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Health & Safety
Policy
The Chiltern Lift Company Ltd
ALL TYPES OF LIFT INSTALLATIONS, SERVICING, REFURBISHMENT AND REPAIRS
8 FURLONG ROAD, BOURNE END, BUCKS, SL8 5DG www.chilternlifts.co.uk
T: 01628 529247 F: 01628 810821 E: enquiries@chilternlifts.co.uk
Issue 1.5 - January 2013 © The Chiltern Lift Company Limited 2013
2
The Chiltern Lift Company Limited
Health & Safety Policy
Section One
Statement
3
Statement of Policy
The policy of The Chiltern Lifts Co Ltd is to ensure a safe and healthy workplace at
all times in all aspects of our business. We aim to minimise the risk of harm so far as
is reasonably practicable, to both people and the environment throughout the life-
cycle of our goods and/or services.
As Director it is my belief that Health, Safety and Environmental (HS&E) issues are a
management responsibility of equal importance as Quality and Service. As a
company we are committed to achieving our policy aim and will ensure an effective
system for planning, organising, controlling, monitoring and reviewing of the
preventive and protective measures associated with our business. As a minimum
standard we will comply with the appropriate legislation.
In particular we are committed to ensuring:
(a) the provision and maintenance of plant and systems of work that are, so
far as is reasonably practicable, safe and without risks to health;
(b) arrangements for ensuring, so far as is reasonably practicable, safety and
absence of risks to health in connection with the use, handling, storage and
transport of articles and substances;
(c) the provision of such information, instruction, training and supervision as
is necessary to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the Health &
Safety at work of employees;
(d) so far as is reasonably practicable as regards any place of work under
our control, the maintenance of it in a condition that is safe and without risks
to health and the provision and maintenance of means of access to and
egress from it that are safe and without such risks;
(e) the provision and maintenance of a working environment that is, so far as
is reasonably practicable, safe, without risks to health, and adequate as
regards facilities and arrangements for welfare at work.
We will employ the following principles in seeking to achieve our aim
(a) avoiding risks
(b) evaluating identified risks which cannot be avoided
(c) combating risks at source
(d) adapting work to the individual, especially as regards the design of
workplaces, the choice of work equipment and the system of work
(e) adapting to technical progress;
(f) replacing the dangerous by the non-dangerous or the less dangerous;
(g) developing a coherent overall prevention policy which covers technology,
organisation of work, working conditions, and the influence of factors relating
to the working environment;
(h) giving collective protective measures priority over individual protective
measures; and
(i) giving appropriate instructions and information to employees.
This policy will be monitored throughout the year and reviewed at least every 24
months.
Signed: S. Festorazzi Date: 10/01/2014
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The Chiltern Lift Company Limited
Health & Safety Policy
Section Two
Organisation
5
Section 2: Organising
Health and Safety Structure- Chiltern Lift Co.
The Managing Director
Role : To develop and achieve the policy aims.
Responsibilities:
o Responsible for all aspects of HS&E in respect of Chiltern Lifts.
o He will
o receive advice through the Quality Manager and external sources including
HSE, British Standards, and recognised professional institutions (LEIA)
o Chair the Safety Management Group.
o Ensure the agreed safety plan is adequately resourced , monitored and
implemented.
Managing
Director
Technical /
Operations
Director
Quality /Safety
Manager
Domestic Co-
ordinator
(premises)
Lifts Co-
ordinator (Site)
Trained Fitters
& assistants
Sub-Contractors
Tester
Snr Engineers &
assistants
6
Quality and Safety Manager:
Role: The Quality manager will ensure that the policy is implemented effectively on a
day-to-day basis.
Responsibilities:
o Advise the MD on HS&E issues / performance
o Liaise with appropriate external sources.
o Monitor implementation of policy at local and company level
o Provide advice and guidance within his competency to staff / management.
Seek external advice as appropriate.
o Identify and create relevant performance standards.
o Maintain the relevant H&S documentation, ensuring documentation is
reviewed at appropriate intervals and up to date.
o Provide reports and information to the Safety Management Group.
o Undertake all necessary reporting internally / externally – including any
accidents.
o Investigate accidents / incidents and make the necessary reports.
o Compile relevant statistics, including accident figures, for consideration by the
Safety Group.
o Monitor training and competency- identify and arrange additional training as
required.
o Ensure changes in legislation and compliance issues are adequately
addressed.
o Issue / Withdraw as appropriate any changes in procedures, minutes of
formal discussions etc as per the controlled documents system
o Consult with all relevant parties as appropriate.
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Domestic Lift Co-ordinator:
Role:
Ensure appropriate HS&E standards on all domestic premises works
Responsibility:
o Ensures a safe system of work is identified
o A safe system of work is a formal procedure, resulting from a risk
assessment, which specifies safe methods of work to ensure that relevant
hazards are eliminated and the remaining risks are minimised.
o Liaison with client and agree necessary precautions and safe method of
working.
o Ensure appropriate arrangements for disposal of waste associated with
projects.
o Document agreed safe working method
o Ensure on-site staff are competent
o Safety of all tools / plant / equipment is suitable and in good condition
o Meet internal company standards
o Consult with Quality Manager and other relevant parties as necessary.
Lift Co-ordinator
Role: Ensure effective HS&E standards on all working (non-domestic) sites.
Responsibilities:
o Ensures a Safe System of Work for all (non-domestic) sites.
o A safe system of work is a formal procedure, resulting from a risk
assessment, which specifies safe methods of work to ensure that relevant
hazards are eliminated and the remaining risks are minimised.
o Liaison with client / principal contractor as necessary and agree precautions
and safe method of working.
o Ensure appropriate arrangements for disposal of waste associated with
projects.
o Document agreed safe working method
o Ensure on-site staff are competent
o Safety of all tools / plant / equipment is suitable and in good condition
o Meet internal company standards
o Consult with Quality Manager and other relevant parties as necessary.
o Where CDM applies:
8
o Where Chiltern Lifts is the principal contractor ensure appropriate
notifications.
o Appoint the necessary co-ordinator.
o Develop the H&S plan
o Ensure Client is briefed on responsibilities
o Develop and maintain the H&S file.
o Make the H&S file available as appropriate.
Tester:
Role: To exercise professional judgement on the standard of work produced by on-
site staff and sub-contracted labour.
Responsibility:
o To maintain his personal professional standards and competence at all times.
o To undertake rigorous compliance checks against current agreed standards.
(The Tester will ensure that all personnel are familiar with and suitably tested
against the appropriate safe method of working - in particular to meet the
relevant BS 7255:2001 (as amended).)
o To make and provide reports as appropriate
o To highlight any concerns through the appropriate channels. (Client / Quality
Manager / Lift Co-ordinator)
o To advise on any defect or remedial actions required as necessary.
Fitters & Assistants / Senior Engineers / Sub-contractors.
Role: To carry out work as per the agreed safe system of work
Responsibilities.
o To work to the agreed standards using the safe working method
o To report any concerns regarding HS&E they might have on-site
o Only to undertake works which are safe and does not expose himself or
others to uncontrolled risks.
o In the event of an accident, ensure the area is made safe and immediately
report the accident to the Office.
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General Responsibilities of Employees:
o All employees have a responsibility to take reasonable care of themselves
and others who may be affected by their acts or omissions at work.
o They must co-operate with Supervisors and Managers to achieve a healthy
and safe work place, including using any personal protective equipment or
other measures supplied for H&S purposes
o They must not interfere with or misuse anything provided under the statutory
provisions for the health, safety and welfare of employees.
o They must report any deficiencies or concerns in respect of Health & Safety
arrangements to any Director or the company Safety Advisor. This may be
done either directly or using the internal email system. Any written issue
raised as an item will be responded to by the appropriate manager as a
priority. (Within 1 working day from date of receipt)
As necessary:
o Assist in accident investigation so that measures can be introduced to prevent
recurrence.
o Familiarise themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions and
guidance notes contained in the booklet "Safety In Working On Lifts And
Escalators" received by all company employees or available in the company
Health and Safety Register.
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Controls
Onsite:
All work is to be strictly controlled by a safe working method (safe system of work)
based on a thorough assessment of risks in compliance with BS EN 81 80 2003.
A safe system of work is a formal procedure, resulting from a risk assessment, which
specifies safe methods of work to ensure that relevant hazards are eliminated and
the remaining risks are minimised.
The appropriate risk control measures will be identified and implemented for all
activities involving significant residual risks. While generic assessments may be used
as the basis of a risk assessment – each site / project must be considered in its own
right and controls identified accordingly.
Communications
Requirements:
The HSWA 1974, s.2 (2) (c) requires “the provision of such information, instruction
and supervision as is necessary...”, and s.2 (6) requires employers to consult
representatives over arrangements which will enable the employer and employees to
co-operate effectively.
Reg. 10 of MHSWR 1999 requires employers to provide employees with
comprehensible and relevant information on risks to their health and safety,
preventive and protective measures, and emergency procedures.
Generally
Chiltern Lift Co. benefits from effective communications due to its size and structure.
Communications are largely direct and informal.
Staff are encouraged to discuss issues with colleagues and this happens on a daily
basis. Any H&S concerns may be brought to the attention of a supervisor / manager
for their attention. (See below Urgent / Non urgent H&S issues).
Formal Communications
Work activity is governed by an approved Quality Control system. This is to be
followed at all times in terms of ensuring that all personnel are clear on working to the
agreed standard within the agreed safe system of work.
Any formal communications e.g.
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o Minutes of meetings
o Policy changes
o Procedures revisions / forms etc
must be recorded and entered onto the system for records purposes. As appropriate
staff are to be informed and where necessary inducted in e.g. any change of system
of work, or the use of / introduction of new equipment.
The Quality / Safety Manager will issue the necessary controlled documentation if
appropriate. Staff may also formally report an issue which they consider to be either
hazardous or a deficiency in the H&S system. The details should be made in writing
and addressed to the Managing Director or in his absence the Quality and Safety
Manager who should respond within 3 working days.
Consultation with Employees
Where there is likely to be a significant change in working practices affecting the
Health & Safety of staff, the Safety Group will consult as appropriate. This may be by
emailing or by asking for input from staff, or invitation to attend at the Safety
Management Group meeting.
The Safety Management Group meeting will be the forum covering:
o New systems of work
o New technology
o Appointment of external contractors
o Environmental issues
o Risk control systems
o Compliance issues
o Health & Safety training
o Purchasing
and any other topic affecting health safety or the environment.
Staff are encouraged to report any H&S concerns they have. If there is a specific
issue which a member of staff believes should be addressed it should be raised in
the first instance with their supervisor / manager, and / or discussed with the
company Quality & Safety Manager.
Non-Urgent Issues
Staff are encouraged to draw attention to any defects in the health and safety system
or operational standards, or make suggestions as to how they might be improved.
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Any non-urgent perceived shortcomings in provisions for health, safety and welfare
must be reported through line management and include the Quality / Safety
Manager. This can be done in writing (see Hazard report form – Appendix 1 below)
or reported through the Office. Any formal communication received for H&S purposes
must be addressed and an initial written response, which can include email, made
within 3 working days by the appropriate manager.
Urgent H&S issues
Any urgent issues must be immediately drawn to the attention of a supervisor,
manager or director of the company who will address the issue as appropriate. This
is a requirement on all staff and sub-contractors. Urgent issues include anything that
could cause imminent harm.
Statutory Notices
In accordance with the provisions of the Health & Safety (Consultation with
Employees) Regulations 1996, a poster informing employees in general terms about
the requirements of Health & Safety law will be displayed in the main company
office on the notice display board.
