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My Hybrid Flipped Learning Environment

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Christopher Allen's teaching philosophy and approach to curriculum design in a hybrid (mixed online & face to face), flipped (lectures as homework, classes as activities) environment while teaching at the Bainbridge Graduate Institute @ pinchot.EDU in the MBA in Sustainable Systems program.

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My Hybrid Flipped Learning Environment

  1. 1. SLIDES: Allen, Christopher (2016, February 10). “My Hybrid Flipped Learning Environment”. Slideshare. Retrieved February 10, 2016, from http:// slideshare.com/christophera My Hybrid Flipped Learning Environment ABSTRACT: “Christopher Allen's teaching philosophy and approach to curriculum design in a hybrid (mixed online & face to face), flipped (lectures as homework, classes as activities) environment while teaching at the Bainbridge Graduate Institute @ pinchot.EDU in the MBA in Sustainable Systems program.” © 2016 Christopher Allen
 LifeWithAlacrity.com
  2. 2. My Teaching Philosophy
  3. 3. MyTeaching Philosophy I prefer to practice and teach collaboration Including skills of participation, engagement, affinity, association, and community My management philosophy is “Manage the environment not the people” Thus I my teaching philosophy is “Create an environment for learning”
  4. 4. MyTeaching Philosophy I teach my students these principles, and I try to use them myself: “Perfection is the enemy of the good” “Ship early and often” “Fail fast” I practice design & system thinking: “Design is the fundamental soul of a human-made creation”
 — Steve Jobs “Transcend the linear and there is the possibility of bringing vision to fruition” — Peter Senge
  5. 5. MyTeaching Philosophy I am a big believer in iteration “Many small iterations is better then a big one” Rapid feedback cycles are essential “Fix sooner then later” “Use both amplification and attenuation”
  6. 6. MyTeaching Philosophy Techniques of Persuasion & Influence are applicable to teaching In particular, Cialdini’s six ethical principles of influence can be powerful Reciprocity Liking Social Proof (Consensus) Authority Commitment & Consistency Scarcity The can be more ethical as they do not require coercion or power
  7. 7. MyTeaching Philosophy It is important to have storytelling elements in my classes Faces & evocative images with emotional context can pull students back into the story I put more effort into beginnings and endings If you get the student’s attention early it is easier to keep it going If you launch students back out with positive energy, it will sustain them until they meet again
  8. 8. My Teaching Cycle
  9. 9. SimpleVersion The simple version is a cycle staring with establishing orientation, then scan, focus,
 act, and ending in reflection
  10. 10. DeeperVersion This is the same model, but with more details derived from aspects of other learning models
  11. 11. Iterative I am a big believer in iteration “Many small iterations is better then a big one” My model is ideally deeply iterative More of a spiral then a circle Rapid feedback cycles are essential “Fix sooner then later” Feedback at multiple levels Session Weekly Learning Module Quarter Cross-Year from Alumni
  12. 12. IterativeVersion A demonstration of the spiral,
 or “TeachingTornado”
  13. 13. Feedback The connections between each circle are important — they are the feedback required to proceed to the next circle
  14. 14. Models I have adopted the use of many teaching, learning theory and team models: Bybee’s Five E’s Bloom’s RevisedTaxonomy Gagne’s Nine Steps Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences Merrill’s Components Davidson’sWheel of Participation Co-operative Learning Habits of Mind Coaching Models Neuro-Cognitive Research Learning Ecology Ladder of Learning Mastery Drexler-SibbetTeam Performance Time-Place Model
  15. 15. Applying My Teaching Model
  16. 16. Work withTAs to make changes to week to address unique needs of this class, update readings & assignments, select from Learning Journals quotes to support learning objectives. Orient » Before Week
  17. 17. Read /View Weekly Readings Do Assignments Post in “Beat” Blog Virtual Meeting Activities ProjectTeam Meetings Read /View Pre-Virtual Meeting Readings Post Professional Learning Journal Entry Act » Thursday – Sunday Focus » Wednesday Scan » Monday-Tuesday
  18. 18. Assess assignment grades and student progress, review kaizen, and reflect on learning journals and student outcomes Reflect » After Week
  19. 19. Review and update learning objectives, review prior year student feedback & “advice to new students”, send survey to one-year alumni, and prepare pre-course student survey Orient » Before Quarter
