Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Resilience as outcomes (domains) and processes (pathways, mechanisms)

122 views

Published on

Resilience as outcomes (domains) and processes (pathways, mechanisms)

Published in: Health & Medicine
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Resilience as outcomes (domains) and processes (pathways, mechanisms)

  1. 1. Christine Wekerle, Ph.D. (Clinical Psychology) Associate Professor, Pediatrics, McMaster University (chris.wekerle@gmail.com) Resilience as outcomes (domains) and processes (pathways, mechanisms) Research Focus: Adolescents (age 14+) who are involved in the child welfare system; Maltreatment and Adolescent Pathways (MAP) Project (MAPS: MAP study) Clinical focus: Violence and impairment prevention Youth Relationships Project (YRP; dating violence prevention, dating health promotion program; Manual – Wolfe et al, 1997; Evaluation – Wolfe et al,1997) Populations of interest: Maltreated children, adolescents, and adults; homeless youth; Aboriginal adolescent health
  2. 2. Christine Wekerle, Ph.D. (Clinical Psychology) Associate Professor, Pediatrics, McMaster University (chris.wekerle@gmail.com) Representative Recent Publications: – Wekerle et al., 2009. Impact of childhood emotional maltreatment on teen dating violence. Child Abuse and Neglect: The International Journal – Wekerle et al., 2009. Up Against the Wall report. (distributed by family violence clearinghouse) – Wekerle et al., 2009. Chapter 6: Children and youth served by Ontario’s CAS in Looking to the Future: A Profile of Ontario’s Children and Youth. (for a copy email kathy.glazier@ontario.ca) MAPS Research specific to Resilience • Individual factors; child welfare system factors to look at person-environment interactions
  3. 3. Christine Wekerle, Ph.D. (Clinical Psychology) Associate Professor, Pediatrics, McMaster University (chris.wekerle@gmail.com) Conceptualizing Resilience • Why do some maltreated persons adjust and recover (i.e., innate human self-righting tendency) and others do not? Resilience is a trait, skill, process of individual interacting with environment (multiple contexts, systems) • Individual-level – Adaptation to environment; coping with adversity; returning to baseline (pre-morbid) functioning; achieving at potential; non-problem/non-clinical performance in domains; developmentally-appropriate behaviours; in tact basic functioning (physical, emotional-behavioural regulation) – Sense of Mastery: optimism, self-efficacy, adaptability – Sense of Relatedness: trust, support, comfort, tolerance – Emotional Reactivity: sensitivity, recovery, impairment
  4. 4. Christine Wekerle, Ph.D. (Clinical Psychology) Associate Professor, Pediatrics, McMaster University (chris.wekerle@gmail.com) Individual-level - Measurement Scales • Child and Youth Resilience Measure (CYRM, Ungar et al., 2008) • Resiliency Scales for Children and Adolescents (RSCA, 2006, Prince-Embury, available from www.psychcorp.ca)
  5. 5. Christine Wekerle, Ph.D. (Clinical Psychology) Associate Professor, Pediatrics, McMaster University (chris.wekerle@gmail.com) Resilience as Trait, State, Outcome, Process The way internal resources are matched with external resources: navigation, negotiation, availability/accessibility/use of resources, and luck? System – level: • Children’s Aid Society (CAS) System Involvement Social-level: • Socioeconomic status of family and adolescent • Perception of living environment and school safety • School bullying experiences • Dating violence experiences
  6. 6. Christine Wekerle, Ph.D. (Clinical Psychology) Associate Professor, Pediatrics, McMaster University (chris.wekerle@gmail.com) Resilience-related results:
  7. 7. Christine Wekerle, Ph.D. (Clinical Psychology) Associate Professor, Pediatrics, McMaster University (chris.wekerle@gmail.com) Summary of Resilience-Related References Aboriginal youth: Zahradnik, M. et al., 2009. Knowledge translation in a community-based study of the relations among violence exposure, post-traumatic stress, and alcohol misuse in Mi’kmaq youth. First Peoples Child and Family Review, 4, 106-107. Available on-line @ www.fncfcs.com. Resilience Concept: Ungar, M. et al. (2007). Unique pathways to resilience across cultures. Adolescence, 42, 287-310. Resilience Measurement (Individual-level): Ungar, M. et al. (2008). The study of youth resilience across cultures: lessons from a pilot study of measurement development. Research in Human Development, 5, 166-180. Prince-Embury, S. (2006). Resilience scales for children and adolescents.. www.psychcorp.ca
  8. 8. Christine Wekerle, Ph.D. (Clinical Psychology) Associate Professor, Pediatrics, McMaster University (chris.wekerle@gmail.com) References for diagram: (1) Mohapatra, S., Irving, H., Paglia-Boak, A., Wekerle, C., Adlaf, E., & Rehm, J. (2009). History of family involvement with child protective services as a risk factor for bullying in Ontario schools. Journal of Association for Child and Adolescent Mental Health. Available online: http://www3.interscience.wiley.com/journal/123227924/abstract (2) Wekerle, C., Leung, E., MacMillan, H.L., Boyle, M., Trocmé, N., & Waechter, R. (2009). The contribution of childhood emotional abuse to teen dating violence among child protective services-involved youth. Journal of Child Abuse & Neglect, 33, 45-58. (3) Goldstein, A., Leslie, B., Wekerle, C., Leung, E., & Erickson, P. (under review). A comparison of young women Involved with child welfare and those utilizing street youth services: Implications for the transition from care. Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare. (4) Wekerle, C., Leung, E., Goldstein, A., Thornton, T., & Tonmyr, L. (2009). Up against a wall: Coping with becoming a teen. (Substance use among adolescents in child welfare versus adolescents in the general population: A comparison of the Maltreatment and Adolescent Pathways (MAP) longitudinal study and the Ontario Student Drug Use Survey (OSDUS) datasets). London, ON: University of Western Ontario.
  9. 9. Christine Wekerle, Ph.D. (Clinical Psychology) Associate Professor, Pediatrics, McMaster University (chris.wekerle@gmail.com) Other References: (1) Wekerle, C., Waechter, R., Leung, E., & Chen, M. (2009). Chapter 6: Children and youth served by Ontario’s Children’s Aid Societies. In Profile of Ontario’s Children and Youth, Ontario Ministry of Children & Youth Services Internal Policy Document (2) Waechter, R. L., Wekerle, C., Leslie, B., Goodman, D., Wathen, N., Moody, B., & the MAP Research Team. (2009). Child protection services and university-based partnerships: A participatory action-based model for creating and sharing knowledge. First Peoples Child & Family Review, 4(2), 118-128 (3) Wolfe, D. A., Wekerle, C., & Scott, K. (1997). Alternatives to violence: Empowering youth to develop healthy relationships. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications
  10. 10. Christine Wekerle, Ph.D. (Clinical Psychology) Associate Professor, Pediatrics, McMaster University (chris.wekerle@gmail.com) Other References: (1) Wekerle, C., Waechter, R., Leung, E., & Chen, M. (2009). Chapter 6: Children and youth served by Ontario’s Children’s Aid Societies. In Profile of Ontario’s Children and Youth, Ontario Ministry of Children & Youth Services Internal Policy Document (2) Waechter, R. L., Wekerle, C., Leslie, B., Goodman, D., Wathen, N., Moody, B., & the MAP Research Team. (2009). Child protection services and university-based partnerships: A participatory action-based model for creating and sharing knowledge. First Peoples Child & Family Review, 4(2), 118-128 (3) Wolfe, D. A., Wekerle, C., & Scott, K. (1997). Alternatives to violence: Empowering youth to develop healthy relationships. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications

×