This information will be issued in leaflet form for employees who work away from the
premises. Employees are required read the information contained in the poster or
leaflet carefully, as it describes the key points of the duties of the employer and
employee respectively under the laws relating to Health & Safety. Employees will be
expected to sign a register accepting that this information has been made readily
available and if necessary explained to them.
Information is also provided on the local addresses of the enforcing authority for
Health & Safety law.
The Local Authority Environmental Health Department is to be found at:
Environmental Health Department
Buckinghamshire County Council
Civic Centre
Walton Street Tel: 01296 395000
Aylesbury HP20 1UX www.buckscc.gov.uk
The Employment Medical Advisory Service (EMAS) can be contacted at:
European Medical Advisory Service (EMAS)
109 Bancroft Tel:
Hitchin www.emas-medical.com
Herts SG5 1NB
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Safety Management Group
The purpose of the Safety Management group is to plan, implement, monitor and
review the policy.
It is the primary vehicle through which the company policy aims are to be achieved.
It will draw up an annual safety plan, based on its stated aims against risk-based
priorities. It will meet every 12 weeks to monitor and review Health & Safety
performance in achieving policy aims. Minutes of key issues and actions should be
held. The Group should prepare an annual report for the Board of Directors.
The Safety Management Group will consist of: (confirm with CLC).
The Managing Director,
The Quality & Safety Manager
The Operations Manager
The Lift Co-ordinator
A Tester
Additional representative by invitation
To this end it will consider:
The safety Plan
Feedback from Projects including site inspections.
Incidents occurring
Office based issues including inspections
Safety Management
Group
Plant, Equipt Tools
Purchasing ; Sub-
contractors
Procedures
Training
Reporting
Policy / Planning
Responsibilities
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Environmental issues including storage and disposal of waste
Training and Development – including first aid / CSCS cards / Management
training
Compliance checks – e.g. changes in British Standards
Policy / Consultation issues
Company aims
Legal developments
Any other issues as may be appropriate.
This meeting may also be used to update managers on professional issues by
means of a briefing given by one of the team. Notes of the meeting will be made and
made available for all staff.
Site Safety Meetings
Where The Chiltern Lift Co is a sub-contractor on a site. Any general safety meetings
on site in respect of trade contractors will be attended by the on-site supervisor or the
manager responsible for the day to day management of Health & Safety for the
duration of the contract. Other meetings will be attended as agreed within the H&S
plan.
Training / Information
Induction for Staff
1. The policy document is to be readily available to all staff. Essential H&S
information will be explained to any new member of staff, including temporary staff
and any particular systems of work or particular issues discussed before work
commences. A record is to be held of any such training.
2. As appropriate, risk assessments are to be completed in respect of the work being
undertaken, and any necessary control measures discussed and implemented. This
will include training or equipments needs.
3. The responsible Supervisor or Manager will explain and discuss the policy as
relevant to the employee’s work, to ensure understanding. New staff will be
positively supported throughout their period of probation and are encouraged to raise
any H&S issues with their colleagues and / or line manager.
4. A review will be undertaken by the relevant Line Manager or Supervisor within a 3
month period. Where further training or related safety needs are identified these are
to be agreed and met within a reasonable timescale.
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Sub-Contracted Labour:
Depending on the site and the project requirements, induction training on site will
follow the Principal Contractor’s requirements. As a minimum sub-contractors are to
be briefed on:
Fire safety
First aid
Welfare facilities
PPE requirements and
Specific risk control measures as identified from the assessment process.
Where any changes occur to these, supervisors should confirm that the changes
have been clearly understood by staff. Particular attention is to be paid to any sub-
contractor who may not have English as a first language.
General Training
Health & Safety training will be provided as agreed through the Safety Group and
with the Quality and Safety Manager. The Safety Group retain the overview of
developments in technical and associated issues and must identify where particular
training may be required to maintain professional competencies throughout.
Regular safety briefings by a nominated person on Health & Safety matters including
changes in legislation, government campaigns or significant developments are
advised.
Office Staff
Health & Safety training to Staff will take place as agreed through the Safety Group
and arranged by the Quality and Safety Manager.
In-house training should include
o Fire safety
o Workstations
o Manual handling
Where external training is required, e.g. CSCS , first aid certificate, this well be
supplied as required.
All members of staff will be updated on any changes in the Health & Safety
management system in both written, (email) and verbal format as changes occur.
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On-Site Information / Induction
On larger (CDM) projects induction information may be provided by the Principle
Contractor, prior to the commencement of work on site. (See above: ‘Sub-contracted
labour’) This will act as ‘Day 1’ induction briefing / tool-box talk. Should this not take
place the following information must be made clear to all Chiltern Lift Co. staff:
o The layout of the site,
o Fire precaution devices,
o Fire exit routes,
o Welfare facilities
o Permit to Work System (as appropriate)
The workplace itself must be shown to new personnel and any hazards pointed out
with the measures in place to control risks.
Where changes occur to any of the above, staff are to be updated.
Method Statements:
Staff, including sub-contractors must keep a copy of the agreed method statement
either with them or held in the appropriate tool box at all times. Sub-contractors must
sign that they have received the method statement and adhere to the method
identified. Where changes in procedure are required these are to be agreed with the
relevant parties. This includes the method of work, use of materials or plant and
equipment.
Reports
Safety Management Group:
The Safety Group will report on performance to the Board once per year. Key topics
will include, progress on the safety plan, incident data and training.
Site Reports
Site reports, consisting of the job card, risk assessment and method statement and
any other relevant document should be held for all contracts.
Site Logs are to be completed / updated and copies held for quality purposes. A
Inspections
Work on-site
All work areas are to be inspected by the relevant supervisor and significant
comments recorded for records purposes. These should form part of the site report.
17
A company Tester / competent person will inspect the work undertaken, and make a
record of significant findings. These will be held in the contract site report.
As necessary a copy of relevant documentation should be made available for the
premises / owner.
Any defects are to be reported using the standard report form.
Any statutory reports and registers are to be completed in compliance with legislation
including as specified in the appropriate Schedule. A copy should be held in the site
report.
Incident Reporting
For working purposes an ‘incident’ is anything untoward that happens which wasn’t
supposed to happen and either did or could have resulted in harm to people or
damage to equipment. (‘Harm’ means any injury requiring first aid or more).
An ‘accident’ – should be understood as an incident which results in harm to
someone - a member of staff or public. All accidents should be recorded in the
accident book or accident report form.
Where they result in time lost from work –these are to be investigated by the Quality
and Safety Manager and where necessary reported in accordance with the Reporting
of Injuries Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations. (RIDDOR) (refer to
Arrangement for reporting accidents).
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Cooperation
The Company is fully aware of its obligation to cooperate with any agent who has
duties to perform by or under respective statutory requirements. To this end it will
fully cooperate with other organisations as appropriate. In particular the following
measure will be taken:
On-site:
1. The site supervisor / senior engineer will ensure that he cooperates as appropriate
with any persons having duties to perform by or under relevant provisions for Health
and Safety purposes e.g. Fire Safety.
2. It is important that any activities which may interfere with the work in hand are
identified and suitable arrangements agreed to ensure that risks are kept under
control e.g. out of hours work, permits to work etc. Such arrangements are to be
included as necessary in the appropriate method statement.
3. On projects covered by the CDM regulations, the site supervisor will ensure
cooperation as per local site rules.
Competence
All personnel
As per the requirements of BS EN 81-80:2003 and associated British Standard 7255:
2001, all persons who might at any time
o Be working on a lift or related equipment,
o Be working within a well, pit, machinery space or pulley room, or
o Be carrying out risk assessments,
will possess demonstrable competence in basic lift safety and procedures, or be
under relevant supervision.
All sub-contracted personnel must be able to demonstrate either a minimum level of
qualification (EMTA NVQ EOR / 202 or equivalent).
Lift craftspersons (fitters)
Lift craftspersons should have a minimum qualification of EMTA NVQ Level 3 or its
equivalent and meet the general requirements as specified in BS7255:2001 (as
amended)
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Lift inspectors and engineer surveyors
Will as a minimum stipulation, be competent in their practising trade. They will also
possess demonstrable competence in the safe operation of all lift equipment. As
necessary they will be required to seek appropriate ongoing safety training to
maintain and /or develop their skills.
Lift adjusters/testers (or persons carrying out such functions)
Lift adjusters/testers will have a minimum qualification of the following
o EMTA NVQ units at Level 4: UC401, Health and safety within industry;
EMTAUC402, Working with data and information; as well as one or both of
the following:
o UT403, Performing testing operations;
o UT405, Performing commissioning tests on plant and equipment.
They will be trained in safe working procedures and will have the experience, skill
and knowledge to undertake the commissioning of lifts following installation or
refurbishment.
Assessment
In the absence of formal qualification – a company Tester and / or Operations
Manager will approve individual competence in the above, or otherwise, on a case by
case basis.
Risk control systems
A risk control system is system for ensuring that the identified control measures are
in place for a job.
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Appendix 1. Hazard Report
To: c.c. Date
From:
I have reason to believe that the following condition below could cause injury, damage or have an
adverse effect on someone’s health
Issue of concern
Where is the hazard?
Building Floor Room/Area
Identify the hazard – tick the appropriate box(es) below:
Asbestos Burns / Scalds Chemicals Dust / Fumes Electrical
Fire Fall From Height Handling Lighting Machinery
Obstruction Proximity
Sharps (needles /
glass)
Struck by
something
Space
Tripping / Slipping Ventilation Vehicles Other:
Briefly describe the Hazard /Issue (continue on separate sheet if requ’d)
Indicate the level of risk associated with this hazard:
High  Medium  Low 
Manager’s Response: I have investigated the above circumstances. Risk control measures are
adequate/inadequate (delete as necessary). The following action will be implemented within
……. Day(s) / Week(s):
21
The Chiltern Lift Company Limited
Health & Safety Policy
Section Three
Arrangements
22
Section 3: Arrangements
Section 3 : Arrangements .......................................................................22
Fire Procedure:.......................................................................................23
First Aid Arrangements .............................................................................3
Accident reporting.....................................................................................4
Incident/ Accident reporting ......................................................................4
Risk Assessments;....................................................................................5
Reporting Hazards....................................................................................6
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) ......................................................7
Manual Handling.......................................................................................7
Training / Supervision: ..............................................................................7
Work at height...........................................................................................8
Asbestos...................................................................................................8
Sub-Contractors........................................................................................8
Welfare Facilities ......................................................................................9
Maintenance of Work Equipment..............................................................8
Electrical Work and Safe Isolation Procedures.......................................13
Consultation............................................................................................17
Chiltern Risk Assessment Form..............................................................19
Chiltern Hazard Report form. ..................................................................20
23
Introduction:
This section contains both an outline of the arrangements which have been made,
and where appropriate refers to the more detailed arrangements which are issued as
a discreet item, forming part of the safety manual for the company.
Fire Procedure:
These procedures relate to works being carried out at both customer sites and
at the Company main office. When at external customer sites it is the
employees responsibility to familiarize themselves with site fire and
emergency procedures.
If you discover a fire, operate the nearest alarm or, if no alarm is provided,
shout “FIRE”
If you hear the fire alarm, leave the building via the nearest available escape
route and go to the designated assembly area. Lifts must not be used in the
event of a fire.
Emergency services – in the event of a fire or other serious accident or
incident requiring the attendance of an emergency service:
 Dial 999 emergency services
 State precise location along with any details regarding the nature of
the emergency that the operator may request
 Await confirmation that your message has been understood
 If possible, arrange for someone to be at the main entrance of the
building to meet with the emergency services upon arrival.
IN THE EVENT OF FIRE
General
 Raise alarm
 Establish exact location of fire,
 What materials are involved,
 Size of fire,
 Risk to life by checking affected area if safely possible.
