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Inclusive design for connected and autonomous vehicles

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A presentation and short workshop on why and how inclusive design can improve intelligent mobility solutions. This was delivered at Catapult Connected Places in February 2020 at a session with a range of stakeholders on standards for connected and autonomous vehicle design.

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Inclusive design for connected and autonomous vehicles

  1. 1. Catapult Transport CAV 5th February 2020 www.openinclusion.com @openforaccess The genie in the bottle – the power of inclusive design How design of CAVs can include users, enabling increased independence … or exclude them
  2. 2. 1. The power of inclusive design
  3. 3. We design for humans. Humans are fabulously, endlessly diverse. ©Open Inclusion 2020
  4. 4. 4 Design can include or exclude human differences The impact of exclusion on individuals is the same whether it’s deliberate or inadvertent ©Open Inclusion 2020 Intentional exclusion – hostile design Inadvertent exclusion Intentional inclusion Negative intention High intention + awareness + capability Lacking awareness or skill ©Open Inclusion 2020
  5. 5. 5 Emerging technologies can be developed with the needs of currently marginalised communities in mind to reduce barriers. Or it can reinforce them for another generation. ©Open Inclusion 2020 “ I feel privileged to live in a day when digital innovation exists. Technology has enabled my accessibility. With accessibility comes inclusion, and with inclusion comes diversity. I don’t know what’s better than diversity – we are more accepting of people and meeting their needs ” Molly Watt DeafBlind Entrepreneur Member of the Open’s Research Panel
  6. 6. “ Kat Holmes Ex. Microsoft Inclusive Design Current Director of UX Google As innovators you get to define who is included or excluded in future experiences, functionality and society For better or worse, the people who design the touchpoints of society determine who can participate and who’s left out. Often unwittingly”. ©Open Inclusion 2020
  7. 7. 7 Human centered design looks to make things more than functional. Also consistent, intuitive and delightful. The lower in the triangle the design fails for some users, the greater the depth of exclusion. From functional to delightful – for some or for all Functional Reliable Usable Delightful Human Centered Design Increasingexclusion • I delight in using it • It provides a positive moment in my day • It is easy and intuitive to use • I understand it from my perspective and context • It works for me consistently within my contexts • I can use it in the way that I need • It does the job I need it to • It can complete the task it is designed for ©Open Inclusion 2020 Increasinginclusion
  8. 8. 8 The value of inclusive design is both tactical and strategic (short- and long-term benefits) There are 4 major reasons that inclusive design is a strategic advantage as a business 1. Customer Reach / Experience 2. Cost of Development and Management 3. Innovation 4. Risk Management • Include 20% more users with a permanent access need • Include 100% of us as and when our needs arise • Improved usability and experience • Brand attributes • 1% of cost at design stage to understand and include diverse needs can equate to more than 100% of additional cost once live • Economising early on may cost you a lot more than you realise. Inclusive design has more power and less cost when used early • More needs and constraints awareness offers insight to deep opportunities • Solving these opportunities has given us Siri, touchscreens, typewriters, haptics … • It is a legal requirement not to exclude people without a reasonable alternative provided based on disability • Even more importantly, failing this can create major reputational costs ©Open Inclusion 2020
  9. 9. A simple truth. An inconvenient truth. An uncomfortable truth. Inclusion isn’t about “them”. It’s designing for our humanity. Inclusive designs support our variance, today, tomorrow and in the future. ©Open Inclusion 2020 A valuable reality.
