. 14. WD 280 – FIP I Work PlanDarlene Marquez-Caramanzana PART I: Objectives of the Field InstructionProgram with CWR PART II: Participation in CWR Activities PART III: Other Output PART IV: Status of Objectives, Activities andDeliverables
  15. 15. WD 281 – FIP II Work PlanCindy Cruz PART I: Objectives of the Field InstructionProgram with CWR and Output PART II: Status of Activities with the CWR PART III: Review of Related Literature onLiteracy and Numeracy as Tools ofEmpowerment for Women PART IV: Insights PART V: Initial Recommendations
  16. 16. Principal Objectives To develop critical analyses of thesituation of women and men To implement interventions; and To develop specialized skills inorganizational and programmanagement and other aspects ofdevelopment work
  17. 17. Specific Objectives1. To write a Review of Related Literature onLiteracy and Numeracy Training as aMethod of Empowering Grassroots Women2. To evaluate CWR’s existing Literacy andNumeracy or LITNUM modules –achievement of objectives and revisions onexercises and activities Materials: Assessing existing LITNUM modules Experience: Conducting separate FGDs withformer LITNUM participants and LITNUMparateachers
  18. 18. Specific Objectives3. To conduct a Literacy and Numeracytraining program (LITNUM) for urban poorwomen, formerly teenage mothers (Module3)4. To create a draft of a continuation module(Module 4)5. To make recommendations for the futureconduct of the program and thedevelopment of current and future trainingmodules (Modules 5 and 6)
  19. 19. Deliverables Review of Related Literature on Literacyand Numeracy Training as a Method ofEmpowering Grassroots Women Evaluation Paper on LITNUM Modules 1,2and 3 Draft of LITNUM Module 4 Recommendations for Future Training andModule Development Reflections
  20. 20. Total Number of Hours renderedas of March 17, 2013314 hours
  21. 21. Status of Activities with the CWR:What Has Been Achieved So Far?Activity Participation Move to Mob / OneBillion Rising ULAT LILA Forum On Tubbataha Voters Education – FI Journal) February 14 TomasMorato Campaign Fact Sheet on MigrantWomen Workers Emcee Attended anddocumented (photos) Attended Sampler andOrientation Writing reflections
  22. 22. LITERACY AND NUMERACYAS A TOOL FOR THEEMPOWERMENT OF WOMENReview of Related LiteratureLiteracy and Numeracy Training ProgramLITNUM Manuals
  23. 23. Evolution in Conceptions of Literacy Literacy as a static / an absolute state,made up of autonomous skills Literacy as a process Literacy as socially located Local literacies / multiple literacies What kind of literacy? What is functional? Literacy plans and programs: top-down vs.bottom up A literacy program as being borne ofrelevance, timing, demand
  24. 24. Development of Literacy Literacy – pre-packaged as perceived bythe planner Literacy – reading, speaking and writing –are interconnected parts of a learningprocess and of social transformation. Literacy as freedom Literacy as a continuum Critical literacy / participatory approach toliteracy education
  25. 25. Whole Language Philosophy Emotionally-safe environment that encouragescreative risk-taking Mistakes viewed as an important part oflearning Credit given for “logical mistakes” along withthe distinction between the mistake and thecorrect answer Teacher as a facilitator of a transactionalclassroom - “We learn from each other.” Value given to interests and expertises of thelearner as contexts for relevance andspringboards for motivation in learning. Teach to render yourself dispensable
  26. 26. Literacy and Numeracy as a Toolfor Empowerment of WomenWhen a LITNUM program is guided by themore progressive definitions of literacy andconducted within the framework of the wholelanguage philosophy, it becomes a tool forempowerment of women because: Women’s subjectivities, contexts andparticular situations are valued in the conductand creation of the program. The program is fully participatory, withconceptions of classroom power redefinedand classroom power redistributed.