All Areas
If there is no risk, limit spread of fire by use of fire extinguishers.
Fire Action
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It is your duty to prevent fire, to know what action to take in the event of fire
and to ensure that you are familiar with means of escape from fire.
First Aid Arrangements
The sequence given is guidance for treating adult casualties. Basic first aid
facilities are to be found in the main Company offices and in each engineers
van.
1 ASSESS SITUATION
 Are there any risks to you
or the casualty?
2 CHECK CASUALTY
 Is the casualty conscious?
3 CHECK RESPONSE
 Do they respond to your
voice or gentle stimulation?
4 OPEN AIRWAY, CHECK BREATHING
 Open airway and check for breathing.
 Is casualty breathing normally?
Yes
 Put your safety first. If
possible remove the danger
or move away from danger.
 If unsafe, call for emergency
help and wait for it to arrive.
Yes
Yes
Yes
No
No
No
No
 ARE YOU ALONE Yes
No
 Check other conditions and
treat as necessary.
 Summon help if required.
 Check other conditions ( as
below), treat as necessary.
 Summon help if required.
 Place casualty in recovery
position.
 Summon help if required.
 Is the unconsciousness due to drowning?
Yes No
25
Accident reporting.
 The accident record book is to be found at the main Company offices.
 When reporting any accident or dangerous occurances be sure to
detail exactly where, when and how the incident occurred.
Incident/ Accident reporting
For working purposes an ‘incident’ is anything untoward that happens which wasn’t
supposed to happen and either did or could have resulted in harm to people or
damage to equipment. (‘Harm’ means any injury requiring first aid or more).
Any incident indicates that something wasn’t sufficiently controlled and acts as
important information – possibly preventing a more serious occurrence. It is important
that any significant incident is reported.
An ‘accident’ – should be understood as an incident which results in harm to
someone - a member of staff or public.
All accidents should be recorded in the accident book or accident report form.
Where an accident results in time lost from work –these are to be investigated by the
Quality and Safety Manager and where necessary reported in accordance with the
Reporting of Injuries Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations.
Cf: Reporting Accidents to HSE. (http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/online.htm)
Cf: Reporting Accidents to HSE. (http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/online.htm)
Reporting of Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences
Some accidents must be reported to the Health & Safety Executive.
In particular:
o Accidents which result in absence from work for more than three days
including non-working days but excluding the day on which the accident
occurred must be reported (on form F2508) within ten days of the accident or
online.
 Ask a helper to call an ambulance and to
pass on details of the casualty’s condition.
 MOVE TO STEP 5
 Give 5 rescue breathes and
carry out CPR for 1 minute
before calling ambulance.
 MOVE TO STEP 5
 Call ambulkance then
continue CPR sequence
 MOVE TO STEP 55 COMMENCE CPR SEQUENCE
 Give 30 chest compressions
 Give 2 rescue breathes
 Continue chest compressions followed by rescue breathes
until:
- Emergency helps over;
- The casualty starts to breathe normally;
- You are too exhausted to continue.
 WARNING: If at anytime the casualty starts to breathe
normally, place them in the recovery position.
26
o Accidents resulting in a serious injury or with someone being taken to hospital
or being injured through violence.
The Supervisor or Manager must obtain as much information immediately after the
accident. Wherever possible they must photograph or sketch the scene. Written
notes must be taken. All significant accidents will be investigated by the Company,
who will cooperate in any wider investigation by other agencies. In the case of fatal
accidents, specified major injury or dangerous occurrences, the enforcing authority
must be notified immediately by the quickest practical means
(normally by telephone - 0845 300 99 23).
A written report (on Form F2508) must also be made forthwith or within ten days of
the accident or reported online.(http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/online.htm)
Dangerous occurrences, which are also reportable, on form F2508A include collapse
of certain lifting equipment and scaffolding, accidental ignition of explosives or the
release of large quantities of highly inflammable liquids, even if no injury is caused.
o A record of reportable injuries must be entered into the Company or Contract
Accident Book and salient details noted. Such records will be kept for at least
three years
o The Quality and Safety Manager must be informed immediately of any major
incident whether it leads to injury / damage or not.
o The local EHO or the HSE may carry out its own investigation at the scene of
an accident.
o The Supervisor / Manager is responsible for gathering initial information on all
accidents which occur on the Company's premises. The contract supervisor
/ senior engineer is responsible on contract sites. Each is responsible for
liaising with the relevant departmental management and supervisory staff
during the investigation of an accident. It is essential to ensure that the
appropriate remedial action is taken by the person(s) responsible on a day to
day basis for the safety of the area concerned.
List of Emergency Telephone Numbers
Service Telephone number:
Gas emergency 01753 571570 Consider evacuation
Water 01628 528185 Isolate and ensure main
office informed
Electricity supply 01635 521333
Telephone 151
Risk Assessments;
1. Risk assessments are required for all work activities.
What When / Who
Office 8 Furlong Road
Q&S Manager to undertake all
office related assessments –
using simple form (cf Appendix 1
below)
Annually/ Q&S Manager.
Sites Domestic Sites &
Non-Domestic Sites
Detailed risk assessments are
included in the ‘Arrangements for
Lift co-ordinators to ensure
all assessments
completed and form part
of the site report.
27
general working on site’
document.
Records A copy of the significant findings
of all risk assessments is to be
made and held on record as part
of site reports
Safety Group to review
annually (or earlier as
required).
Generics Generic Risk Assessments may
be used as the basis of site
specific assessments.
The 74 point checklist should be
adapted accordingly – refer to
detailed arrangements
R/A form given below.
Method
Statements
Method statements are to be
developed from site specific risk
assessments
Coordinators / Engineers
as required.
Reporting Hazards
Item Action Standard
Reporting:
Hazard reports may be verbal or
written.
Verbally
In the first instance discuss with
supervisor / manager, and / or the
company Quality & Safety
Manager
In writing
Email or write to Quality and
Safety Manager or any manager /
director.
Use report form given
below
Any urgent issues must be
immediately drawn to the attention
of a supervisor, manager or
director of the company who will
address the issue as appropriate
This is a requirement on all
staff and sub-contractors.
Urgent issues include
anything that could cause
imminent harm.
(Refer to p8 section 2 of manual – organisation).
COSHH
Detailed arrangements for the assessment and control of substances which may be
hazardous to health are given in Chiltern Lift Co. COSHH arrangements guidance
note’.
28
Item Action Standard
Purchasing A copy of the Manufacturers
Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) must
be retained on any new
substances purchased.
Assessments Ensure that all substances which
might be hazardous to health are
assessed for risk and suitable
controls implemented.
The Quality and Safety
Manager
A copy of the significant findings is
to be held on file and where
appropriate on-site.
29
Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
Compliance PPE will be issued as
necessary subject to a risk
assessment.
Record of risk assessment
to be undertaken by Q&S
manager and retained on
file. .
For Onsite workers As a minimum all staff
working on site will be
issued with
Boots
Gloves
Hi-viz vest
Hard hat
Safety Glasses
Overalls.
These are to be worn
while on-site.
Failure to wear as required
is a disciplinary matter.
As necessary, harnesses,
masks etc will be
available.
A record is to be kept of
issues and maintenance
measures by the Quality
and Safety Manager.
For temporary workers.
Office workers PPE including glasses for
work at display screen
equipment will be issued
following an assessment
of requirement
Glasses will be issued
only on the advice of the
optician if required for
work at screens.
:
Manual Handling
1. The Quality and Safety Manager will review all work activities to identify and
assess any hazardous manual handling tasks.
2. No manual handling is to be undertaken which might result in injury to a member
of staff.
3. Any concerns in this area should be reported to the Quality and Safety Manager.
4. Manual handling assessments are as detailed in the Chiltern Manual Handling
guidance note.
Training / Supervision:
1. Detailed training arrangements are given in Chiltern Lifts Training guidance note.
2. The company will ensure that all staff are suitably trainee by identifying the
necessary requirements and developing and ongoing programme on a prioritised
basis.
3. The Quality and Safety manager will advise the Safety Group on training and
supervision issues.
30
Work at height
1. Detailed arrangements for working at height is given in Chiltern Lifts guidance
note on Working at Height.
2. The Health and Safety Executive report that on average 13 people a year die at
work falling from ladders and nearly 1200 suffer major injuries. More than a
quarter of falls happen from ladders.
3. HSE’s key message is that ladders should only be used for low-risk, short-
duration work. All work at height must be assessed and ladder only used in low
risk, short duration (max 15mins) work.
Asbestos
1. No work is to be undertaken on asbestos.
2. Do not interfere with asbestos or an asbestos containing material
3. Prior to any work commencing – ensure that the asbestos register for the
premises is checked.
4. If you suspect a material may contain asbestos ensure that you do not disturb it.
If you have reason to believe that asbestos fibres may have been released, stop
work. Isolate the area and report your concerns immediately to the on-site
representative / manager and the main Office.
5. Asbestos is considered as part of the wider ‘Authorisation to Commence Work’
arrangements.
Further information on asbestos is available from:
http://www.hse.gov.uk/asbestos/index.htm
Sub-Contractors
1. Sub-contracted labour will be used as necessary to ensure service commitments
are maintained.
2. It is essential that any sub-contracted labour also maintains the necessary safety
standards.
3. The Company will take the appropriate steps as detailed in ‘Arrangements for
sub-contracted labour’ guidance to ensure that potential sub-contractors are
vetted and assessed.
4. The outcome will be that the company will develop its own ‘approved list’ of tried
and tested labour, suitably qualified and alert to the appropriate company
standards.
Welfare Provision
Office Welfare Facilities
The following welfare facilities are provided at Chiltern Lift Company Head Office and
are available to all staff:
31
 2 Separate toilets (gender designated) with flushing toilet and hand wash basin.
 Dining area for eating.
 Kitchen area for food and drinks preparation including microwave, refrigerator
with freezer box compartment, kettle, fresh drinking water supply and washing
up facilities.
 1st
floor landing toilet area to be used for the changing of clothes as and when
required.
Welfare Facilities for Off-Site Mobile Workers
For staff that are predominantly based off-site (e.g. engineers, testers etc) the following
welfare provision arrangements will be made;
Project Manager or Service Manager to ensure suitable welfare facilities are provided
from the start and maintained throughout the planned works.
The availability of welfare facilities, their location on site and regular maintenance will
be considered at the planning and preparation stages of every works project, before
work starts.
In such cases, it may be appropriate to make arrangements to use facilities provided by
the owner of existing premises, in which the work is being done, local public facilities or
the facilities of local businesses. Clear agreement will be made with the provider of the
facilities.
Facilities will be made readily accessible to the worksite, open at all relevant times, be
at no cost to the workers, be of an acceptable standard in terms of cleanliness and
have handwashing facilities. Workers will be made aware of the arrangements to use
them and be informed of their location prior to the start of works.
Planning for Provision of Temporary Welfare Provision Units
Planning welfare provision, the following is to be considered:
 the nature of the work to be carried out and the health risks associated with it.
For example, consider the provision of showers if the project involves hazardous
substances or very dirty work, eg dusty removal activities, work on construction
sites, etc;
 the distance workers will have to travel to the welfare facilities;
 the duration of the work and number of different locations;
 the numbers of people who will use them;
 the cleaning and maintenance of the welfare facilities;
Should the additional provision of welfare facilities be required (i.e. installation of
portable toilets etc. when working as Principle Contractor) the adequate facilities will be
put in place prior to start of works.
Positioning on site
Site welfare units will be positioned to manage traffic effectively and ensure adequate
segregation of pedestrians and vehicles.
Toilets
32
Flushing toilets and running water, connected to mains water and drainage systems will
be provided. If this is not possible, facilities with a built-in water supply and drainage
tanks will be used. Portable chemical toilets are acceptable only if it is not reasonably
practicable to make other adequate provision.
