You & Your Family      AgainstAllegations of Abuse             Online Training "Safeguarding"            Foster Parents So...
AcknowledgementWe wish to acknowledge and thank the following for theircontribution, support and encouragement:          T...
WHY Do We Need to Safeguard?   While, for much of the time, foster parents do the same   things that natural parents do, t...
WHY?   Foster parents never think that their family will be the    one that will be reported for possible abuse.    Howev...
FOSTER FAMILIES  CONSTANTLY      LIVE      IN A   FISH BOWL       Online Training "Safeguarding"      Foster Parents Socie...
WHY?   Foster family life is highly visible in the community and    held up to public scrutiny.   Consumers of social se...
WHY?   Societies are concerned about their legal liability    regarding placed children.   Foster children are often "hi...
HOW Do We Safeguard Ourselves?By Providing Foster Parents with:                 KNOWLEDGE                     &           ...
Training Objectives   To identify the reasons and the context for allegations   To develop family safety strategies to p...
SECTION I                  ALLEGATIONS             Online Training "Safeguarding"            Foster Parents Society of Ont...
WHAT IS AN ALLEGATION?An allegation is a statementor suggestion made by anindividual about anotherperson with respect to a...
   The child’s safety is our first concern.   Abuse allegations are serious and must be dealt with    seriously because ...
SECTION II       UNDERSTANDING        ALLEGATIONS          of ABUSE              Online Training "Safeguarding"           ...
REASONS for ALLEGATIONS of ABUSE   Actual abuse has occurred. Actual emotional, physical    or sexual abuse has occurred ...
REASONS for ALLEGATIONS of ABUSE                       (cont’d)   Memories are confused with the present. Sometimes    as...
REASONS for ALLEGATIONS of ABUSE                       (cont’d)   Body language is misinterpreted   Revenge. The child, ...
REASONS for ALLEGATIONS of ABUSE                        (cont’d)   Attention seeking. This is a way of obtaining the    a...
REASONS for ALLEGATIONS of ABUSE                        (cont’d)   The child/youth may want to break the    placement bec...
CRITICAL EMOTIONAL STAGES    THAT MIGHT LEAD TO ALLEGATIONS   Anger stage: Self expression: “I hate this place”. “You    ...
POINTS TO CONSIDER   We tend to interpret our experiences by what    we know and what we have experienced.    Our foster ...
POINTS TO CONSIDER                               (Cont’d)   We see in others what we    expect to see and miss what    we...
CONTEXT FOR MAKING ALLEGATIONS   Isolation   Too few adults   Too many children   Memory chargers   Changes   Access...
This concludes the first portion of theSafeguarding training session.Click on the “Back” button of yourbrowser to return t...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Safeguarding part1

1,736 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Self Improvement
0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,736
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
897
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
4
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Safeguarding part1

