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PANEL
Biopsychosocial and gender
considerations in risk and resilience
pathways of maltreated youth
Presenter 1: Andrea Go...
Child sexual abuse, use of mental
health services and suicidal ideations
in a representative sample of
Quebec high school
...
 CIHR Team on Interpersonal Traumas (PI: Martine Hébert # 103944)
Parcours amoureux des jeunes (PAJ)
Youth Romantic Relat...
Background
 Evans et al. (2005): 128 studies population-based studies
Lifetime suicidal ideations: 29.9% of adolescents
A...
Objectives
 To document the prevalence of CSA, suicidal ideations and
attempts in a representative sample of high school ...
MEASURES
 8 194 students (Grade 10, 11 and 12) from 36 schools across Quebec
 56.3% (n = 4 609) girls and 43.7% (n = 3 5...
Measures
• Items adapted from Finkelhor et al. (1990) and Tourigny et
al. (2008)CSA (T1)
• Items from the Enquête longitud...
Lifetime incidence of suicide ideations
and attempts (T1)
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
Girls Boys
26.7%
18.9%
55.2%
46.5%
No...
Suicidal ideations in the past 6 months (T2)
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
Girls Boys
10.3%
4.5%
23.9%
12.6%
Non CSA CSA
Suicidal ide...
Consultation of health services (T1-T2)
T1 T2
Girls Boys p Girls Boys p
Have you participated in one or more
group meeting...
Consultation of health services
0%
10%
20%
30%
40%
50%
60%
Girls Boys
30.0%
20.6%
52.5%
38.7%
Non CSA CSA
Consultation in ...
Odds ratio of outcomes variables at T1
2.48 ***
3.20 ***
4.35 ***
2.23 ***
3.31 ***
4.69 ***
0 1 2 3 4 5
Consultation in h...
Odds ratio of outcomes variables at T2
2.16 ***
2.56 ***
1.86 **
2.86 *
0 1 2 3 4 5
Consultation in health services
Suicid...
Strengths
Representative sample
Sample included boys victims of
CSA
Longitudinal design
Limits
Global measure of health ca...
Conclusion
 CSA is associated with a 4-fold risk for suicide attempt and a 2-3 fold
risk for suicidal ideation.
 CSA is ...
For more information:
Martine Hébert
Département de sexologie
Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)
email: hebert.m@uqam....
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Wekerle CIHR Team - Biopsychosocial and Gender Considerations in Risk and Resilience Pathways of Maltreated Youth

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Biopsychosocial and Gender Considerations in Risk and Resilience Pathways of Maltreated Youth

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Wekerle CIHR Team - Biopsychosocial and Gender Considerations in Risk and Resilience Pathways of Maltreated Youth