  20. 20. Collaborative creation of social web site or social video to effect change, iterative improvement and constructive criticism Create a number of forms of social media. Survey of techniques and offer critical discussion on effectively influencing change using the social web Experience the essential tools and techniques of the social web, with both a practical and theoretical basis Act » Weeks 8-11 & December Intensive Focus » Weeks 5–7 & November Intensive Scan » Weeks 1–4 & October Intensive
  21. 21. Iterative improvement, constructive criticism of the course itself. Each student posts a "post-mortem", corrects open documents, offer suggestions on how to improve the course and advice to new students. Reflect » Weeks 12 & After Quarter Review and update learning objectives, review prior year student feedback & “advice to new students”, send survey to one-year alumni, and prepare pre-course student survey Orient » Before Quarter
  22. 22. Weekly Outline Week Subject 1 Introduction to the Social Web: Shared Language and Collaborative Discovery 2 The Social Web Online vs. Offline: Identity, Reputation & Privacy; Personal Brand 3 The Blogosphere, Social Networks & Micro-Blogging 4 Participatory Media: Wiki, Wikipedia, and Collaborative Editing 5 Memetics: The power of Social Video & Viral Media 6 Analytics: Understanding the Audience 7 Motivations for Participation and Change: Ethics, Values, Power and Propaganda 8 Ambient vs. Immersive Media: Video, Podcasts, VR, Online Games, Mobile Apps 9 Social Change Projects (Thanksgiving) 10 Designing and Maintaining Online Communities 11 Scaling Social Change 12 Life-Cycle of Teams, Constructive Criticism, Rapid Iteration, Post-Mortem
  23. 23. CREATING S USTAINING 1. Orientation WHY am I here? 2. Trust Building WHO are you? 3. Goal Clarification WHAT are we doing?? 5. Implementation WHO does WHAT, WHEN, WHERE? 7. Renewal WHY continue? model TM Team Performance Drexler/Sibbet 4. Commitment HOW will we do it? 6. Hig h Performance WOW! Team Performance & Time Place Model How to useTeam Performance Model
 withTime-Place Face-to-Face Virtual Session Asynchronous Face-to-Face
  24. 24. Time-Place & Bloom’s How to use Bloom’s to decideTime-Place Asynchronous VirtualSession Face-to-Face Asynchronous
  25. 25. Learning Cycle & Time-Place Time-Place in the Learning Cycle Asynchronous Virtual Session Asynchronous Face-to-Face Asynchronous Face-to-Face Virtual Session Asynchronous Virtual Session Face-to-Face Virtual Session Face-to-Face Virtual Session
  26. 26. Feedback Tactics The connections between each circle are the feedback required to proceed to the next circle
  27. 27. Crossing Years
  28. 28. CrossingYears Before each year I review with my TAs the previous year’s student end- of-quarter feedback, post-mortem learning journal posts, and “advice to new students”
  29. 29. Advice to New Students Name Redacted “1.Take advantage of the amazing expertise available in the class.Your classmates, some of them, are unbelievably well versed in navigating social media and have been doing it for years. 2…explore the gold mine that is YouTube. In my post-mortem blog post I have links toYouTube videos on how to embed aYouTube video in your blog, how to edit in iMovie, and how to set up Google Analytics.You could start with those.” Sample Slide
  30. 30. CrossingYears Before each year I review the previous year’s student end-of- quarter feedback, and “advice to new students” I also survey the alumni of the course that took the class one-1/2 years ago
  31. 31. Alumni Survey “First off, thanks for reaching out and asking, never heard from anywhere else in BGI since graduating except when they are asking for money… * How have you used the information from our class to benefit your work in the last year? I have helped two companies work on their social media plan, interesting since the culture in Spain is rather different around these tools than here in the US… *What else should we have taught? I also think that the mobile aspect of social media needs to be included with the impressive penetration of smartphones. Finally I believe it would be a great time to have a portion of the class devoted to how social media is used to great big social change (middle east examples).” Name Redacted Sample Slide
  32. 32. CrossingYears Before each year I review the previous year’s student end-of- quarter feedback, and “advice to new students” I also survey the alumni of the course that took the class one-1/2 years ago I survey the incoming students
