Photography ppt

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Photography ppt

  1. 1. The World of 3-D<br />Math using 3-Dimensional Shapes<br />
  2. 2. There are 3 cubes, 2 pyramids, 4 cylinders, 2 cones, and 2 rectangular prisms. <br />How many cones, cylinders, and cubes are there all together?<br />
  3. 3. Hint<br />There are _____ cones<br />There are _____ cylinders<br />There are _____ cubes<br />
  4. 4. Answer<br /><ul><li>There are 2 cones
  5. 5. There are 4cylinders
  6. 6. There are 3 cubes</li></ul> 2<br />+ 4<br />+ 3<br />--------<br />9<br />There are 9 shapes total.<br />
  7. 7. The boys have 9 balls out on the field. Two of the balls are hit over the fence.<br />How many balls do the boys have left?<br />
  8. 8. Hint<br />
  9. 9. Answer<br /> 9<br /><ul><li>2</li></ul>--------<br />7<br />There are 7 balls left.<br />
  10. 10. There are 4 teams playing football on the field when the ice cream man comes by. One of the parents wants to buy ice cream cones for everyone. <br />How many ice cream cones will the parent need to buy if each team has 2 players?<br />
  11. 11. Hint<br />
  12. 12. Answer<br />The parent will have to buy 8 ice cream cones.<br />
  13. 13. Mrs. Smith went to the store and bought 15 cans of food. There are 3 people she is giving the cans to. Each person gets the same amount of cans.<br />How many cans will each person get?<br />
  14. 14. Hint<br />
  15. 15. Answer<br />Each person will get 5 cans of food.<br />
  16. 16. Standards<br />M1G1. Students will study and create various two and three-dimensional figures and identify basic figures (squares, circles, triangles, and rectangles) within them. <br />b. Build, represent, name, and describe cylinders, cones, and rectangular prisms. <br />M1N3. Students will add and subtract numbers less than 100, as well as understand and use the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction. <br />c. Compose/decompose numbers up to 10 (e. g. 3+5=8, 8=5+2+1). <br />d. Understand a variety of situations to which subtraction may apply: taking away from a set, comparing two sets, and determining how many more or how many less. <br />e. Understand addition and subtraction number combinations using strategies such as counting on, counting back, doubles and making tens. <br />f. Know the single-digit addition facts to 18 and corresponding subtraction facts with understanding and fluency. <br />

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