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Wednesday 20th February 2019
14:50
www.openinclusion.com
@openforaccess
Forum on Data and Reporting
UK
Open Inclusion
Chri...
Traditionally,
• economic evaluation has been done quantitatively
• impact assessment of the individual has been qualitati...
Economic pathways analysis can be designed to incorporate both these elements
The “qualitative residual”
• Impact of the i...
CLTV – customer life time value
A/B test of intervention
• Quantitative analysis
• Implementation costs
• People impacted ...
• Ensure the venue is accessible – access/egress, washrooms,
lighting, seating, colours, temperature, few distractions, qu...
• Provide alternate formats, especially for online materials
• Ensure any online surveys or communication is accessible
• ...
• Co-create research with people from each community attending
• Co-design products/services with participants and design ...
Question for the audience
Do you think that the research community is engaging people with disabilities
sufficiently and a...
Insight unleashes the benefits of inclusive design:
Engage more often, engage more broadly
Make each engagement inclusive ...
Forum on Data and Reporting
christine@openinclusion.com
@openforaccess
UK
Open Inclusion
Christine Hemphill
Thank You!
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Zero Project 2019 Data Forum - Open Inclusion

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How research and insight including people with lived experience of disability can be more accurate, impactful and inclusive by design and in practice.

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Zero Project 2019 Data Forum - Open Inclusion

  1. 1. Wednesday 20th February 2019 14:50 www.openinclusion.com @openforaccess Forum on Data and Reporting UK Open Inclusion Christine Hemphill Inclusive research
  2. 2. Traditionally, • economic evaluation has been done quantitatively • impact assessment of the individual has been qualitative Total impact = changed human condition + economic costs/benefits Comparative analysis of change efforts are better informed when these two methodologies are combined. The trick is in how they are measured and combined. Quantitative and qualitative research are better together. Mixed methodology research for evaluating interventions (product, process or policy)
  3. 3. Economic pathways analysis can be designed to incorporate both these elements The “qualitative residual” • Impact of the intervention (+ve or -ve) that is hard to convert to a meaningful monetary value • The field of economics is increasingly recognising the value of qualitative elements Cost:benefit analysis (€/$) • Incurred to implement • Revenue earned • Costs avoided • Discounted over time • Traditional micro economic analysis approach Financial cost impacts are measurable. Human impacts can also be measured, (but not always in £) Beyond cost analysis to impact analysis The “qualitative residual“
  4. 4. CLTV – customer life time value A/B test of intervention • Quantitative analysis • Implementation costs • People impacted (#) • Cost savings over time • Qualitative analysis • Surveys (provider / client) • 1:1 contextual interviews • Focus groups ROI in inclusion (digital) • Quantitative analysis • Implementation costs • People impacted (#,%) • Benefit of impact (CLTV) • Qualitative analysis • Surveys (core journeys) • Usability testing (friction) This is more than an academic, sound theory We use it for projects with clients to help prioritise actions Case studies: ROI for inclusion and assistive technology policy assessment
  5. 5. • Ensure the venue is accessible – access/egress, washrooms, lighting, seating, colours, temperature, few distractions, quiet spaces • Provide maps and travel instructions; easiest routes, known barriers • Include visual journeys to/from main travel hubs and inside the venue • Tell people what will happen, how and why we are doing it • Ensure a support person is on hand to meet people and address their needs during sessions • Give people explicit permission to opt out or take a quiet moment • Support the participant’s broader community It’s important to set up the physical and emotional space so that participants with physical, sensory and cognitive needs feel safe, confident and supported. Making qualitative insight more inclusive - The environment
  6. 6. • Provide alternate formats, especially for online materials • Ensure any online surveys or communication is accessible • Visual design and layout of research materials • Simple, straightforward language and image usage • Explain the context and requirements of research clearly • Make surveys predictable and progress easy to track • Avoid complex interactions and consider total time to complete • Provide captions and audio describe for group environments • Sign language interpreters as needed It’s important to provide information and receive it in a variety of formats and styles to suit everyone’s needs and preferences. Making qualitative insight more inclusive - Communication
  7. 7. • Co-create research with people from each community attending • Co-design products/services with participants and design teams • Involve arts and crafts (ie, create your ideal signage) • Card sorting games • Scenarios, walkthroughs and role-playing • Using props to help elicit stories (magic wand, dice, board game etc) • Allow non-verbal participants to draw or act out their feedback • Provide time, options and space for everyone involved It’s important to allow people to engage with the topic in a way that allows them to consider it and provide the most valuable insight. Making qualitative insight more inclusive - Engaging people and connecting ideas
  8. 8. Question for the audience Do you think that the research community is engaging people with disabilities sufficiently and appropriately to maximise the quality of products, services and policies that are being created?
  9. 9. Insight unleashes the benefits of inclusive design: Engage more often, engage more broadly Make each engagement inclusive for all To improve the design of products, services, environments and policies in overall cost efficiency of design / development, and delivery outcome we need to effectively engage people with lived experience of disability, designing and conducting research to provide timely, quality insight. Inclusive design is better design
  10. 10. Forum on Data and Reporting christine@openinclusion.com @openforaccess UK Open Inclusion Christine Hemphill Thank You!

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