  33. 33. Who are we? Who are we? There are 34 students: 24 are Hybrid MBA students 9 Auditing 1 is getting a Ph.D., 1 is “choose your own adventure” 19 are 3Year students 14 are men, 20 are women 16 are in Seattle Area, 7 are Portland Area, 7 elsewhere All but 2 are Pacific Time Zone Sample Slide
  34. 34. CrossingYears Before each year I review the previous year’s student end-of- quarter feedback, and “advice to new students” I also survey the alumni of the course that took the class one-1/2 years ago I survey the incoming students And I prepare quotes from the survey to demonstrate student “intent” and to show that we are listening
  35. 35. Participation in Social Media “I want to come away compelled to up my involvement in social media. So far, I have avoided Twitter because I do not have an interest in selling my brand when I have nothing to sell. I don't wish to read about other people's lives or get random updates and add to this social traffic. I fully recognize there are more productive ways to participate, and that's what I'd like to learn more about.” Name Redacted Sample Slide
  36. 36. Using Learning Journals
  37. 37. Using Learning Journals Before eachVirtual session I require a post from each student in their learning journal Describe something important new that you learned last week or is relevant to the current week's topic. Pose a question from one of your readings that would lead to fruitful class discussion — a discussion you are prepared to lead, if called upon
  38. 38. Using Learning Journals I use these Learning Journal assignments in a variety of ways Assessment of learning issues
  39. 39. Blogging Challenges “Some of my challenges were wanting to have enough material to write about. I was also concerned about privacy and how much information I was comfortable revealing about myself online. My largest challenge so far, however, is blogger. I don't like the interface, and it's not functioning like it should.” Name Redacted Sample Slide
  40. 40. Using Learning Journals I use these Learning Journal assignments in a variety of ways Assessment of learning issues Answer student’s unanswered questions
  41. 41. Question: Writing for your Audience “Van Fossen makes a good point about understanding the audience.A post riddled with obscure references can alienate even the most sympathetic audience....However, I feel that changing my writing style would have been a form of self censorship, and would have denied my authenticity, and where is the value in a bowdlerized ( there I go again, sorry), posting from a fake me? Name Redacted Sample Slide
  42. 42. Using Learning Journals I use these Learning Journal assignments in a variety of ways Assessment of learning issues Answer student’s unanswered questions Have student’s answer each other
  43. 43. Answer: Writing for your Audience “In my ‘Beat Blog’ I am writing about ocean conservation. I am not a marine biologist, nor am I an ocean ecologist. I am working hard to present myself as a person who is passionate about ocean conservation issues and at the same time I am attempting to build a reputation in this arena. I want to make a difference in this field, and this weeks reading have taught me a valuable lesson.After reading this week ‘Are you ReallyWriting for your Audience’ I will be mindful about making cultural references that my audience might not understand.” Name Redacted Sample Slide
  44. 44. Using Learning Journals I use these Learning Journal assignments in a variety of ways Assessment of learning issues Answer student’s unanswered questions Have student’s answer questions Sometime answer with answers from previous year’s students
  45. 45. Advice to New Students Name Redacted ! “Trust the process, even the icky parts. Like Nike says,‘Just Do It!’ Take the ship early/often and fail fast messages to heart.You will not die alone under a bridge for having a typo in your blog, an irrelevant comment, or whatever else might have you concerned.”  Sample Slide
  46. 46. Using Learning Journals I use these Learning Journal assignments in a variety of ways Assessment of learning issues Answer student’s unanswered questions Have student’s answer questions Sometime answer with advice from previous year’s students Ask advance questions for guests
  47. 47. Speak With OneVoice Name Redacted “You devote Chapter 4 to "Reinvent the Street Protest." I'd be curious to get a general overview of your thoughts around the Occupy Wall Street Movement and to see what, if anything, you would rewrite in this chapter given the movement's current progress (or lack thereof, given your perspective) Particularly, the idea of "speak with one voice.” Sample Slide
  48. 48. Using Learning Journals I use these Learning Journal assignments in a variety of ways Assessment of learning issues Answer student’s unanswered questions Have student’s answer questions Sometime answer with advice from previous year’s students Ask advance questions for guests Share overcoming obstacles