  1. 1. You & Your Family AgainstAllegations of Abuse Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  2. 2. AcknowledgementWe wish to acknowledge and thank the following for theircontribution, support and encouragement: Trillium Foundation Ann Dafoe, President of Hastings FPA Canadian Foster Families Association (CFFA) FPSO Board of Directors Children’s Aid Foundation Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  3. 3. WHY Do We Need to Safeguard? While, for much of the time, foster parents do the same things that natural parents do, they have to accept that, in other ways, their task is a different one from that of the natural parents. Unlike foster parents own children, the children in their care do not belong to them. They are held in trust. Having someone elses children is not a natural situation. The Society has ultimate responsibility for the children and is involved in their lives.Note: Throughout this training session the term “Society” has been used to stand for; CAS, Children’s Aid Society, Family & Children Services, FCS Agency, Agencies etc. Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  4. 4. WHY? Foster parents never think that their family will be the one that will be reported for possible abuse. However, there has been a significant increase in reports of allegations of abuse in foster families and it is likely that this trend will continue. Foster families are at greater risk of an allegation than other families. Foster families are held to different, higher standards for what will be considered abuse in their homes. Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  5. 5. FOSTER FAMILIES CONSTANTLY LIVE IN A FISH BOWL Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  6. 6. WHY? Foster family life is highly visible in the community and held up to public scrutiny. Consumers of social services - foster children and their biological relatives - are familiar with child abuse report procedures and effects. Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  7. 7. WHY? Societies are concerned about their legal liability regarding placed children. Foster children are often "high risk" both in terms of the responses they may elicit from others and in terms of the abuse risk they pose for other children Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  8. 8. HOW Do We Safeguard Ourselves?By Providing Foster Parents with: KNOWLEDGE & TRAINING Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  9. 9. Training Objectives To identify the reasons and the context for allegations To develop family safety strategies to prevent false allegations To understand the investigative procedure Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  10. 10. SECTION I ALLEGATIONS Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  11. 11. WHAT IS AN ALLEGATION?An allegation is a statementor suggestion made by anindividual about anotherperson with respect to anabusive behaviour as definedunder the Child & FamilyServices Act. Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  12. 12.  The child’s safety is our first concern. Abuse allegations are serious and must be dealt with seriously because we have given the child the promise of safety. When an abuse allegation is taken seriously the child learns that adults can be trusted. Allegations will happen and can be a learning experience. Crisis causes learning. We need to ask what could I do differently? Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  13. 13. SECTION II UNDERSTANDING ALLEGATIONS of ABUSE Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  14. 14. REASONS for ALLEGATIONS of ABUSE Actual abuse has occurred. Actual emotional, physical or sexual abuse has occurred in the foster family. The abuser could be one of the foster parents, other foster children, natural children or even a visitor to the foster home. Language is misinterpreted. An adults action or expression has been misinterpreted. Children who have been abused, particularly sexually, sometimes misread a situation based on an earlier experience. To the child, an action might seem a repetition of a sequence that was used when he/she was actually abused. Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  15. 15. REASONS for ALLEGATIONS of ABUSE (cont’d) Memories are confused with the present. Sometimes as repressed memories of abuse come to the surface, the child confuses this with abuse currently happening in the present placement. A child’s perception of day to day experiences is determined by their past. Crisis and/or stress can bring out feelings or reactions from the past. Seeing someone who looks like someone from the past can trigger feelings/reactions. These reactions can lead to false allegations based on memories of the past. Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  16. 16. REASONS for ALLEGATIONS of ABUSE (cont’d) Body language is misinterpreted Revenge. The child, or perhaps someone in the childs family, has a grudge against the foster parent or Society and uses an allegation of abuse as a weapon. Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  17. 17. REASONS for ALLEGATIONS of ABUSE (cont’d) Attention seeking. This is a way of obtaining the attention the child seeks. It can also be a cry for help. A child may be getting back at the system. He/she knows that an allegation is easy to make but difficult to disprove. The foster child wants to break a placement, is not listened to, and knows this is a way to ensure a move. Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  18. 18. REASONS for ALLEGATIONS of ABUSE (cont’d) The child/youth may want to break the placement because:  abuse has occurred  he/she wants to go home (various reasons-might want to get back to protect siblings)  he/she believes the placement won’t last (no investment)  might want to be placed in the home of a sibling  believe that no one cares for him or her. Has a history of being unloved by parents and sibs.  conflicting loyalties, desire to please bio parents Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  19. 19. CRITICAL EMOTIONAL STAGES THAT MIGHT LEAD TO ALLEGATIONS Anger stage: Self expression: “I hate this place”. “You are not my mother” “I could do this at home.” Poor Case Management: Placement disruption, or foster parent hanging in for the child. Honeymoon period. Shock denial stage. The crisis: “Do you still love me when I am this bad?” Questioning whether foster parent will still be there for them. Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  20. 20. POINTS TO CONSIDER We tend to interpret our experiences by what we know and what we have experienced. Our foster kids see us as parents. Their past experience with parents was not positive therefore they see us as not positive. Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  21. 21. POINTS TO CONSIDER (Cont’d) We see in others what we expect to see and miss what we do not. Children do this: They see an attitude where there is no attitude. Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  22. 22. CONTEXT FOR MAKING ALLEGATIONS Isolation Too few adults Too many children Memory chargers Changes Access visits School problems Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario
  23. 23. This concludes the first portion of theSafeguarding training session.Click on the “Back” button of yourbrowser to return the Safeguardingmain page to continue Online Training "Safeguarding" Foster Parents Society of Ontario

×