  27. 27. Literacy and Numeracy as a Toolfor Empowerment of Women The conduct of the class is an exercise of andtraining for social justice in the questioningpower dynamics during discussions of texts,stories, news, and real-life situations. Each woman feels the direct benefits andimpacts as a learner because her felt needsare understood, acted upon and met. They gain control over everyday tasks andstruggles, as well as anticipate control overfuture tasks and options. They begin to view happiness and fulfilment asan entitlement.
  28. 28. LITNUM Women in my Class
  29. 29. LITNUM Class Grassroots women from urban poorcommunities Former teenage mothers, with school-ageto teenage children Organized – Gabriela / SAMAKANA Interests: reading, writing, spelling inFilipino and English; Mathematics Feudal regard for the teacher Very low sense of self-worth as literateand productive individuals Principles vs. practice in views of“kababaihan”
  30. 30. Emergent Literacy Needs - DialoguesLITERACYEDUCATIONHelping their childrenwith homeworkTheir own continuingeducationEMPLOYMENTGetting a promotionUse knowledge inown small businessMEDIAUnderstand the newsbetterOpen Facebook andemail accountsSOCIALOPPORTUNITIESCan answer inEnglishCan share learningsLAWReading aboutrightsSigning contractsUse of relevantdocumentsFUTURE PLANSSuddenly open tooptionsNew plans given newknowledge
  31. 31. Strategies for a Whole Language /Feminist ClassroomDecisions informed by my background inEducation AND Women and Development(fusion of Literacy Worker and DevelopmentWorker) Titles / Names Seating arrangement Scheduling Learners and their agenda – teacher asfacilitator and extender/enabler of their agenda Curriculum design – consultative andparticipatory
  32. 32. Strategies for a Whole Language /Feminist Classroom Learners are part of the decision-makingprocess. As the teacher, I propose, explain, andnegotiate the terms of enabling theiragenda (learning tasks and activities tomeet their needs) with them. We discuss efforts and possible projectsfor their continuous learning. (Currently brainstorming: Mobile Library)
  33. 33. Feedback Marami akong natututunan, kahit natigilang aking pag-aaral. Natutulungan ko ang mga anak ko sahomework nila. Gusto rin nila akongtulungan sa homework ko. Wala pala sa edad ang pag-aaral. Nagagamit ko sa trabaho ang natututunanko. Hindi na ako mahihiya pag Englishspeaking kausap ko kasi masasagot kosiya.
  34. 34. Feedback Ang feeling namin ay close kami sa inyo,dahil nakakaupo at nakakatawa tayo ngganitong nakapalibot lang sa mesa habangnag-aaral. Hindi kami nahihiyang magkamali, okay langmanghula. Mayroong mga gustong sumali noongkinuwento namin ang aming karanasan. Kailangang i-share ang natutunan. Pwede rinpala kami magturo at magshare sa iba. Kailangan ayusin ang pamamalakad at pag-ikot ng library para maraming makinabang.
  35. 35. Challenges Attendance of class members Walang pamasahe Masama pakiramdam / masakit ang ulo Attendance of those who want to join Kasabay ng trabaho / labada Di maiwan ang mga responsibilidad sapamilya Continuity Continuous adjustment of curricula,development of lessons, change in plansand worksheets
  36. 36. LITNUM Program Deliverables Evaluate LITNUM Modules 1, 2 and 3 Conduct a LITNUM Training Program witha group of women from communities Evaluate Module 3 by testing it on thegroup Create LITNUM Module 4 based on thecurrent LITNUM Training Program Make recommendations for futureLITNUM Modules
  37. 37. LITNUM Class vis-a-vis LITNUM Module The expected level of the class does notqualify as an exact match for LITNUMModule 3, contrary to what theparateachers anticipated during the initialmeeting. The group of women had particular levelsof capabilities, interests, needs andexpectations for study which necessitatedplanning specifically for them. There had been constant difficulty locatingand scheduling meetings with formerLITNUM participants for FGDs linked tothe evaluation of Modules 2 and 3.
