Avoiding plagiarism

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one of my lessons on writing and research, college level

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Avoiding plagiarism

  1. 1. Cindy Cruz-Cabrera about.me/cindycruzcabrera / en.gravatar.com/cindycatz ph.linkedin.com/in/cindycruzcabrera
  2. 2.  Define “plagiarism”  Determine the ethics of avoiding plagiarism  Identify types of plagiarism  Discuss how to avoid plagiarism
  3. 3.  Comes from the Latin word for THIEF, PLUNDERER, HUNTING NET, and KIDNAPPER  “the outright stealing of another person’s ideas”  Just like your belongings, ideas should be treated with exclusivity and respect  Unlike anything for sale, ideas won’t cost you much
  4. 4.  Share button  Attribution  Tag  Dates and timestamps  Creative Commons  Ethics  Internet – easier verification
  5. 5.  Submitting a paper bought from somebody who makes it his/her official business to sell papers  Submitting a paper that somebody else has written, whether you paid him/her for it or not  Copying a paper from a source text without acknowledging the source
  6. 6.  Retweet  RT with comment  MT (“modified tweet”)  Issue: multiple meanings  HT (“hat tip” or “heard through”)  via
  7. 7.  To get good grades  To help out a friend
  8. 8.  Copying materials from a source text with an acknowledgement but without quotation marks  Paraphrasing materials from a source text without acknowledging the source
  9. 9.  Lack of time to check for proper documentation (or simply carelessness)  Lack of awareness about rules for proper documentation  Lack of guidance on the expectations of the academe  Cryptomnesia – false impression that ideas are ours rather than other people’s
  10. 10.  Previous research practices which ignore other academic conventions  Lack of practice in the current requirements of academic research  Other sociocultural considerations  Language constraints: writing experience, kinds of writing done, how well the student knows the language
  11. 11.  The irrelevant reference list  Stolen references  Bad paraphrasing  Use of quotable quotes
  12. 12.  Knowing what to do  Right attitude towards research and academic work  What to do?  SELECT and CITE  CONTRIBUTE NEW IDEAS TO PREVIOUS RESEARCH  CRITIQUE
  13. 13. Requires that you process all your borrowed materials by  Paraphrasing  Summarizing / precis  Quoting
  14. 14.  Acknowledging your sources by mentioning them within the body of your paper and listing them at the end of your paper  Internal  External
  15. 15.  More popularly called “summarizing”  Concerned with the central idea, the core information (rather than the details that support it)  COB – comprehensive, objective, brief  KISS – keep it short and simple  About 1/3 the length of original material  “What does the text say in a nutshell?”
  16. 16.  “In what way can the text be better understood?”  Rewrite the text in order to simplify it  Focus not only on what is said, but also how it is said  Follows the source text point by point, including central idea and details  Breaks information down into manageable units
  17. 17. Requires  Acknowledgement phrase  Parenthetical citation / footnote / endnote  A comment explaining what the quote is about  A QUOTE CANNOT STAND BY ITSELF
  18. 18.  Listing of references  Bibliography  Pertinent information  Author’s name. Title of the Book. Place of Publication: Publisher, year published / copyright.  Ventura, Eloisa. On Your Own: Doing Research Without Plagiarizing. Quezon City: University of the Philippines Diliman, 1999.
  19. 19.  Turabian  MLA (Modern Language Association)  APA (American Psychological Association)  Chicago Manual of Style  CBE (Council of Biology Editors) Citation Sequence System  Number-System Documentation Style

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