Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.
Carbon quick winsTwo Quick Wins for Cutting    Carbon Emissions(And real life proof that they work)  Ash Gupta, Managing P...
Wind and wave
Wind and waveThe popular focus these days for carbon reduction conferencesis wind and wave power. These are exciting strat...
Light and water
Light and waterOne low hanging fruit for cutting carbon is light.Approximately 20% of the world’s energy is used to genera...
Case study – Dutch dairy farmHere’s an interesting example of what energyefficient lighting can do and the unexpectedbonus...
Case study – Dutch dairy farmThis is a family-owned state-of-the-art dairy farm in theNetherlands.They replaced inefficien...
Case study – Dutch dairy farmThe farmer is expecting a 15% boost in milk production asimproved barn lighting encourages th...
Case study – Dutch dairy farmIn summary• Energy needs immediately down 70% - over 77,000kWh p.a.• Dimmable from 150W to 30...
Case study – fruit import warehousingAnother LED case study: MMD ShippingThey handle 60% of the bananas arriving in the UK
Case study – fruit import warehousingPower rates had jumped from 7.8p to 9.5p in a year andlighting was accounting for up ...
Case study – fruit import warehousingLED performance actually improves in low temperature coldstorage areas. They have low...
Case study – fruit import warehousing                                                              TitleIn summary• Usage ...
Case study – exhibition centreAnother good case study: ExCeL LondonOne of the greenest and most energy efficientconference...
Case study – exhibition centre                                                         TitleSummary of results• Maintenanc...
Case study – multi-storey car parkCase study: Multi-storey car parkCar parks like these need to be lit for safetyreasons, ...
Case study – multi-storey car parkReplacing 200W metal halides with 80W LED low baysproduced a huge difference in light le...
Case study – multi-storey car park                                                                  TitleIn summary• Light...
Water delivery systemsMy other low-hanging fruit for carbon cutting iswater.Pumping, treating and delivering water makes u...
Light and waterThe best arable land is useless without irrigation. Someanalysts predict that water will soon become moreva...
Light and waterIf we just look at our own local water utility in Scotland, itspower consumption is the highest of all orga...
Water delivery systemsThere is a system which uses the differentialpressure between the reservoir and point of deliveryto ...
Water delivery systemsThe main barrier to adoption of such technologies is theinherent conservative stance of many globalu...
Water delivery systemsManila Water Company:In Manila 60% of water is lost through leaks, yet 1 millionpeople don’t have cl...
Once upon a time …Having spent many days now surveying wastewater treatment plants (sewage works, in otherwords), it’s obv...
Once upon a time …I have no doubt that climate change is upon us … you mayhave read of recent evidence that a tropical hav...
The future???
The future???I urge you not to wait 20 years for wind and wavepower energy from arrays deep in the North Sea tosolve our c...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Quick wins for cutting carbon

490 views

Published on

Case studies showing how current technologies can help you cut your carbon emissions with immediate effect instead of waiting for wind and wave power to do the job for you.

  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Quick wins for cutting carbon