Toilets will be adequately ventilated, lit and maintained in a clean condition.
The adequate number of toilets will be considered and provided. The number needed
will depend on the number of workers on site and the type of facilities provided.
BS6465–1:2006 recommends a ratio of 1 toilet to 7 persons where portable toilets are
emptied once a week.
Men and women may use the same toilet, if it is in a lockable room and partitioned from
any urinals.
Otherwise provide separate toilets. Adequate supplies of toilet paper will always be
available.
Sanitary waste disposal will be provided in facilities used by female workers.
Washing facilities
Washing facilities next to both toilets and changing areas to be provided and include:
 a supply of clean hot and cold, or warm, water (which should be running water
so far as is reasonably practicable);
 soap or other suitable means of cleaning;
 towels or other suitable means of drying;
 sufficient ventilation and lighting;
 sinks large enough to wash face, hands and forearms.
Showers used for particularly dirty work, or when workers are exposed to especially
hazardous substances (eg development of contaminated land, or demolition of old
industrial buildings which are contaminated with toxic substances etc), will be provided
where appropriate and be separate from the main facilities.
Drinking water
A supply of wholesome drinking water will be readily available. Where possible, it will
be supplied direct from the mains. If water is stored, it will be protected from possible
contamination and make sure it is changed often enough to prevent it from becoming
stale or contaminated. The drinking water supply will be marked to prevent it being
confused with hazardous liquids or water which is not fit to drink. Cups or other drinking
vessels will be provided at the outlet.
Changing rooms and lockers
As an when required the work site will have arrangements for securely storing personal
clothing not worn on site and for protective clothing needed for site work. Separate
lockers will be provided, although on smaller sites the site office may be a suitable
storage area provided it is kept secure. Where there is a risk of protective site clothing
contaminating everyday clothing, items will be stored separately. Provision will be made
to allow wet clothing to be dried. As a general rule clothing will not be placed directly on
heaters due to the risk of fire. If electrical heaters are used, they will be properly
ventilated and, if possible, fitted with a high temperature cut-out device.
Rest facilities
Rest facilities will be provided as and when required. The rest facilities will have
adequate numbers of tables, seating with backs, a means for heating water for drinks
33
and for warming up food (eg a gas or electrical heating ring or microwave oven) and be
adequately heated. Rest areas are not to be used to store plant, equipment or
materials.
Rest facilities will be heated using properly maintained electrical equipment.
MAINTENANCE OF PLANT AND EQUIPMENT
Chiltern Lifts will ensure that work equipment is maintained in an efficient state, in
working order and in good repair. Where the equipment has a maintenance log this log
is to be kept up to date.
The Company has a statutory duty to maintain its plant and equipment and avoid risks
to health and safety.
The Company will use maintenance schedules to control and manage the equipment.
Various maintenance programmes may be required these will need to take into account
the operational needs as well as health and safety considerations and the possible
impact on the environment. Also allowances must be made for the aptitude and skill of
the operator.
Chiltern Lifts may use:
 Unscheduled or breakdown maintenance
 Scheduled or routine maintenance
 Planned preventive maintenance
 Predictive maintenance
 Improvement maintenance.
The Company will provide adequate supervision that provides information and training
to ensure that there is compliance with safety procedures.
The Company will develop safe systems of work, which identify risks hazards and then
eliminate or control the risks to a minimum.
Operatives using Company Plant and Equipment will be competent and trained. They
must inspect the equipment before use and must not misuse the equipment. Operatives
must report all faults, damage, defects or malfunctions to their Supervisor / foreman.
They must not use defective equipment. Defective equipment must be immobilised and
identified as awaiting repair.
PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE
Where practicable a programme of routine preventative maintenance shall operate. The
programme should be documented in adequate detail, and records kept of work carried
out under the programme. Unscheduled downtime and “non-casualty” repair costs
should be used to identify preventive maintenance needs.
POWER TOOLS
The following regulations apply to the use of electrical power tools on site or other
workplaces.
 The Electricity at Work Regulations 1989.
 The Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992.
34
Guidance on the safe use of electricity on construction sites is found in the following
publications.
 The I.E.E. Regulations for the electrical equipment of Buildings, Section H.
 The British Standard 4363 1991 - Distribution units for electricity supplies for
construction and building sites.
 British Standard 4363, 1991 - Industrial plugs, sockets, outlets etc.
Various other British Standards apply to the type of cabling and power tools.
The following Health and Safety Executive Guidance Notes will be complied with where
applicable;
Copies of the relevant regulations will be kept at Head Office for reference.
The site supervisor will ensure that all portable electrical tools and equipment is
maintained and tested as per the required periods.
Only authorised persons shall be permitted to repair or alter electrical equipment. Any
defects noted in electrical equipment must be reported to supervisor so that immediate
steps can be taken to have defects remedied by an approved contractor or to have
equipment to be replaced.
PAT TESTING
All electric appliances such as hand drills, hand saws, angle grinders etc are to be
tested in accordance with Regulation 16 of the Electricity at Work Regulations. These
tests apply to all electrical appliances used by the company and will be carried out
annually.
Users of equipment are to be aware of the need to only use equipment that is safe so
far as they are aware. Carry out informal visual inspections for obvious faults at all
times and report faults that are found to their supervisor immediately.
Formal visual inspections are to be carried out by a competent person annually and the
results recorded.
Combined inspection and testing to be carried out by a competent person at
appropriate intervals and the results recorded.
Instrument testing
Class 1: Equipment that relies on a connection to the earthing system of the fixed
wiring installation. The cord or flex will have an earth wire (coloured green and yellow)
as well as a phase (coloured brown) and a neutral (coloured blue). Class 1 equipment
requires Earth Bond Continuity and Insulation Resistance tests to be carried out.
Class 2: Equipment has an extra layer of insulation to protect the user from electric
shock, does not require a connection with the earthing system so will not have an earth
wire (coloured yellow and green). Class 2 equipment requires Insulation Resistance test
only.
Class 3: Equipment that uses low voltage (less than 50V) supplied from a specialised
transformer. The transformer itself and the lead connecting it to the fixed wiring supply
may be either class 1 or class 2.
NOTE THAT THE CODE OF PRACTICE IS FOR ALL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT
NOT JUST PORTABLE EQUIPMENT OR 'ANYTHING WITH A PLUG.'
35
Electrical Work and Safe Isolation Procedures
It is essential from the outset that effective management and control of the electrical
system, apparatus and equipment used on site is achieved and maintained, thereby
ensuring that the hazards and risks which can arise are minimised.
An authorised person (site supervisor) will be appointed, with responsibility for the
supervision of the installation of switchgear, equipment, cables, jointing, etc. throughout
any work project. The site supervisor will have responsibility for the safe working
practices of the operatives, as well the control of appointed sub-contractors; sub-
contractors must provide appropriate method statements and risk assessments for their
works prior to start of works.
Once machine-rooms and work areas are made available by the main contractor for
works to proceed, and before installation of any equipment commences, it should be
ensured that a suitable door is fitted to the machine-room and that heavy duty locks, or
padlocks, and keys are provided.
Also ensure that access doors are locked when not working in these areas. Plant and
materials should not be stored in the machine-rooms.
Always try to avoid energising any outgoing electrical distribution services until the
distribution switchgear and all connected circuits are complete and have been
inspected and tested. Once distribution services are energised, where necessary
implement the safe isolation procedures explained in the rest of these procedures.
Before energising any final circuit (i.e. lighting, power, etc.) it should be checked that
the wiring system within the area has been completed and equipment, including
luminaries and accessories, fitted. This check should ensure that earthing
arrangements and protective conductors including equipotential bonding are in place,
and that the final circuit is tested as far as possible.
If the service in question is energised for the testing and commissioning of
equipment/system, it must be switched OFF and locked upon completion of this work,
unless stated otherwise on the written job instruction and agreed with the site
supervisor.
When live services are provided prior to final commissioning, warning signs should be
displayed on each item of live switchgear, plant and along cable routes that pass
through the work areas in exposed positions. This is particularly important where
switchgear and cables are exposed to damage that may be caused by other trades or
the environmental conditions.
For work on LV electrical equipment or circuits, it is important to ensure that the correct
point of isolation is identified, an appropriate means of isolation is used and the supply
cannot inadvertently be reinstated while the work is in progress. Caution notices should
also be applied at the point(s) of isolation, and the conductors must be proved to be
dead at the point of work before they are touched.
A fundamental principle is that the point of isolation should be under the control of the
person who is
carrying out the work on the isolated conductors.
The means of isolation can be an adjacent local isolation device such as a plug and
socket, switch-disconnector, circuit breaker, fuse etc, as appropriate, which is under the
direct control of the competent person carrying out the work. These devices can be
used without further precautions provided there is no foreseeable risk that the supply
could be reinstated by others.
36
When there is no such local means of isolation or there is a risk of reinstatement of the
supply as above, the circuit or equipment to be worked on should be securely isolated
by one of the following methods;
 Isolation using a main switch or distribution board (DB) switch-disconnector
 Isolation of equipment or circuits using the main switch or DB switch-
disconnector is the preferred method. The point of isolation should be locked off
using a unique key or combination retained by the person carrying out the work.
In the case of multiple isolations on a DB, a multi-lock hasp can be used to
prevent access to a main isolator until such time that all persons working on a
system have completed their work and removed their padlocks from the hasp.
 If locking-off facilities are not provided on the relevant switch then a locked DB
door or locked switch-room door is acceptable provided the key or combination
is unique, and is retained by the person doing the work. Again, multi-lock hasps
can be used to control multiple isolations, although a key box or similar system
may be needed to retain and control access to the main door key.
Where it is intended that more than one person will be working on circuits supplied from
a DB, (i.e. multiple isolations) and a multi-lock hasp cannot be used to secure the main
point of isolation, individual isolation of each circuit by one or more of the methods
shown below is recommended, to prevent inadvertent reinstatement of the supply. The
principle is that each person carrying out such work should have control of their own
point(s) of isolation and not rely on others to prevent inadvertent energisation.
Isolation of individual circuits
Where it is not practical to isolate a distribution board, individual circuits supplied from it
can be isolated by one of the methods described below, depending on the type of
protective device used. However, bear in mind the overriding advice to avoid
energising any outgoing electrical distribution services, preferably until the distribution
switchgear and all connected circuits are complete and have been inspected and the
relevant tests carried out.
If any items required to carry out the procedures recommended below are not
manufactured for the DB in question or cannot be obtained through retail/trade outlets,
it is acceptable to disconnect the circuit from the DB as long as the disconnected tails
are made safe by being coiled or insulated. Suitable labelling of the disconnected
conductors is important to prevent the supply being re-instated, particularly if other
electricians are present.
It should be remembered that work carried out inside a live DB is regarded as live
working when there is access to exposed live conductors. In this case the appropriate
precautions should be taken as described in HSG85 with respect to Regulation 14 of
the Electricity at Work Regulations.
i. Isolation of individual circuits protected by circuit breakers Where circuit
breakers are used the relevant device should be locked-off using an
appropriate locking-off clip with a padlock which can only be opened by a
unique key or combination. The key or combination should be retained by the
person carrying out the work.
Note: Some DBs are manufactured with ‘Slider Switches’ to disconnect the
circuit from the live side of the circuit breaker. These devices should not be
relied upon as the only means of isolation for circuits as the wrong switch
could easily be operated on completion of the work.
ii. Isolation of individual circuits protected by fuses
37
Where fuses are used, the simple removal of the fuse is an acceptable
means of disconnection. Where removal of the fuse exposes live terminals
that can be touched, the incoming supply to the fuse will need to be isolated.