  38. 38. LITNUM Modules: Initial ReviewThe manuals were very impressive for thefollowing reasons: The CWR used community knowledge andexpertise in the development of materialsand choice of strategies for learning. They drew from the learners’ social contextsand experiences to devise lessons thatespoused social consciousness and justice The LITNUM manuals were developed withinthe social contexts of the learners andaddressed perceived and expressed needs.
  39. 39. Initial RecommendationsTechnical, procedural and logistic(content is superb) Learners’ textbook / workbook / collectionof worksheets + accompanying teachers’manual Integrated lesson plan Provides for the fleshing out of general andspecific objectives, matching these with activitiesto concretely achieve expected learning outcomeswithin target timetables Provides the planning of the continuing study ofrelated, corollary and/or extension topics Record-keeping for Parateachers
  40. 40. Initial Recommendations Future LITNUM Manuals: documentationof decision-making process and rationales diversity of groups and learners’interests, needs, capabilities, priorities, socialcontexts LITNUM Workshops for Parateachers The future establishment of acomprehensive LITNUM Program /Further Education umbrella may facilitatethe assignment of Education practicumstudents to teach the classes.
  41. 41. Working with the CWR The principles and ethics of their serviceto grassroots women are deeplyembedded in their conduct of theorganization and of themselves. On the principles of serving grassrootswomen: They live as they serve, and theyextended the practice of these feministprinciples to us fieldworkers. Consultation was true, not token.
  42. 42. Working with the CWR I enjoyed the full benefits of working with ahierarchical organization with a flatorganization’s behavior and regard. Consultation Confidence, trust Consideration given to one’s specific situation I had many opportunities to observe theirsteadfast commitment to stewardship oversocial justice, vigilance for the oppressionof women, and the calls to action in takingresearch to the grassroots.
  43. 43. References Barton, David and Mary Hamilton. Local Literacies: Reading andWriting in One Community. London: Routledge, 1998. Ducksworth, Vicky and Jonathan Timmons. Contemporary Issues inLifelong Learning. Berkshire: Open University Press, 2010. Fordham, Paul; Holland, Deryn; and Juliet Micillan. Adult Literacy.Oxford: Oxfam, 1995. Gravells, Ann. Principles and Practices of Assessment in the LifelongLearning Sector, Second Edition. Execter: Learning Matters Ltd., 2011. Herrington, Margaret and Alex Kendall (editors). Insights from researchand practice: A handbook for literacy, numeracy, and ESOLpractitioners. Leicester: National Institute of Adult ContinuingEducation, (NIACE), 2005. Hughes, Nora and Irene Schwab. Teaching Adult Literacy: Principlesand Practice. Berkshire: Open University Press, 2010. Jarvis, Peter. Globalisation, Lifelong Learning and the LearningSociety: Sociological Perspectives. Abingdon: Routledge, 2007.
  44. 44. References Knowles, Malcolm; Holton, Edward III; and Richard Swanson. TheAdult Learner: The Definitive Classic in Adult Education and theHuman Resource Development. San Diego: Elsevier, 2005. Medel-Anonuevo, Carolyn. Women Reading the World: Policies andPractices of Literacy in Asia. Hamburg: UNESCO Institute forEducation, 1996. Rogers, Rebecca and Mary Ann Kramer. Adult Education Teachers:Designing Critical Literacy Practices. New York: Lawrence ErlbaumAssociates, 2008. UNESCO Literacy and Non-formal Education Division of BasicEducation. Literacy as Freedom: A UNESCO Roundtable. Paris:United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, 2003. UNESCO. “Understandings of Literacy”. Education for All MonitoringReport 2006.httpwww.unesco.orgeducationGMR2006fullchapt6_eng.pdf Viens, Julie and Silja Kallenbach. Multiple Intelligences and AdultLiteracy: A Sourceboook for Practitioners. New York: Teacher’s CollegePress, 2004.

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