  1. 1. Carbon quick winsTwo Quick Wins for Cutting Carbon Emissions(And real life proof that they work) Ash Gupta, Managing Partner The Gupta Partnership
  2. 2. Wind and wave
  3. 3. Wind and waveThe popular focus these days for carbon reduction conferencesis wind and wave power. These are exciting strategicprojects, but take time to gestate and they are expensive at atime of economic austerity.There are two other areas, however, where carbon emissionscan be reduced with immediate effect. They also deliver cuts inenergy cost and use as well as maintenance and – for a reasonthat defies me – they appear to be largely invisible.Could it be that legacy technology investment and those whoservice it have a vested interest in creating barriers toadoption?Let’s take a look at these two low-hanging fruits in the world ofcarbon cutting.
  4. 4. Light and water
  5. 5. Light and waterOne low hanging fruit for cutting carbon is light.Approximately 20% of the world’s energy is used to generatelight.Fact: If the USA were to adopt LED street lights for its nationalhighway network, it could immediately close 43 coal-poweredelectricity generating stations.Meanwhile cash-strapped local authorities, even in prosperouscities like London, are taking radical steps such as switching offstreet lighting to conserve power and save cost. The main resultis added risk in our urban places for health, safety and security.So why not take a different approach to lighting? This series ofcase studies will show what is possible.
  6. 6. Case study – Dutch dairy farmHere’s an interesting example of what energyefficient lighting can do and the unexpectedbonuses it can deliver.
  7. 7. Case study – Dutch dairy farmThis is a family-owned state-of-the-art dairy farm in theNetherlands.They replaced inefficient high pressure sodium lighting runningat 480W with LED high bays at 150W to cut energy needs.They reduced energy use even further by being able to dim theLEDs from 150W to 30W.But that’s not all. What about these extra bonuses?
  8. 8. Case study – Dutch dairy farmThe farmer is expecting a 15% boost in milk production asimproved barn lighting encourages the cows to produce moremilk*LEDs produce no UV, so flies are not so attracted by the light.A better light level allows the barn to be kept cleaner and animalhealth checks are easier.There’s no light pollution, as LED light output is directionallycontrolled.* A study performed by the Research Institute for Animal Husbandry
  9. 9. Case study – Dutch dairy farmIn summary• Energy needs immediately down 70% - over 77,000kWh p.a.• Dimmable from 150W to 30W to save even more• CO2 emissions down 42 tonnes• 1.5 year payback – 100% return in 18 months• Milk yield 15% up
  10. 10. Case study – fruit import warehousingAnother LED case study: MMD ShippingThey handle 60% of the bananas arriving in the UK
  11. 11. Case study – fruit import warehousingPower rates had jumped from 7.8p to 9.5p in a year andlighting was accounting for up to 15% of the company’stotal electrical consumption.MMD Shipping replaced its 400W high pressure sodiumlights with 150W LED high bays and will see payback inless than 2 years.Lighting is improved and so is worker safety.LEDs last for 60,000+ hours continuous use and carry a5-year warranty, so no more maintenance – goodbye toits disruption and the need for a scissor lift for replacingfailed lights.
  12. 12. Case study – fruit import warehousingLED performance actually improves in low temperature coldstorage areas. They have low heat output, so the cold storelocker runs more efficiently with less refrigeration demand tomaintain optimum temperature.Combining with occupancy sensors means the fixtures aretypically on for only 30% of the time instead of the 24/7 burntime common with other conventional lighting solutions likemetal halide or HPS.No UV rays emitted which might speed deterioration of thefruit.20% Enhanced Capital Allowance scheme sweetened the deal– UK companies that invest in energy-efficient equipment andmachinery can write off the entire expense in year one.
  13. 13. Case study – fruit import warehousing TitleIn summary• Usage down from 24/7 to just over 7 hrs/day• No more maintenance• Payback in 1.2 years, so MMD rolled out LED lighting toits other facilities• Power needs across 11 facilities down from 1.66millionkWh to 176,000 kWh p.a.• CO2 emissions down 806 tonnes p.a.
  14. 14. Case study – exhibition centreAnother good case study: ExCeL LondonOne of the greenest and most energy efficientconference centres in the world.ExCeL opted for LED lighting in its preparationfor hosting some of the events during the 2012Olympics.
  15. 15. Case study – exhibition centre TitleSummary of results• Maintenance needs eliminated• Lighting energy use down by 68%• Payback in 1.8 years• CO2 emissions down by 180 tonnes p.a.