  49. 49. Privacy Name Redacted “my worst fear came true and it was a "safe test" that my head did not turn around backwards exorcist style as I expected. … I used to hate the whole notion of being "public" on here and in just a few short weeks later I feel empowered enough to let go of self limiting expectations” Sample Slide
  50. 50. Using Learning Journals I use these Learning Journal assignments in a variety of ways Assessment of learning issues Answer student’s unanswered questions Have student’s answer questions Sometime answer with advice from previous year’s students Ask advance questions for guests Share overcoming obstacles Model best exemplars and best practices
  51. 51. A Personal Brand Example “I am a systems thinking educator who brings forward the hopes and dreams of future generations  I am a holistic systems thinking educator I teach by clarifying and synthesizing great knowledge  My True Purpose is to: Educate others to be self-aware, creative, compassionate, systems thinking change agents.” Name Redacted Sample Slide
  52. 52. Using Learning Journals I use these Learning Journal assignments in a variety of ways Assessment of learning issues Answer student’s unanswered questions Have student’s answer questions Sometime answer with advice from previous year’s students Ask advance questions for guests Share overcoming obstacles Model best exemplars and best practices Share Joy & Passion
  53. 53. Demand for Participation Name Redacted “I want to move from Spectator to CREATOR!!!” Sample Slide
  54. 54. Pre-Session Assignments
  55. 55. Pre-Session Assignments Before each session (Intensive or Virtual) I require a selection of pre- readings, slidecasts, videos, or short assignments Ideally I should say something about WHY each selection is important — For instance, I add Keyquotes to readings
  56. 56. SLIDECAST: Allen, Christopher (2010)Slideshare.net. Retrieved from http://www.slideshare.net/ ChristopherA/social- networking-5429019 “BGI & Social Networking” KEYQUOTE: “Networks of only strong ties are not efficient nor robust. Studies show that information diffusion is more efficient through weak ties. More jobs come from weak ties. More relationships come from weak ties. Strong ties breed local cohesion, however, lead to overall fragmentation. Weak ties, often denounced as alienation, are the key to large communities” Sample Slide
  57. 57. Pre-Session Readings Should be about ~1 hour, something that students can do easily I also ask participants to post some first thoughts in Learning Journal During the session I will randomly ask a participant to summarize their thoughts on one of the advance readings I will also quote useful first thoughts from Learning Journals
  58. 58. Power of Weak Links “The strong links in my world are easy to understand and value.Where the readings made a difference for me was in shifting my understanding of weak links. In some ways I have been turned off by the idea of assigning the term "friends" to people I barely know, or who are only connected because we know someone in common. It feels phony and dis-connected from reality..... ….The readings helped me to shift my focus away from the odd choice of words to a more powerful concept that describes varying levels of interconnection, how group size impacts trust and leadership, and the actual power of weak links.” Name Redacted Sample Slide
  59. 59. Virtual Session Opening Circle
  60. 60. Virtual Session Opening Circle Just like during Intensives, we open ourVirtual Sessions with an Opening Circle
  61. 61. Opening Circle In the time before theVirtual Sessions
 start, we do an opening circle
  62. 62. Week 1 Write your name beneath a chair
  63. 63. Week 1 Write your name beneath a chair
  64. 64. Week 2 Put your picture beneath a chair
  65. 65. Week 3 Bring your own chair!
  66. 66. Week 4 Other ways to model a cirle
  67. 67. Week 5 Other ways to circle up
  68. 68. Opening Circle “Circle” models a physical world behavior, reminding them of culture and shared community It is a pre-session exercise, causing participants to be more on time and more engaged at start of session It teaches basic virtual session skills It is an icebreaker that changes mode of thought from viewer to participant
  69. 69. Check In
  70. 70. Check In “Check In” allows the participants in the session to feel listened to and appreciated We ask typically an provocative or inspiring question There isn’t enough time to do this in Collaborate so we use Google Docs You can do this in less then 5 minutes as everyone simultaneously edits We have had many as 75 edit the Check In at the same time.