  10. 10. 10 Inclusion is a filter that makes the identification of valuable, transformative ideas easier Unmet consumer needs Valuable innovation Emerging technologies and capability ©Open Inclusion 2020
  11. 11. We need a new narrative around accessibility and inclusion Inclusive design enhances creativity and optimizes design impact and value • Inclusion isn’t about them, it’s about us • It’s not a niche. It’s humanity • It’s functional, usable, consistent, reliable, flexible, durable and delightful design that provides experiences we all want, and sometimes or always need • The process of inclusive design catalyses and filters creative ideas • The process allows us to understand the broader range and contexts of use, limiting the opportunity for massive risk and failure and maximizing the opportunity for new value • The process is specifically valuable in less mature technologies where consequences are less well understood ©Open Inclusion 2020
  12. 12. 2. The inclusive design process for CAVs
  13. 13. 13 What users want Open Inclusion survey of older people about personal transport options and CAVs, 2018 13 Access to friends/family, shops, work (paid and voluntary), healthcare providers, entertainment and other daily living needs that provides: • Independence • Safety • Communication and physical design adapted to their needs • Time efficiency (duration, regularity and reliability) • Cost efficiency Not too many new things to learn. Simplicity or consistency. Although “discovering” new challenges and technologies can be a pleasure too. ©Open Inclusion 2020
  14. 14. 14 Open Inclusion’s Inclusion Design Canvas ©Open Inclusion 2020
  15. 15. 15 Open Inclusion’s Inclusion Design Canvas – the details to consider when designing customer experiences Customer Ser iceDigital Ph sical Memor LeadershipProcess Find a s to design inclusivel Search for unmet needs and ne opportunities Generate ne ideas for products and services Challenge ourself to think more inclusivel dentif user needs Test assumptions that are hindering e perience Ensure inclusive design is included from the start Create a better product for all Polic Brand/Marketing En ironmen s Vision CommunicationHearing Mobilit Needs The nclusive Design Canvas is a special tool invented to help users think more intentionall a better service/product for all. The motivation behind the design is to get ou to think through environments and needs to find ne and useful a s to improve people's business e perience through innovative and inclusive design from the start. De terit Learning Blind, lo vision, colour blind, light, colour or motion sensitive ncl ion Can a nclusi e Design Challenge What is the nclusive Design Canvas? ___________________________________________________________________________________ How to use the nclusive Design Canvas? Use the te t from the colour panels on the back of this paper or one card from the stack to find strengths and eakness in our design and prompt questions about our inclusive business environment. Use the nclusion Canvas to follo an inclusive thinking process. Write do n the specific areas here our business needs to improve. Create a more strategic and/or tacticall inclusive offering from the diagram Use the ideas and anal sis of the inclusive design process to improve customer journe s, products, environments and overall e perience. Focus on hat ill make our business better for all Organisa ion Open nclusion is a specialised inclusive research and design agency. From our experience working with clients, Open has created specialised tools and approaches, including this canvas, which showcase our People Measurement Visual design and media, interaction design, access preferences and AT, user assistance, simplicit , hard are and ergonomics Access and egress, a finding and flo , specific use spaces, visual e perience, auditor e perience, products and packaging Helpfulness, business kno ledge, abilit to find/access staff, disabilit and vulnerable customer confidence Advertising, public digital content, customer and sentiment research, other communications, corporate identit , pricing and positioning Speech, articulation including stutter/ clutter/ lisp, aphasia, sign language, lip reading, non-native language or social communication impairments Arm, hand or finger loss or limitation regarding fle ion, function, coordination or strength. Also tremor, pain and significant si e variance Stamina, functional nerve or muscular limitation, limb loss, balance, chronic pain, arthritus, mobilit device users (from a heelchair to a stick or pram) D/deaf, hard of hearing, noise sensitive, tinnitus Acute, chronic, fluctuating or progressive. t can be precipitated b situational, illness, injur or disease factors Specific learning challenges such as reading, numbers or spacial challenges or generalised processing or decisioning challenges Business Written processes E ecutive sponsorship. Recruitment, onboarding Practices Procurement Procurement polic ith LeadershipProcess Test Build Polic Blind, lo vision, colour blind, light, colour or motion sensitive Organisa ion Prod c People Measurement Ask Design Protot pe Speech, articulation including stutter/ clutter/ lisp, aphasia, sign language, lip reading, non-native language or social communication impairments Arm, hand or finger loss or limitation regarding fle ion, function, coordination or strength. Also tremor, pain and significant si e variance Stamina, functional nerve or muscular limitation, limb loss, balance, chronic pain, arthritus, mobilit device users (from a heelchair to a stick or pram) D/deaf, hard of hearing, noise sensitive, tinnitus Acute, chronic, fluctuating or progressive. t can be precipitated b situational, illness, injur or disease factors Specific learning challenges such as reading, numbers or spacial challenges