To prevent the fuse being replaced by others, the fuse should be retained by
the person carrying out the work, and a lockable fuse insert with a padlock
should be fitted as above. A caution notice should also be used to deter
inadvertent replacement of a spare fuse. In addition, it is recommended that
the enclosure is locked to prevent access as stated above under ‘Isolation
using a main switch or distribution board (DB) switch-disconnector’.
Note: In TT systems, the incoming neutral conductor cannot reliably be
regarded as being at earth potential. This means that for TT supplies, a multi-
pole switching device which disconnects the phase and neutral conductors
must be used as the means of isolation. For similar reasons, in IT systems all
poles of the supply must be disconnected. Single pole isolation in these
circumstances is not acceptable.
Caution Notices
Following isolation of equipment or circuits and before starting work it should be proved
that the parts
to be worked on and those nearby, are dead. It should never be assumed that
equipment is dead because a particular isolation device has been placed in the off
position.
The procedure for proving dead should be by use of a proprietary test lamp or two pole
voltage detector as recommended in HSE Guidance Note GS38, Electrical test
equipment for use by electricians. Non-contact voltage indicators (voltage sticks) and
multi-meters should not be used. The test instrument should be proved to be working
on a known live source or proprietary proving unit before and after use. All phases of
the supply and the neutral should be tested and proved dead.
New installations
New installations can be a particular hazard as some of the circuits or equipment may
require to be modified after the installation has been energised. It is therefore important
that every protective device is correctly identified at each distribution board before any
energising takes place, and safe isolation procedures, such as locking-off circuit
breakers as described above, are adopted, particularly where a number of electricians
are working on the same installation.
The practice of placing PVC insulating tape over a circuit breaker to prevent inadvertent
switch-on is
not a safe means of isolation.
Neutral conductors
Care should be taken when working on neutral conductors of circuits. The practice of
‘borrowing’ neutrals, i.e. making use of the neutral of one circuit for use on another
circuit, is not permitted by BS 7671.
This dangerous practice, however, is not uncommon. Lighting and control circuits are
the most common examples where this practice is found. In these circumstances the
neutral conductor can become live when the conductor is disconnected, if a load is
connected to that circuit.
It is also difficult to identify specific neutral conductors in ‘bunches’ of single core
cables, e.g. where enclosed in trunking or conduit, and care should be taken when
severing such cables that the correct
38
conductor has been identified. If doubt exists, live working measures, such as the use
of eye protection, electricians insulating gloves, insulated tools etc, should be employed
until the circuit has been proved dead.
Proving dead unused or unidentified cables Where there is uncertainty regarding
isolation when removing unidentified cables or proving dead an ‘unused’ cable,
particularly where insufficient conductor is exposed to enable the use of test probes,
those conductors should be assumed to be live until positively proven to be dead and
any work carried out on them should employ live working practices until the conductors
are proved dead.
Clamp meters can be used as a means of identifying cables by testing for current flow
in the conductors.
Non-contact voltage indicators (voltage sticks) can also be useful in these situations to
test for voltage where cables without a metallic sheath are to be identified. However,
once insulation is pared using live working practices to reveal the underlying
conductors, contact voltage detectors should be used as the means of proving dead.
Additional Precautions
Manager and supervisors must ensure that all employees involved in work on electrical
equipment are competent and are instructed on safe systems of work, have been
issued with written rules and instructions, and have access to, and use, appropriate
locking-off devices, caution notices, a proprietary voltage detector and, where
appropriate for the type of voltage detector being used, a proving unit.
Consultation
As a small company consultation is largely conducted on an informal basis and we
value this important aspect of communication.
Where there is likely to be a significant change in working practices affecting the Health
& Safety of staff, the Safety Group will consult more formally as appropriate. This may
be by emailing or by asking for input from staff, or an invitation to attend at the Safety
Management Group meeting (held every 12 weeks)
The Safety Management Group meeting will be the forum covering:
 New systems of work
 New technology
 Appointment of external contractors
 Environmental issues
 Risk control systems
 Compliance issues
 Health & Safety training
 Purchasing
and any other topic affecting health safety or the environment.
Suggestions from staff on Health, Safety and Environmental matters are valued and
may be made formally or informally to any manager or director. The hazard report form
may be used (below).
Staff are encouraged to report any H&S concerns they have. If there is a specific issue
which a member of staff believes should be addressed it should be raised in the first
instance with their supervisor / manager, and / or discussed with the company Quality &
Safety Manager.
39
Statutory Notices
In accordance with the provisions of the Health & Safety (Consultation with Employees)
Regulations 1996, a poster informing employees in general terms about the
requirements of Health & Safety law is displayed in the main company office on the
notice display board.
This information will be issued in leaflet form for employees who work away from the
premises. Employees are required read the information contained in the poster or
leaflet carefully, as it describes the key points of the duties of the employer and
employee respectively under the laws relating to Health & Safety.
Employees will be expected to sign a register accepting that this information has been
made readily available and if necessary explained to them.
Information is also provided on the local addresses of the enforcing authority for Health
& Safety law.
The Local Authority Environmental Health Department is to be found at:
Environmental Health Department
Buckinghamshire County Council
Civic Centre
Walton Street Tel: 01296 395000
Aylesbury HP20 1UX www.buckscc.gov.uk
The Employment Medical Advisory Service (EMAS) can be contacted at:
European Medical Advisory Service (EMAS)
109 Bancroft Tel:
Hitchin www.emas-medical.com
Herts SG5 1NB
40
Chiltern Hazard Report form.
To: c.c. Date
From:
I have reason to believe that the following condition below could cause injury, damage or have an
adverse effect on someone’s health
Where is the hazard?
What is the issue of concern?
Building Floor Room/Area
Identify the hazard – tick the appropriate box(es) below:
Asbestos Burns / Scalds Chemicals Dust / Fumes Electrical
Fire Fall From Height Handling Lighting Machinery
Obstruction Proximity
Sharps (needles /
glass)
Struck by
something
Space
Tripping / Slipping Ventilation Vehicles Other:
Briefly describe the Hazard / Issue – continue on separate sheet if required.
Indicate the level of risk associated with this hazard:
High  Medium  Low 
Manager’s Response: I have investigated the above circumstances. Risk control measures are
adequate/inadequate (delete as necessary). The following action will be implemented within
……. Day(s) / Week(s):
41
Arrangements for general work on site.
General Procedure:
Depending on nature of the contract preliminary information about the job may already have been made
available e.g. access to site, or the method statement may have been developed from a previous
scoping visit for assessment purposes.
It it important to ensure clear communications with the site / project prior to work commencing and not
undertake any work until all are agreed on a safe working method. In general the following procedure
should be carefully gone through.
Action Standard Who
1 Check owners responsibilities See list below
2
Complete lift risk assessment
and amend as appropriate
See Lift risk
assessment below
3 Check H&S file where it exists
4 Confirm no asbestos.
Use the ‘Authorisation
To Commence Work’
form - below
5 Confirm electrical safety As above
6
Confirm safe working
arrangement – permits as
required
As above
7
Agree safe system with client /
representive
As above
8
Complete ‘Authorisation to
Commence Work’ form.
As above
9 Commence work
10
Finish work – Report to site
manager and update
11 Update log & site report
12 Leave site.
.
42
Owner Responsibilties.
The company should ensure that in all instances the Owners or site Responsible Person(s) are clear on
their duties as outlined in:
BS7255:2001 section 4 1 and adequately discharge these responsibilities.
As a minimum this should cover:
o Responsibilities for work on site
o Liaison / communications
o Personal Protective Equipment
o Access to electrical supplies
o The display of Safety Signs
o Housekeeping arrangements
o Access to safety file
o Effects on premises occupants
o Access to tools, equipment and materials.
o Permit to Work system
o Installation, major repair and dismantling safety.
o Access / Egress issues –including pit access, landings and machinery spaces and the integral
safe condition of each of these areas.
o Lighting
o Safe workplaces (i.e. the premises or part of premises where work is carried out).
o Access to machinery spaces
o Risk assessment of the works
o Lone Working arrangements
o Safe system for working in the well
o Ensure car top signs as applicable.
o Means for safe release of trapped passengers.
1
). Safety management: Responsibilities of owners,
43
Responsibility for work on site
Control:
The Engineer or other suitably qualified person will be responsible for all work on the site relating to the
lift installation, and should be fully aware of his duties.
The Engineer in charge must ascertain who is acting on behalf of the Owner in order that they can
report the start, progress and completion of the work.
Competence:
Any work carried out on lifts will be performed only by authorized persons, supervised and instructed on
the work and on how it is to be carried out safely.
In general a written safe systems of work which might already be included in prior contract information
will be followed.
Risk assessments will be completed to ensure the safety of other persons who could be at risk even if
they are not involved in the actual work being undertaken on a lift, e.g. persons intending to travel in the
lift.
Communication:
The engineer or other persons authorized to carry out work on a lift installation must advise the owner of
risks that could arise as a result of the work and agree with them a safe system of working.
Liaison
Before starting work or taking a lift out of service, the engineer will advise the owner's site
representative of the intention to do so by completing the Authorisation to Commence work form.
(below).
Risk assessment
If not already done prior to work commencing onsite, the engineer must undertake a risk assessment
together with the owner, to establish safety measures to ensure the safety of persons engaged in
undertaking the work and persons using the lifts. (see forms in Appendix 1 and 2).
44
The Engineer is to agree any special precautions or procedures need to be taken in regard to:
 Emergencies (first aid / fire / other foreseeable )
 Personal protective equipment
Personal protective equipment is to be provided as identified by risk assessment. Head protection,
gloves, eye protection, hearing protection, respirators, face-masks, safety harnesses etc. should be
provided, and used as required. Such equipment should be maintained in a serviceable condition and
replaced as necessary.
 Electrical equipment
The lift contractor is to use only the electrical supplies provided by the owner.
Work must not be carried out on or near to live electrical equipment, unless working in this way is
unavoidable. In such instances, work should be carried out only by an authorized person, implementing
a safe system of work that has been established by a risk assessment.2
NB. The integrity of the electrical supply is solely the responsibility of the owner.
 Arrangements for removal of lift from service must be agreed with the site representative /
manager.
 Housekeeping
Personnel must ensure high standards of housekeeping at all times in particular:
a) the avoidance of build-up of waste materials in wells;
b) the control and safe disposal of waste and other items and substances that are potentially injurious to
health and safety.
 Safety file
Prior to any significant works (other than very minor works) the on-site safety file is to be consulted. A
Safety file is required under the CDM regulations, following the initial installation of a lift. It must be
made available to the owner. The file should indicate:
a) the major aspects of the installation process;
b) servicing and maintenance requirements;
c) any special operations where a particular method needs to be adopted;
d) specific instructions for the dismantling and disposal of the lift at the end of its working life.
(NB: The technical dossier described in BS EN 81-1 and BS EN 81-2 could be used to form the basis of
the safety file.)
2
On multiple installations an electrical hazard can exist. Although an individual lift may be electrically isolated, it is
possible for electrical power to be supplied from a common/shared control panel.
45
 Effects on the occupants
Potential disruption, arising from the lift works, to the occupants of the premises should be assessed
and minimized.
 Access to tools, equipment and materials
Arrangements should be made between the lift contractor and the owner for:
a) safe access to all tools, equipment and materials at workplaces;
b) the provision of suitable and clearly identified storage space for tools, equipment, materials
and any portable access equipment;
c) the provision of alternative access routes as may become necessary during the works being
undertaken.
 Permits to work
Where appropriate, the engineer should obtain a permit to work from the owner.
Installation, major repair and dismantling
Where installation, major repair or dismantling is taking place, the procedures given in Annex E of
BS7255:2001 are to be implemented in addition to standard safe working procedures.