  71. 71. Check In Type a few words into the GOOGLE DOCS SHARED NOTES a next to your name: a few words on how you are feeling tonight a few words about a topic you are excited to learn about this quarter a few words on something you learned this week a few words about a concern If you comment on someone else, use different colors Sample Slide
  72. 72. Celebrate Acknowledge key check in thoughts
 and positive behaviors
  73. 73. Shared Notes
  74. 74. Shared Notes We also use the Google Docs for Shared Notes It can be useful to ask someone to be focused on Share Notes, but best to encourage all to participate If someone is focused, swap them with someone else after 20-30 minutes People who miss meeting can add to Shared Notes while watching recording
  75. 75. Breakout Rooms
  76. 76. Breakout Rooms OurVirtual Sessions uses Collaborate which has the ability to “break out” into separate rooms, useful for many smaller team discussions and exercises You can bring back whiteboard results from breakout rooms to review in main room Breakout rooms can still participate globally by using the Shared Notes for communication between rooms
  77. 77. Shared Notes between Breakout Rooms Encourage communication and modeling
 of good behaviors in breakout rooms
  78. 78. Slidecasts
  79. 79. Slidecasts I make extensive use of slidecasts (i.e. slides plus audio) These are often used as pre-readings If I lecture during a synchronous session (Intensive orVirtual) for more then 5-6 minutes, I consider recording it for a slidecast I sometimes use sound fromVirtual Session recordings, but quality isn’t as good. Slidecast services are evolving. I convert slide casts to video.
  80. 80. Case Study (breakout): Participation & Engagement Design a highly participatory and engaging group activity (for a class or workshop). Think about: How will you engage the disengaged? How will you get everyone to participate? What are [your] barriers to participation and full engagement? Use Shared notes! Plan on presenting (optionally on your white board) Sample Slide
  81. 81. Breakout Have your 150 word bios handy and ready to read. Take turns in your groups: Read aloud your bio to the group Ask the group: +/Δ feedback? what was evocative? what needs to be improved? Feel free to “copy/paste” your bio into the google doc and so your group- mates can visually see your work as well Sample Slide
  82. 82. Virtual Session Interactivity
  83. 83. Virtual Session Interactivity Ideally every 6-7 minutes A wide variety of techniques Post-It exercise
  84. 84. Post-It – Groups List in the Collaborate G Shared Notes a few your online groups, in particular groups in some way associated with the goals and mission of BGI or you have a leadership role in? (one per line) the group name the number of people your role in each group Photo credit: iStockPhoto Sample Slide
  85. 85. Post-It – Form Write in the Collaborate G Shared Notes for each of your online groups, the form of the group: ME serves the individuals WE serves the group or NETWORK Photo credit: iStockPhoto Sample Slide
  86. 86. Post-It – Inequality Write in the Collaborate G Shared Notes for each of your online groups, the nature of the Participation Inequality of the group: 9-1 90-9-1 900-90-9 Photo credit: iStockPhoto Sample Slide
  87. 87. Post-It – Roles Write in the Collaborate G Shared Notes for each of your online groups, what you would now call your leadership role in the online group? Photo credit: iStockPhoto Sample Slide
  88. 88. Post-It – Size Problems Write in the Collaborate G Shared Notes for each of your online groups, list any group size problems. Sample Slide
  89. 89. Interactivity Ideally every 6-7 minutes A variety of techniques Post-It exercise Quoting Students & Call Outs
  90. 90. Random Pitch You see Jill six months after graduation. She asks, “what have you been up to?” What do you say? 30 seconds! Sample Slide
  91. 91. On Engagement I recently read in an article that disengagement costs 450-550 billion dollars per year in the USA. Companies like amazon will actually be incentivising their disengaged employees to leave. What do you think about this? Do you think it will be effective? Gagan Kaur Sample Slide
  92. 92. Interactivity Ideally every 6-7 minutes A variety of techniques Post-It exercise Many more techniques and exercises are available Book:“75 e-Learning Activities” by Ryan Watkins Book:“The Online Learning Idea Book” Book & Blog:“Game Storming” Website:“Innovation Games”
  93. 93. Kaizen
  94. 94. Kaizen We do a quick Kaizen at the end of every session At Intensives we take about 5-10 minutes DuringVirtual Sessions we use the Shared Notes for Kaizen in about 2 minutes!