  1. 1. PANEL Biopsychosocial and gender considerations in risk and resilience pathways of maltreated youth Presenter 1: Andrea Gonzalez, McMaster University Presenter 2: Martine Hébert, UQAM Presenter 3: Erica Bowen, Coventry University Presenter 4: Isabelle Daigneault, Université de Montréal IFVCVRC 2016 July 2016
  2. 2. Child sexual abuse, use of mental health services and suicidal ideations in a representative sample of Quebec high school students Martine Hébert, Ph.D., UQAM Canada Research Chair in Interpersonal Traumas and Resilience Amélie Gauthier-Duchesne, M.A. candidate, UQAM Martine Blais, Ph.D., UQAM Francine Lavoie, Ph.D., Université Laval
  3. 3.  CIHR Team on Interpersonal Traumas (PI: Martine Hébert # 103944) Parcours amoureux des jeunes (PAJ) Youth Romantic Relationship Project (YRPP)  Understanding health risks and promoting resilience in male youth with sexual violence experience (PI: Christine Wekerle, # 138302)
  4. 4. Background  Evans et al. (2005): 128 studies population-based studies Lifetime suicidal ideations: 29.9% of adolescents Attempted suicide: 9.7% of adolescents Higher prevalence in adolescent girls  Miller et al. (2013): 52 studies exploring the association between CSA and suicidal ideation and attempt in adolescence Cross-sectional studies of community samples: (27*/28) Studies of clinical or at-risk populations: (14*/16) Longitudinal studies (N from 133 to 1 631): (8*/8) CSA boys may be at higher risk for suicidal attempts
  5. 5. Objectives  To document the prevalence of CSA, suicidal ideations and attempts in a representative sample of high school students in Quebec and explore possible gender differences  Explore the prevalence of consultation of health services and possible gender differences  Document the contribution of CSA, over and above socio- demographic variables, and other adverse life events in predicting suicidal ideations and consultation of health services in teenagers
  6. 6. MEASURES  8 194 students (Grade 10, 11 and 12) from 36 schools across Quebec  56.3% (n = 4 609) girls and 43.7% (n = 3 584) boys  Mean age = 15.4 years  90% described French as the main language spoken at home  78% described their parents as Québecois/Canadian  T1 in-class assessment – T2 (6 months later) in-class assessment  6 780 participated at T2
  7. 7. Measures • Items adapted from Finkelhor et al. (1990) and Tourigny et al. (2008)CSA (T1) • Items from the Enquête longitudinale nationale sur les enfants et les jeunes (ELNEJ) (Statistique Canada, 2007) Suicidal ideations (T1- T2) and attempts (T1) • 4 items adapted from the Add Health Survey (Harris et al. 2009) and Ontario Student Drug Use and Health Survey (OSDUHS; Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, 2011) Consultation in health services (T1-T2) 14.9% of girls and 3.9% of boys reported CSA
  8. 8. Lifetime incidence of suicide ideations and attempts (T1) 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Girls Boys 26.7% 18.9% 55.2% 46.5% Non CSA CSA Suicidal ideations CSA effect *** Gender effect *** 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Girls Boys 8.7% 4.3% 30.3% 19.6% Non CSA CSA Suicidal attempts CSA effect *** Gender effect ***
  9. 9. Suicidal ideations in the past 6 months (T2) 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% Girls Boys 10.3% 4.5% 23.9% 12.6% Non CSA CSA Suicidal ideations CSA effect ** Gender effect ***
  10. 10. Consultation of health services (T1-T2) T1 T2 Girls Boys p Girls Boys p Have you participated in one or more group meetings for a psychological/emotional problem? 5.6% 4.8% ns 6.1% 3.5% ** Have you seen a doctor or a nurse for a psychological/emotional problem? 20.3% 14.7% *** 9.2% 4.0% *** Have you seen a counsellor or community worker for a psychological/emotional problem? 19.3% 8.3% *** 17.8% 6.9% *** Have you been prescribed medication by a doctor to treat a psychological/emotional problem? 3.4% 2.6% ns 3.9% 3.0% ns
  11. 11. Consultation of health services 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Girls Boys 30.0% 20.6% 52.5% 38.7% Non CSA CSA Consultation in the past year (T1) CSA effect *** Gender effect *** 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% Girls Boys 20.0% 9.9% 36.1% 18.3% Non CSA CSA Consultation in past 6 months (T2) CSA effect ** Gender effect ***
  12. 12. Odds ratio of outcomes variables at T1 2.48 *** 3.20 *** 4.35 *** 2.23 *** 3.31 *** 4.69 *** 0 1 2 3 4 5 Consultation in health services Suicidal ideations Suicidal attempts Boys Girls
  13. 13. Odds ratio of outcomes variables at T2 2.16 *** 2.56 *** 1.86 ** 2.86 * 0 1 2 3 4 5 Consultation in health services Suicidal ideations Boys Girls
  14. 14. Strengths Representative sample Sample included boys victims of CSA Longitudinal design Limits Global measure of health care Influence of CSA characteristics (intra-familial, duration, age at first episode) not considered Potential mediators not analyzed
  15. 15. Conclusion  CSA is associated with a 4-fold risk for suicide attempt and a 2-3 fold risk for suicidal ideation.  CSA is associated with a 2-fold higher risk for consultation in health care for psychological/emotional problems. CSA represent high cost to the health care system and prevention efforts are essential.  Assessment of past trauma including CSA should be integrated in health care practices.  Assessment of suicidal ideations and plans need to be integrated in evaluation of CSA youth.  Future studies should explore potential mediators (for eg. coping, attributions, substance abuse, PTSD) in the link between CSA and suicidal ideations as well as the possible protective factors involved (social support from non-offending parents, from peers).
  16. 16. For more information: Martine Hébert Département de sexologie Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) email: hebert.m@uqam.ca www.martinehebert.uqam.ca

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