or generalised processing or decisioning challenges Business strateg , ritten polic including staff and customer inclusion polic , marketing Written processes including those specificall supporting customers ith access needs. Processes as shared and embedded into ork flo s E ecutive sponsorship. Board-level discussion. Leadership communication and investment regarding inclusion of staff and customers ith disabilities Recruitment, onboarding and e pectation setting. On-the-job-training and development. Management, recognition and re ard. Formal and informal culture What is counted and hat counts in ho the business is led and managed Practices Tools and s stems. Current staff and customer environments. Product and service design practices Ask a broad range of target users including e treme/lead users to understand the gap. Conte tual needs, priorities and constraints. Create design guidance and a reference group Open to diverse ideas. Co-design. "Ho Might We" questions. Challenge assumptions and biases to get creative Lo fidelit , high fidelit or modular. Co-create. Use a mi of relevent testing. Functional and journe based testing. Sufficientl diverse participant perspectives. Specificall include e treme and lead users Written processes including those specificall supporting customers ith access needs. Processes as shared and embedded into ork flo s Procurement Procurement polic ith relevant accessibilit standards for products and services categories. E plicitl note it in purchase documentation. Test before embedding ©Open Inclusion 2020
  16. 16. 16 Autonomous vehicles have three key environments in which users can be included or excluded 1. External 2. Liminal 3. Internal The experience outside the vehicle The transitional experience, getting in and out of the vehicle The experience inside the vehicle ©Open Inclusion 2020
  17. 17. 17 Our activity How do you think people may be excluded through autonomous vehicle design? 3. Internal: Passengers 1. External: Pedestrians and others 2. Liminality Threshold state Getting in and out Access needs that may be excluded if not considered Sight Hearing Physical difference Sensory difference Mobility Dexterity Cognitive and other difference Neuro- diversity Health, mental health, context User experiences of CAVs ©Open Inclusion 2020
  18. 18. 18 Our activity How do you think people may be excluded through autonomous vehicle design? ©Open Inclusion 2020 Group 2Group 1 Liminality Mobility differences (dexterity and mobility) Group 3 External Sensory differences (vision and hearing) Internal (controller and others) Cognitive and other differences (neuro-diverse, mental health, physical health and other context-based vulnerabilities)
  19. 19. 19 Our activity: What we want to identify and design for ©Open Inclusion 2020 For your needs types and environment, brainstorm all the ways you think people may be excluded and how? Consider § the job to be done (functionality) § contexts, needs and chain concurrences where consistency may be lost (reliability) § how easy, intuitive and learnable the environment is (usability) § the emotional reaction that the environment may convey to users (delightfulness) The first 5 minutes For your needs types and environment, brainstorm all the ways you think people may be included by design and how? Consider § Digital interfaces and interactions, data and connectivity § Physical elements, ergonomics, materials, sizes and adaptive adjustments § Customer service, any human interaction § Brand, positioning, routing options, pricing, marketing, communications The next 10 minutes
  20. 20. 20 A few recommendations from Open’s research and considerations into CAVs • Engage diverse users, particularly those with specific access needs, throughout the design process • Consider ease of use including access, egress and in motion • Provide interaction options – interface input and output, devices (personal / in CAV) • Design the interaction and data exchange for ease of learning and intuitiveness • Leverage universal and adaptive design for physical elements to ensure usability and comfort • Consider full needs of end-to-end journey, including modal changes • Consider the external experience of CAVs to those around the vehicle • Use real-time data such as seat / vehicle availability and route / location to reduce uncertainty • Consider CAV elements embedded in personal mobility devices • Design solutions that cater for multiple co-existing impairments • Design for emotional as well as functional needs • Develop a leading practitioners community for faster sharing and development of good practices and industry standards ©Open Inclusion 2020
  21. 21. 21 CAVs could delight a lot of people who are excluded from suitable, enjoyable transport options today. Let’s help make the next generation of vehicles more inclusive to us all! ©Open Inclusion 2020
  22. 22. Better understanding better solutions better for all Broaden the value Innovate / embed Human-centred design Universal / adaptive ? Inclusive insight Listening / learning Open Inclusion’s services ©Open Inclusion 2020
  23. 23. Broad demographics Ages: 18 - 90 Ethnicity Socio-economic Sexual identity Physical Mobility Manual dexterity Balance Speech impediment Limb loss / loss of function Sensory Blind Partially sighted Colour blind Deaf/deaf Hard of hearing DeafBlind Neurodiversity Mental health Dyslexia/dyspraxia Learning difficulties Cognitively diverse Autism spectrum Language difficulties Other Just older No smell/taste Under 4'11” Over 6’ 3” Major health challenges Complex conditions Chronic pain The Open Research Panel (500 people), our unfair advantage
  24. 24. openinclusion.com@openforaccess better for all Thank you for your time! christine@openinclusion.com 07478 335 028

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