 Lone working
A permit to work system is to implemented for lone working. This includes remote machinery spaces,
pulley rooms or pits.
It is essential that when an authorized person is working alone the following procedures and provisions
are adopted:
a) before commencing work, the authorized person should register their presence with the owner's site
representative.
b) suitable arrangements should be made to ensure that the continued well-being of the authorized
person is confirmed periodically at intervals as identified by risk assessment;
c) any persons checking the well-being of authorized persons working alone should have knowledge of
how to organize assistance in the event of an emergency;
46
d) the specific arrangements and frequency for confirming the well-being of the authorized person
should be described in the relevant safe working procedure;
e) the authorized person working alone should inform a responsible person off-site of their proposed
movements during this period.
NOTE: These procedures are particularly important if an authorized person is working alone in
unoccupied premises.
 Working within the well
All persons working within a well should abide by all relevant safety signs.
Where required, barriers should be erected in front of the landing doors3. Landing doors should not be
allowed to remain open any longer than is necessary.
Prior to any landing door being opened, it must be decided whether the work to be carried out requires
the electrical power supply to be maintained. If not, the main switch should be locked in the "off'
position. Should the electrical supply need to be maintained, the normal lift control circuit should be
isolated.
Safe means of egress should be clearly established before entering the well. The safe means of egress
should exist during all phases of a work activity and should be readily accessible from the workplace.
Unauthorized persons should be prevented from entering the machinery space whilst persons are
working within the well.
The number of persons working within a well at the same time should be kept to a minimum. If possible,
the simultaneous employment of different tradespersons working independently of each other should be
avoided.
A permit to work system should be put in place where simultaneous employment of different trades is
unavoidable. A safe system of work should be put in place, and a risk assessment should be carried
out, to identify whether a permit to work system is necessary.
3 The barriers should have been provided by the owner.
47
A lift should not be returned to normal operation after completion of work, until it has been ascertained
that no persons, tools, temporary access equipment, etc., remain within the well. Any equipment, e.g. a
propping device, should be replaced in its proper storage position.
 Working on the car top
The risk assessment should indicate if be work is being undertaken from the car top and how the risks
will be minimised.
Where full (car) control is not provided and the car top is to be used and moved as a work platform, the
safe system of work must be agreed between the lift contractor and the owner.
The recommendations contained within the Safety Assessment Federation Limited (SAFed) document,
Recommendations - Safe working on lifts - Car top controls, should be implemented.
Working on a car top can be extremely dangerous and in recent years a number of industry fatalities
have resulted from inadequate provisions. It is extremely hazardous when working without full control
being available to the person riding on the car.
Whenever the car is stationary the stopping device should be operated.
NB Persons working on the top of a car are at particular risk when they are unprepared for the lift to be
set in motion. Examples of accidents associated with moving cars have been due either to falling or to
bodily contact with the well structure and/or equipment.
The correct operation of the car top control station functions should be verified before the car top is
accessed or any work activity commenced.
The number of persons travelling on the top of a car at anyone time should be kept to a minimum. One
person only should be in sole control of the starting and stopping of the car.
NOTE: The procedures adopted for moving the car are of prime importance, and it is essential that all
persons working on a car top are aware of when and how the car is to be moved.
Where there is a risk of a person working on a car top becoming trapped and where no means are
provided for escape via either the car or the well, an alarm or voice communication system is to be
used.
48
Where the safety sign indicates a possibility of free fall a safety harness must be worn. Suitable training,
information and instructions should be given and extreme care should be exercised in its use when
movement of the lift is necessary.
 Working in the pit
Lifts should always be moved at inspection speed whilst persons are in the pit.
A person entering a pit should first confirm the effectiveness of any stopping device installed. If there is
no stopping device installed, the main power supply should be isolated and locked off. (A permit system
must ensure the power cannot be restored except by authorised persons)
NOTE Keeping the car and/or landing doors open in order to interrupt the normal control circuit is not on
its own an adequate means of preventing car movement because landing doors can be self-closing. On
older installations the stopping device can be of the toggle type and subject to unintentional operation.
When work is being carried out in the pit, a device should be fitted in place from within the well, if
necessary, to restrain a sliding landing door. This device should retain the door within 75 mm of its
closed position so that the door cannot easily be pulled open from the landing side.
Such devices provide additional security for persons working within the pit and prevent persons outside
the well from opening the landing doors.
Where a counterweight screen has not been provided or has been removed, a safe system of work
should be implemented. If delegated to do so by the owner, the lift contractor should display a safety
sign in a prominent position.
If a mechanical restraint is provided, it should be correctly positioned before access is gained to the
space beneath the car. If the car is to be moved whilst authorized persons are in the well, the restraint
should be retained in its operative position.
The owner should provide a mechanical restraint for electric lifts where the space below the car is
restricted, and for all hydraulic lifts.
 Landing entrances
The unlocking and opening of a landing door or gate, when the car is not positioned at a landing, should
be undertaken only when necessary and then only by an authorized person.
49
Any unlocking device should be kept in a safe and secure place. If an unlocking device is not provided,
a safe system of work must take this into account.
On completion of the work, it should be verified that the landing door is closed and locked.
A landing door or gate should not be allowed to remain open any longer than is necessary. If a landing
door is to be left unlocked and open for any length of time, a barrier should be erected to protect the
open landing entrance.
 Machinery spaces and pulley rooms
All persons working within a machinery space or pulley room should abide by all relevant safety signs.
Other than when work activities are being carried out within a machinery space/pulley room, the
entrance door(s) to the room(s) should be kept locked to prevent unauthorized access.
On multiple installations, a thorough check should be made before commencing work to establish the
correct relationship between a specific lift and its corresponding well and associated equipment.
To facilitate this check, the owner should take steps to ensure that each lift and component part thereof
is clearly and uniquely identified, both at or adjacent to the lowest and highest landing entrances, and
within the machinery space
A risk assessment should be undertaken to establish safe working procedures where machinery is in
motion or capable of motion.
All permanently installed lifting equipment provided in machinery spaces or pulley rooms should be
used only within its safe working load.
 Safe release of trapped passengers
NOTE: Safe release procedures differ for different types of lift passenger release, e.g. traction lifts,
drum/chain lifts, hydraulic lifts, geared or gearless lifts. The general procedures given in are applicable
for all types of lift.
General
Only trained and authorized persons should undertake the safe release of trapped passengers.
NOTE: It is important that the release of passengers is carried out only by authorized persons who have
received the necessary training, because it is dangerous for any other persons to attempt to do so. A
50
failure to take adequate precautions may render the authorized person concerned guilty of negligence
should an accident occur.
If contracted to do so, the lift contractor should send to the site the requisite number of trained persons
to carry out the safe release of trapped passengers.
All release operations to be adopted should be carried out according to the manufacturer's or other
authorized instructions for the lift concerned, as permanently displayed in the form of a notice in the
machinery space.
An appropriate means should be implemented by which all persons effecting the release of trapped
passengers are able to communicate with one another.
To assist the safe release of passengers trapped in a car, an authorized person should be stationed at
the nearest available landing entrance. This person should be in direct communication with those in the
machinery space and the passengers in the car, and should continually reassure the passengers and
ensure that passengers do not attempt to leave the car prematurely.
It is imperative that trapped passengers should be warned of the intention to move the car and that they
should not attempt to leave it until they are advised that it is safe to do so.
Before commencing the safe release procedures, it is vital that the electrical supply should be isolated;
if lock -off facilities exist, they should be used.
Specific safety procedures for Electric traction lifts and Hydraulic lifts must be followed as appropriate.
51
DRAFT Lift Risk Assessment Form
52
Risk assessment for work on lifts: (Refer to BS EN 81-80:2003 (Safety rules for the construction and installation of lifts. Existing lifts. Rules for the improvement of safety of
existing passenger and goods passenger lifts))
Nr. HazardlHazardous situation
Hazard
HML
EN:81-80
Suitably
Controlled
Additional measured required
Residual Risk
Rating HML
1 Presence of harmful materials H 5.1.4
2 No or limited accessibility for disabled persons L 5.2.1
3 Drive system with bad stopping levelling accuracy H 5.2.2
4 No or inadequate vandal resistance M 5.3
5 No or inadequate control functions in case of fire H 5.4
6 Well enclosures with perforate walls H 5.5.1.1
7 Partially enclosed well with too low enclosure H 5.5.1.2
8 Inadequate locking devices on access doors to well and pit H 5.5.2
9 Inadequate vertical surface below landing door sills H 5.5.3
10 Counterweight/balancing weight without safety gear in case of L 5.5.4
accessible spaces below well
11 No or inadequate partition of counterweight/ balancing weight L 5.5.5
travel path
12 No or inadequate pit screen for several lifts in the same well H 5.5.6.1
13 No or inadequate partition for several lifts in the same well H 5.5.6.2
14 Insufficient safety spaces in headroom and pit H 5.5.7
15 Unsafe pit access H 5.5.8
16 No or inadequate stopping devices in the pit or in the pulley room H 5.5.9
17 No or inadequate lighting of the well H 5.5.10
53
Nr. HazardlHazardous situation
Hazard
HML
EN:81-80
Suitably
Controlled
Additional measured required
Residual Risk
Rating HML
18 No alarm system in pit and on car roof M 5.5.11
19 No or unsafe means of access to machine and pulley room H 5.6.1
20 Slippery floor in machine or pulley room L 5.6.2
21 Insufficient clearances in machine room M 5.6.3
22 No or inadequate protection on different levels in machine pulley H 5.6.4
room H
23 Inadequate lighting in machine or pulley room H 5.6.5
24 Inadequate means of handling equipment M 5.6.6
25 Perforate landing doors and car doors H 5.7.1
26 Inadequate design of landing door fixings H 5.7.2
27 Inadequate glass in doors H 5.7.3
28 No or inadequate protection against dragging of fingers on sliding L 5.7.4
car or landing doors with glass
29 No or inadequate lighting on landing doors M 5.7.5
30 No or inadequate protective devices on power operated doors H 5.7.6
31 Unsafe locking device of landing door H 5.7.7
32 Unlocking of landing door without a special tool H 5.7.8.1
33 Well enclosure with perforate walls near door locks H 5.7.8.2
34 No automatic closing device on sliding doors H 5.7.9
35 Inadequate link between panels of landing doors M 5.7.10
36 Inadequate fire resistance of landing doors M 5.7.11
37 Car door moving with open landing door M 5.7.12
54
Nr. HazardlHazardous situation
Hazard
HML
EN:81-80
Suitably
Controlled
Additional measured required
Residual Risk
Rating HML
38 Large car area in relation to rated load L 5.8.1
39 Inadequate length of car apron H 5.8.2
40 Car without doors H 5.8.3
41 Unsafe locking of car roof trap door M 5.8.4
42 Insufficient strength of car roof L 5.8.5
43 No or inadequate balustrade on car H 5.8.6
44 Insufficient ventilation in car M 5.8.7
45 Inadequate lighting in car M 5.8.8.1
46 No or inadequate emergency lighting in car M
5.8.8.2
47
No or inadequate protection means on sheaves,pulleys and
sprockets against injury
M 5.9.1
48
No or inadequate protection against rope/chains leaving the
sheaves, pulleys or sprockets
M 5.9.1
49
No or inadequate protection means on sheaves, pulleys or
sprockets against introduction of objects
L 5.9.1
50
No or inadequate safety gear and/or overspeed governor on
electric lifts
H 5.9.2
51 No or inadequate slack rope switch for governor rope M 5.9.3
52
No protection means against ascending car overspeed on traction
drive lifts with counterweight
H 5.9.4
53 Inadequate design of lift machine for electric lifts H
5.9.4,
5.12.1
54
No or inadequate protection against free fall,overspeed and
creeping on hydraulic lifts
H 5.9.5
55 Counterweight or balancing weight guided by 2 wire ropes L 5.10.1
55
56 No or inadequate buffers H 5.10.2
Nr. HazardlHazardous situation
Hazard
HML
EN:81-80
Suitably
Controlled
Additional measured required
Residual Risk
Rating HML
57 No or inadequate final limit switches L 5.10.3
58 Large gap between car and wall facing the car entrance H 5.11.1
59 Excessive distance between car door and landing door H 5.11.2
60 No or inadequate emergency operation system H 5.12.2
61 No shut-off valve L 5.12.3
62 No independent starting contactors H 5.12.4
63 No or inadequate slack rope/chain device M 5.12.5
64 No run-time limiter L 5.12.6
65 No or inadequate low pressure device M 5.12.7
66
Insufficient protection against electric shock and/or marking of
electrical equipment; missing notices
H 5.13.1
67 No or inadequate protection on lift machine motor L 5.13.2
68 No lockable main switch M 5.13.3
69 No protection against phase reversal L 5.14.1
70
No or inadequate inspection control station and stopping device on
car roof
H 5.14.2
71 No or inadequate alarm device H 5.14.3
72
No or inadequate communication system between machine room
and car (travel height> 30 m)
M 5.14.4
73 No or inadequate load control on car L 5.14.5
74 Missing notices, markings and operating instructions M 5.15
56
A Confirm no asbestos
B
Check H&S file where it exists
C
Confirm electrical safety
D
Confirm safe working arrangement – permits as required – give
details below.