  95. 95. Kaizen Type into the Shared Notes : “+” what is working & favorite parts of the class “Δ” what is not working & parts that need changes Sample Slide
  96. 96. Questions? Feedback? christopher.Allen@Pinchot.edu
  97. 97. Bybee’s Five E Learning Cycle Bybee’s learning cycle
  98. 98. MG Taylor’s 5 E’s of Education A varient of Bybee’s learning cycle
  99. 99. Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy To gain mastery, Bloom’s model shows 6 kinds of learning experience, each building on each other
  100. 100. Bloom’sVerbs I like this image rather then the Pyramid — it isn’t always steps, but a cycle.
  101. 101. Definitions Knowledge Comprehension Application Analysis Synthesis Evaluation Bloom’s Definition Remember previously learned information. Demonstrate an understanding of the facts. Apply knowledge to actual situations. Break down objects or ideas into simpler parts and find evidence to support generalizations. Compile component ideas into a new whole or propose alternative solutions. Make and defend judgments based on internal evidence or external criteria. Verbs Arrange Define Describe Duplicate Identify Label List Match Memorize Name Order Outline Recognize Relate Recall Repeat Reproduce Select State Classify Convert Defend Describe Discuss Distinguish Estimate Explain Express Extend Generalized Give example(s) Identify Indicate Infer Locate Paraphrase Predict Recognize Rewrite Review Select Summarize Translate Apply Change Choose Compute Demonstrate Discover Dramatize Employ Illustrate Interpret Manipulate Modify Operate Practice Predict Prepare Produce Relate Schedule Show Sketch Solve Use Write Analyze Appraise Breakdown Calculate Categorize Compare Contrast Criticize Diagram Differentiate Discriminate Distinguish Examine Experiment Identify Illustrate Infer Model Outline Point out Question Relate Select Separate Subdivide Test Arrange Assemble Categorize Collect Combine Comply Compose Construct Create Design Develop Devise Explain Formulate Generate Plan Prepare Rearrange Reconstruct Relate Reorganize Revise Rewrite Set up Summarize Synthesize Tell Write Appraise Argue Assess Attach Choose Compare Conclude Contrast Defend Describe Discriminate Estimate Evaluate Explain Judge Justify Interpret Relate Predict Rate Select Summarize Support Value Bloom’sVerbs There are many lists of verbs associated with each of the Bloom levels
  102. 102. Bloom’s & Learning Styles Mapping Bloom & BloomVerbs
 to Learning Styles
  103. 103. Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy To gain mastery, Bloom’s model shows 7 kinds of learning experience, each building on each other
  104. 104. Bloom’s Domains of Learning Bloom proposes that learning fits into one of three psychological domains
  105. 105. TASC Thinking Actively in a Social Context
 by Belle Wallace
  106. 106. Gagne’s Nine Steps Gagne’s systematic progression of instruction
  107. 107. Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences Different people have different
 approaches to learning
  108. 108. Flow Csikszentmihalyi’s the feeling of complete and energized focus in an activity, with a high level of enjoyment and fulfillment.
  109. 109. Flow Another look at FlowCsikszentmihalyi’s Flow
  110. 110. Proficiency Goals My hybrid model for sharing proficiency expectations. We don’t always need to go to “Doh!” “Duh!”
 Unawareness “Hum!”
 Awareness Unlearned (unconscious incompetence) “Doh!”
 Learning/Change Basic Familiarity (conscious incompetence) Practiced Proficiency (conscious competence) Mastery (unconscious competence) “Wow!” Second Nature
  111. 111. Proficiency Goals Example of overall Learning Objectives for my class “Digital Influence” “Duh!”
 Unawareness “Hum!”
 Awareness Unlearned (unconscious incompetence) “Doh!”
 Learning/Change Basic Familiarity (conscious incompetence) Practiced Proficiency (conscious competence) Mastery (unconscious competence) “Wow!” Second Nature Digital Skills & Online Tools Speak Authentically Influence and Persuasion Affect Digital Influence
  112. 112. Ladder of Learning Mastery Carney’s ladder was about performing magic, but applies to all forms of mastery.
 Roesler adds a lower level.