  16. 16. Case study – multi-storey car parkCase study: Multi-storey car parkCar parks like these need to be lit for safetyreasons, but they’re guzzling power and the lightfrom the metal halides is still bad.
  17. 17. Case study – multi-storey car parkReplacing 200W metal halides with 80W LED low baysproduced a huge difference in light level – like nightand day.Sturdy LED lights can also take the frequent knocksfrom the gear on top of the news trucks that used tocause never-ending maintenance due to the fragilityof the metal halides.
  18. 18. Case study – multi-storey car park TitleIn summary• Lighting difference like night and day• Annual replacement of lights no longer needed• Energy use down by 62% , even without using proximitysensors• Payback in 1.7 years• CO2 emissions down by 60 tonnes
  19. 19. Water delivery systemsMy other low-hanging fruit for carbon cutting iswater.Pumping, treating and delivering water makes upno less than 12.6% of US energy consumption.*But water also has the potential to generateelectricity …*according to researchers at the University of Texas atAustin
  20. 20. Light and waterThe best arable land is useless without irrigation. Someanalysts predict that water will soon become morevaluable than land.Where water delivery systems exist and we find not onlythe propensity for water flow due to gravity but latentpower derived from differential pressure within waterdeliver networks, there is an enormous untapped energypotential. This energy can offset the massive powerconsumption typical of most water utilities.
  21. 21. Light and waterIf we just look at our own local water utility in Scotland, itspower consumption is the highest of all organisations in thecountry - approximately 500,000* Megawatt hours peryear, more than 1.5% of electricity consumed in Scotland in2008.The ability to generate substantial amounts ofpower, sometimes in remote locations, and then to store thisenergy provides a distributed energy solution, and not only forthe utility’s own use.It can also benefit fragile distant communities, sometimes farfrom national gridlines, whether in alpine regions or mountaincatchment areas; wherever these are, electricity can begenerated and carbon offsets gained.*http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2010/12/14111932/4
  22. 22. Water delivery systemsThere is a system which uses the differentialpressure between the reservoir and point of deliveryto generate electricity.By introducing a turbine with software thatintelligently controls the power previously dissipatedinto the ground as heat by pressure reducingvalves, it delivers a constant flow of energy startingat 60kW.This smart solution can be re-configured from mini-turbines that can generate power for storage for useat household scale through to industrial strengthsolutions for industry and commerce.
  23. 23. Water delivery systemsThe main barrier to adoption of such technologies is theinherent conservative stance of many globalutilities, especially when times are tough as they are nowand investment opportunities very carefully selected.Imagine combining such systems with the intelligentmonitoring capability of systems developed by companieslike i2o, so that you are not only generating power, but youcan now tell where the system is leaking. Here’s anexample …
  24. 24. Water delivery systemsManila Water Company:In Manila 60% of water is lost through leaks, yet 1 millionpeople don’t have clean drinking water. (What’s thebetting they don’t have power either???)In one Malaysian installation the i2o system cut 40% ofoperation costs for finding and fixing leaks. At the sametime this resulted in 40% less disruption to traffic due to areduction in the need for road works.
  25. 25. Once upon a time …Having spent many days now surveying wastewater treatment plants (sewage works, in otherwords), it’s obvious to me that water deliverysolutions are not as exciting and sexy forinvestment as wave power generators forexample.And electric light is just something we take forgranted.But I hope I have shown that both water andlight can help us reduce our carbon emissionsand bring extra benefits if we take the righttechnological approach.
  26. 26. Once upon a time …I have no doubt that climate change is upon us … you mayhave read of recent evidence that a tropical haven onceexisted where the chill North Sea now lies.Imagine you had a villa in Marrakech or Cap d’Antibes –your perfect heavenly hideaway, then picture what youmight see post climate change…
  27. 27. The future???
  28. 28. The future???I urge you not to wait 20 years for wind and wavepower energy from arrays deep in the North Sea tosolve our carbon problems.We can already cut our carbon footprint, save electricityand generate power for substantially less cost usingtechnologies and engineering techniques that arecommonplace and ubiquitous. And I hope you’ve seenthat they can bring some added bonuses along theway.Thank you for watching.

×