E Ageed system with client / representive
F
On completion: work – update log / report book. Report to client and
update.
G
Are any other persons affected by this work?
Additional Comments:
Permits required: Y / N
If Y – which:
Date of R/A Work is complete
Work can commence Signature Contractor Contractor Time:
Y / N Signature Client Client
57
CHILTERN LIFT COMPANY: Authorisation To Commence Work
Do not commence work without authorisation from the site manager / representative
Briefly describe the Job:
Todays
date
Manager’s Name Company
Basic Risk Assessment – Indicate which hazards are ( Low
/ Med / High)
State control measures required.
(attach sheet if necessary)
Building Managers
Authorisation:
Asbestos Electricity Heights Slips /Trips Job may
commence
From :
To:
 Fire Procedure is agreed
 First Aid is agreed
 Waste disposal
 Risks to others
 Asbestos register checked
 Other – state:
Lone
Working
Fire Fumes Noise
Car
Movement
Tools Manual
Handling
Guarding
Chemical Access – car
top / machine
room
Other – state Initials
Engineer’s
Signature
---------------------------------------------------------------------
Continuation: The assessment is still relevant as at the date given below:
Date Initials Date Initials Date Initials Date Initials Date Initials
58
IF YOU ARE ASKED TO CARRY OUT A RISK
ASSESSMENT ON SITE FOR A PARTICULAR ACTIVITY
THE FOLLOWING MAY BE OF HELP
1. Analyse the Task or Process:
What has to be done? Where will it be done? Who will do
the work?
2. Identify the Hazards:
Not only in the work activity but are there hazardous
because of where the work is being carried out etc? Use the
standard 74 point check list. Consider any other factors that
may apply.
3. Identify Those at Risk:
Colleagues ? Customers ? Other trades? The general
public?
4. Assess the Risk:
How likely is it to happen? How severe the outcomes if it
did.
5. Introduce Control Measures:
How can you minimise the risk?
Does the work have to be done at all?
Is there a less hazardous way?
7. Record:
Write down the significant factors of the assessment.
8. Provide Information and Training:
All those involved or affected should be made aware of any necessary precautions.
9. Be aware of changes in working conditions
Any change may warrant a fresh risk assessment and method statement.
10. Monitor: Constantly check that all is well
Enter any additional control measures here:
59
CHILTERN LIFT CO.
HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY
MANUAL HANDLING
60
Definitions Manual handling operations means any transporting
or supporting of a load including lifting, putting down,
pushing, pulling, carrying or moving by hand or bodily
force.
Injury in relation to manual handling does not include
injury caused by any toxic or corrosive substance
which has leaked or spilled or contaminates the
surface of the load.
A significant operation is a manual handling operation
which in the preliminary judgement of a supervisor or
an assessor might be a hazardous operation and
therefore requires a formal assessment to be carried
out.
A hazardous operation is a manual handling
operation which assessment shows to have the
potential to cause injury.
A manual handling assessor is a person trained to
carry out assessments.
See Fig. 1
Manual
Handling
Guidelines.
Relevant
Legislation Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992
Additional
Information
HSE booklet L23 'Manual Handling: Guidance on
Regulations'
HSE publication 'Getting to Grips with Manual
Handling'
HSE’s Manual Handling Assessment Charts
(cf. http://.www.hse.gov.uk)
Cf. also 'http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/manlinde.htm'
61
Manual Handling GENERALLY.
Manual Handling is a serious issue in the workplace. Even simple lifting and moving
tasks, done badly and repeated often, can lead to strain injuries which affect both working
and personal life. By ensuring that the correct methods are used in lifting and handling a
great deal of lost time and personal suffering can be avoided. The following strategy is
suggested.
Manual Handling Assessor / Coordinator.
The Company has appointed a manual handling coordinator. This person is responsible
for ensuring that all significant m/h tasks are identified, assessed and suitably controlled.
Manual Handling Co-ordinator is: Alan Ringer
Identify all Manual Handling tasks
All manual handling tasks must then be identified and preferably written down.
By following the flow chart (see below), and considering in particular Fig 1 – it will be
possible to identify those tasks that need only a simple assessment.
For very serious tasks a detailed risk assessment (appendix 2) is required – if they cannot
be avoided.
Eliminate or Mechanise.
A key exercise is to look carefully at the workplace and see what frequent tasks can be
mechanised, or avoided all together.
Assess and record as appropriate.
Should you find that there are several tasks which need assessing, it is important that
these assessments are recorded and that the people concerned are made aware of the
outcome.
They must have sufficient information and training.
A copy of the assessments should be kept in a generally accessible H&S file.
Review
If there are new tasks which occur, or significant changes in working practices, the
assessments should be reviewed and altered accordingly. Manual handling risk
assessments, training in manual handling and any recorded injuries should be considered
at the local safety committee as often as is necessary.
INITIAL ASSESSMENT
Use the flow chart to see if there’s a need for a more formal assessment on the
tasks identified on the previous page.
62
Fig. 1
Manual Handling Operations
GUIDELINE FIGURES – These figures illustrate the maximum loads to be handled at the different
arm positions.
Is there a risk of injury from manual handling?
(cf. fig 1) No
Can manual handling be avoided?
Can the task be mechanised or redesigned to reduce the
risk to an insignificant level?
Carry out a risk assessment
Formal risk assessment not necessary but
review if conditions change significantly.
Yes
No
No
Yes
Yes
63
NB. Maximum when seated: 3 Kg (women), 5 Kg (men)
64
Assessment form
Risk Assessment Checklist
Section A - Preliminary: * Circle as appropriate
Job Description: Is an assessment needed?
(i.e. is there a potential risk for injury and are the
factors beyond the limits of the guidelines?
Yes/No*
If 'Yes' continue. If 'No' the assessment need go no further.
Operations covered by this assessment
(detailed description):
Locations:
Personnel involved:
Date of assessment:
Diagrams (other information):
Section B - See over for detailed analysis
Section C - Overall assessment of the risk of injury? Low / Med / High*
Section D - Remedial action to be taken:
Remedial steps that should be taken, in order of priority:
1
2
3
4
5
Date by which action should be taken:
Date for reassessment:
Assessor's name: Signature:
TAKE ACTION ... AND CHECK THAT IT HAS THE DESIRED EFFECT
65
Section B - More detailed assessment, where necessary:
Questions to consider: If yes, tick appropriate
level of risk.
Problems occurring from the
task. (Make rough notes in this
column in preparation for the
possible remedial action to be
taken)
Possible remedial action.
(Possible changes to be made to
system/task, load, workplace/
space, environment.
Communication that is needed)
Low Med High
The tasks - do they involve:
 holding loads away from trunk?
 twisting?
 stooping?
 reaching upwards?
 large vertical movement (from floor
level)?
 long carrying distances (over 10
metres)?
 strenuous pushing or pulling?
 repetitive handing (over 30 times an
hour)?
 prolonged physical effort (more than
one hour)?
 insufficient rest or recovery?
 insufficient assistance (team handling
required)?
 a rate imposed by a process?
The loads - are they:
 heavy?
 bulky/unwieldy?
 difficult to grasp?
 unstable/unpredictable (inc.
contents)?
 intrinsically harmful (e.g. sharp/ hot)?
 lacking adequate handles, etc. or
difficult to grip?
 difficult to see round or over?
 needing sealed lids or closures?
 containing dangerous/fragile/caustic
materials?
The working environment - are there:
 constraints on posture?
 poor floors?
 variations in levels?
 hot/cold/humid conditions?
 strong air movements/adverse
weather conditions?
 poor lighting conditions?
 difficulties with storage (too high, too
low, awkward access)?
 obstructions to movement and
handling?
Individual capability - does the job:
 require unusual capability?
 hazard those with a health problem?
 hazard those who are pregnant?
 call for special information/training?
Other factors:
Is movement or posture hindered by
clothing or personal protective
equipment?
No. in each category:
Risk factor multiplier
Column Scores
x 1 x 2 x 3
Total Score =
Risk Category =
RULES FOR PERSONS INVOLVED IN MANUAL HANDLING
LOW = 20
MED = 21-29
HIGH = 30+
66
Examine the load to be moved for hazards and study how best to tackle the problem. This
will mean giving consideration to the height, shape, and position of the load.
Follow the appropriate safe system of work in which you have been trained for the
handling of loads and use kinetic handling techniques where appropriate to avoid injury.
Before moving a load, ensure that it does not obstruct your view.
Inform your immediate supervisor of any personal condition that may require review of
your manual handling activities, e.g. medical condition, pregnancy.
Consider whether there will be any obstacles in your path, any slipping, tripping or falling
hazards, any stairways to be negotiated.
If there is any doubt as to the correct manual handling arrangement, seek advice from your
immediate supervisor.