  113. 113. Competence Learning Model Another model similar to Carney’s but adds the Reflective Competence that is required for teaching
  114. 114. Creating the Problem MGTaylor’s Creating the Problem Model
  115. 115. Tannenbaum and Schmidt Continuum Relationship of the use of Authority to the Freedom.Also resembles teaching.
  116. 116. Associated Thinking Language This builds on the multiple Intelligences model
  117. 117. Merrill’s Components Merrill’s grid of levels of performance level and content tactics
  118. 118. Davidson’s Wheel of Participation Good model for empowering students
  119. 119. Arnstein’s Ladder Davidson’s is based on Arnstein’s, but I don’t like the negativity of the lower levels
  120. 120. Co-operative Learning Davidson & O’Leary of MetaGroup’s
 tactics for collaborative learning
  121. 121. Habits of the Mind Costa and Kallick’s 16 attributes of what human beings do when they behave intelligently
  122. 122. Neuro-Cognitive Research Merrill’s grid of levels of performance level and content tactics
  123. 123. Coaching Models There is a lot to learn from
 coaching models as well
  124. 124. Kirkpatrick Training There is also lessons from corporate training
  125. 125. Kirkpatrick Training A more complex version of Kirkpatrick’s model
  126. 126. Learning Ecology George Siemen’s Ecology of a
 Connected Learning Community
  127. 127. Learning Styles Gregorc 4MAT Concrete Random •divergent •experiential •inventive Type 4 Dynamic •creating and acting •usefulness and application of learning Concrete Sequential •task oriented •efficient •detailed Type 3 Common Sense •think and do •active, practical •making things work Abstract Sequential •intellectual •analytical •theoretical Type 2 Analytical •reflect and think •observers who appreciate lecture methods Abstract Random •imaginative •emotional •holistic Type 1 Imaginative •feel and reflect •create and reflect on an experience Gregorc’s & 4MAT Learning Styles Two interesting learning styles models that are closely aligned
  128. 128. Kolb’s Learning Styles May 2006 version of Kolb’s adds a learning cycle
  129. 129. Myers Briggs Archetypes These personality types affect learning styles
  130. 130. Belbin’s Team Roles This variant of Myer Briggs I find interesting
  131. 131. Maslow’s Heirarchy of Needs A theory of motivation with both basic and social needs. In this variant, mapped to Social Web
  132. 132. Boehm’s Spiral Boehm’s is about product development, but
 has lessons for the teaching cycle
  133. 133. Time Place Model Sometimes also called theTime/Space model, it breaks collaboration tools into 4 categories
  134. 134. Drexler-Sibbet Team Performance This model describes team stages and what is required to move from one stage to next
  135. 135. Tuckman—Forming Storming, Norming, Peforming Tuckman originated much of this in 1965
  136. 136. Hersey and Blanchard's Situational Leadership Related toTuckman, there are interesting connections here about leading that apply to learning
  137. 137. Team Performance Curve Another common model for team performance
  138. 138. Heron’s Categories of Intervention Note that this categories of Intervention are related
  139. 139. Leverage Points This model uses the metaphor of leverage to show how different sources of change affect the outcome
  140. 140. MG Taylor Scan Focus Act My original source for Scan Focus Act, but it originates from before MGTaylor
  141. 141. Ordering Scan Focus Act The order is not necessarily always Scan Focus Act
  142. 142. Creative Process Model First of MGTaylor’s Solution Box
 defines a Creative Process Model
  143. 143. Design Formation Model Second of MGTaylor’s Solution Box
 comes from Architecture
  144. 144. Vantage Points Model Third of MGTaylor’s Solution Box
 comes from Gilbert’s work in management
  145. 145. Solution Box The MGTaylor SolutionBox combines these three models, giving a more complete “meta” picture of the stages in a project
  146. 146. Solution Box Each of the SolutionBox cubes offers a “voice”, i.e.
 “The SolutionBox voice of this document:
 VISION • STRATEGY • DESIGN
  147. 147. Cialdini’s Tactics of Influence Don’t forget that we as educators
 we are influencing students, so use the tactics Commitment & Consistency Reciprocity Liking Social Proof Authority Scarcity INFLUENCE
  148. 148. How to Work Age of Distraction This is something I teach, though
 I don’t believe this list is complete

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