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Full HS policy

  • 1. Health & Safety Policy The Chiltern Lift Company Ltd ALL TYPES OF LIFT INSTALLATIONS, SERVICING, REFURBISHMENT AND REPAIRS 8 FURLONG ROAD, BOURNE END, BUCKS, SL8 5DG www.chilternlifts.co.uk T: 01628 529247 F: 01628 810821 E: enquiries@chilternlifts.co.uk Issue 1.5 - January 2013 © The Chiltern Lift Company Limited 2013
  • 2. 2 The Chiltern Lift Company Limited Health & Safety Policy Section One Statement
  • 3. 3 Statement of Policy The policy of The Chiltern Lifts Co Ltd is to ensure a safe and healthy workplace at all times in all aspects of our business. We aim to minimise the risk of harm so far as is reasonably practicable, to both people and the environment throughout the life- cycle of our goods and/or services. As Director it is my belief that Health, Safety and Environmental (HS&E) issues are a management responsibility of equal importance as Quality and Service. As a company we are committed to achieving our policy aim and will ensure an effective system for planning, organising, controlling, monitoring and reviewing of the preventive and protective measures associated with our business. As a minimum standard we will comply with the appropriate legislation. In particular we are committed to ensuring: (a) the provision and maintenance of plant and systems of work that are, so far as is reasonably practicable, safe and without risks to health; (b) arrangements for ensuring, so far as is reasonably practicable, safety and absence of risks to health in connection with the use, handling, storage and transport of articles and substances; (c) the provision of such information, instruction, training and supervision as is necessary to ensure, so far as is reasonably practicable, the Health & Safety at work of employees; (d) so far as is reasonably practicable as regards any place of work under our control, the maintenance of it in a condition that is safe and without risks to health and the provision and maintenance of means of access to and egress from it that are safe and without such risks; (e) the provision and maintenance of a working environment that is, so far as is reasonably practicable, safe, without risks to health, and adequate as regards facilities and arrangements for welfare at work. We will employ the following principles in seeking to achieve our aim (a) avoiding risks (b) evaluating identified risks which cannot be avoided (c) combating risks at source (d) adapting work to the individual, especially as regards the design of workplaces, the choice of work equipment and the system of work (e) adapting to technical progress; (f) replacing the dangerous by the non-dangerous or the less dangerous; (g) developing a coherent overall prevention policy which covers technology, organisation of work, working conditions, and the influence of factors relating to the working environment; (h) giving collective protective measures priority over individual protective measures; and (i) giving appropriate instructions and information to employees. This policy will be monitored throughout the year and reviewed at least every 24 months. Signed: S. Festorazzi Date: 10/01/2014
  • 4. 4 The Chiltern Lift Company Limited Health & Safety Policy Section Two Organisation
  • 5. 5 Section 2: Organising Health and Safety Structure- Chiltern Lift Co. The Managing Director Role : To develop and achieve the policy aims. Responsibilities: o Responsible for all aspects of HS&E in respect of Chiltern Lifts. o He will o receive advice through the Quality Manager and external sources including HSE, British Standards, and recognised professional institutions (LEIA) o Chair the Safety Management Group. o Ensure the agreed safety plan is adequately resourced , monitored and implemented. Managing Director Technical / Operations Director Quality /Safety Manager Domestic Co- ordinator (premises) Lifts Co- ordinator (Site) Trained Fitters & assistants Sub-Contractors Tester Snr Engineers & assistants
  • 6. 6 Quality and Safety Manager: Role: The Quality manager will ensure that the policy is implemented effectively on a day-to-day basis. Responsibilities: o Advise the MD on HS&E issues / performance o Liaise with appropriate external sources. o Monitor implementation of policy at local and company level o Provide advice and guidance within his competency to staff / management. Seek external advice as appropriate. o Identify and create relevant performance standards. o Maintain the relevant H&S documentation, ensuring documentation is reviewed at appropriate intervals and up to date. o Provide reports and information to the Safety Management Group. o Undertake all necessary reporting internally / externally – including any accidents. o Investigate accidents / incidents and make the necessary reports. o Compile relevant statistics, including accident figures, for consideration by the Safety Group. o Monitor training and competency- identify and arrange additional training as required. o Ensure changes in legislation and compliance issues are adequately addressed. o Issue / Withdraw as appropriate any changes in procedures, minutes of formal discussions etc as per the controlled documents system o Consult with all relevant parties as appropriate.
  • 7. 7 Domestic Lift Co-ordinator: Role: Ensure appropriate HS&E standards on all domestic premises works Responsibility: o Ensures a safe system of work is identified o A safe system of work is a formal procedure, resulting from a risk assessment, which specifies safe methods of work to ensure that relevant hazards are eliminated and the remaining risks are minimised. o Liaison with client and agree necessary precautions and safe method of working. o Ensure appropriate arrangements for disposal of waste associated with projects. o Document agreed safe working method o Ensure on-site staff are competent o Safety of all tools / plant / equipment is suitable and in good condition o Meet internal company standards o Consult with Quality Manager and other relevant parties as necessary. Lift Co-ordinator Role: Ensure effective HS&E standards on all working (non-domestic) sites. Responsibilities: o Ensures a Safe System of Work for all (non-domestic) sites. o A safe system of work is a formal procedure, resulting from a risk assessment, which specifies safe methods of work to ensure that relevant hazards are eliminated and the remaining risks are minimised. o Liaison with client / principal contractor as necessary and agree precautions and safe method of working. o Ensure appropriate arrangements for disposal of waste associated with projects. o Document agreed safe working method o Ensure on-site staff are competent o Safety of all tools / plant / equipment is suitable and in good condition o Meet internal company standards o Consult with Quality Manager and other relevant parties as necessary. o Where CDM applies:
  • 8. 8 o Where Chiltern Lifts is the principal contractor ensure appropriate notifications. o Appoint the necessary co-ordinator. o Develop the H&S plan o Ensure Client is briefed on responsibilities o Develop and maintain the H&S file. o Make the H&S file available as appropriate. Tester: Role: To exercise professional judgement on the standard of work produced by on- site staff and sub-contracted labour. Responsibility: o To maintain his personal professional standards and competence at all times. o To undertake rigorous compliance checks against current agreed standards. (The Tester will ensure that all personnel are familiar with and suitably tested against the appropriate safe method of working - in particular to meet the relevant BS 7255:2001 (as amended).) o To make and provide reports as appropriate o To highlight any concerns through the appropriate channels. (Client / Quality Manager / Lift Co-ordinator) o To advise on any defect or remedial actions required as necessary. Fitters & Assistants / Senior Engineers / Sub-contractors. Role: To carry out work as per the agreed safe system of work Responsibilities. o To work to the agreed standards using the safe working method o To report any concerns regarding HS&E they might have on-site o Only to undertake works which are safe and does not expose himself or others to uncontrolled risks. o In the event of an accident, ensure the area is made safe and immediately report the accident to the Office.
  • 9. 9 General Responsibilities of Employees: o All employees have a responsibility to take reasonable care of themselves and others who may be affected by their acts or omissions at work. o They must co-operate with Supervisors and Managers to achieve a healthy and safe work place, including using any personal protective equipment or other measures supplied for H&S purposes o They must not interfere with or misuse anything provided under the statutory provisions for the health, safety and welfare of employees. o They must report any deficiencies or concerns in respect of Health & Safety arrangements to any Director or the company Safety Advisor. This may be done either directly or using the internal email system. Any written issue raised as an item will be responded to by the appropriate manager as a priority. (Within 1 working day from date of receipt) As necessary: o Assist in accident investigation so that measures can be introduced to prevent recurrence. o Familiarise themselves with, and strictly adhere to, the provisions and guidance notes contained in the booklet "Safety In Working On Lifts And Escalators" received by all company employees or available in the company Health and Safety Register.
  • 10. 10 Controls Onsite: All work is to be strictly controlled by a safe working method (safe system of work) based on a thorough assessment of risks in compliance with BS EN 81 80 2003. A safe system of work is a formal procedure, resulting from a risk assessment, which specifies safe methods of work to ensure that relevant hazards are eliminated and the remaining risks are minimised. The appropriate risk control measures will be identified and implemented for all activities involving significant residual risks. While generic assessments may be used as the basis of a risk assessment – each site / project must be considered in its own right and controls identified accordingly. Communications Requirements: The HSWA 1974, s.2 (2) (c) requires “the provision of such information, instruction and supervision as is necessary...”, and s.2 (6) requires employers to consult representatives over arrangements which will enable the employer and employees to co-operate effectively. Reg. 10 of MHSWR 1999 requires employers to provide employees with comprehensible and relevant information on risks to their health and safety, preventive and protective measures, and emergency procedures. Generally Chiltern Lift Co. benefits from effective communications due to its size and structure. Communications are largely direct and informal. Staff are encouraged to discuss issues with colleagues and this happens on a daily basis. Any H&S concerns may be brought to the attention of a supervisor / manager for their attention. (See below Urgent / Non urgent H&S issues). Formal Communications Work activity is governed by an approved Quality Control system. This is to be followed at all times in terms of ensuring that all personnel are clear on working to the agreed standard within the agreed safe system of work. Any formal communications e.g.
  • 11. 11 o Minutes of meetings o Policy changes o Procedures revisions / forms etc must be recorded and entered onto the system for records purposes. As appropriate staff are to be informed and where necessary inducted in e.g. any change of system of work, or the use of / introduction of new equipment. The Quality / Safety Manager will issue the necessary controlled documentation if appropriate. Staff may also formally report an issue which they consider to be either hazardous or a deficiency in the H&S system. The details should be made in writing and addressed to the Managing Director or in his absence the Quality and Safety Manager who should respond within 3 working days. Consultation with Employees Where there is likely to be a significant change in working practices affecting the Health & Safety of staff, the Safety Group will consult as appropriate. This may be by emailing or by asking for input from staff, or invitation to attend at the Safety Management Group meeting. The Safety Management Group meeting will be the forum covering: o New systems of work o New technology o Appointment of external contractors o Environmental issues o Risk control systems o Compliance issues o Health & Safety training o Purchasing and any other topic affecting health safety or the environment. Staff are encouraged to report any H&S concerns they have. If there is a specific issue which a member of staff believes should be addressed it should be raised in the first instance with their supervisor / manager, and / or discussed with the company Quality & Safety Manager. Non-Urgent Issues Staff are encouraged to draw attention to any defects in the health and safety system or operational standards, or make suggestions as to how they might be improved.
  • 12. 12 Any non-urgent perceived shortcomings in provisions for health, safety and welfare must be reported through line management and include the Quality / Safety Manager. This can be done in writing (see Hazard report form – Appendix 1 below) or reported through the Office. Any formal communication received for H&S purposes must be addressed and an initial written response, which can include email, made within 3 working days by the appropriate manager. Urgent H&S issues Any urgent issues must be immediately drawn to the attention of a supervisor, manager or director of the company who will address the issue as appropriate. This is a requirement on all staff and sub-contractors. Urgent issues include anything that could cause imminent harm. Statutory Notices In accordance with the provisions of the Health & Safety (Consultation with Employees) Regulations 1996, a poster informing employees in general terms about the requirements of Health & Safety law will be displayed in the main company office on the notice display board. This information will be issued in leaflet form for employees who work away from the premises. Employees are required read the information contained in the poster or leaflet carefully, as it describes the key points of the duties of the employer and employee respectively under the laws relating to Health & Safety. Employees will be expected to sign a register accepting that this information has been made readily available and if necessary explained to them. Information is also provided on the local addresses of the enforcing authority for Health & Safety law. The Local Authority Environmental Health Department is to be found at: Environmental Health Department Buckinghamshire County Council Civic Centre Walton Street Tel: 01296 395000 Aylesbury HP20 1UX www.buckscc.gov.uk The Employment Medical Advisory Service (EMAS) can be contacted at: European Medical Advisory Service (EMAS) 109 Bancroft Tel: Hitchin www.emas-medical.com Herts SG5 1NB
  • 13. 13 Safety Management Group The purpose of the Safety Management group is to plan, implement, monitor and review the policy. It is the primary vehicle through which the company policy aims are to be achieved. It will draw up an annual safety plan, based on its stated aims against risk-based priorities. It will meet every 12 weeks to monitor and review Health & Safety performance in achieving policy aims. Minutes of key issues and actions should be held. The Group should prepare an annual report for the Board of Directors. The Safety Management Group will consist of: (confirm with CLC). The Managing Director, The Quality & Safety Manager The Operations Manager The Lift Co-ordinator A Tester Additional representative by invitation To this end it will consider: The safety Plan Feedback from Projects including site inspections. Incidents occurring Office based issues including inspections Safety Management Group Plant, Equipt Tools Purchasing ; Sub- contractors Procedures Training Reporting Policy / Planning Responsibilities
  • 14. 14 Environmental issues including storage and disposal of waste Training and Development – including first aid / CSCS cards / Management training Compliance checks – e.g. changes in British Standards Policy / Consultation issues Company aims Legal developments Any other issues as may be appropriate. This meeting may also be used to update managers on professional issues by means of a briefing given by one of the team. Notes of the meeting will be made and made available for all staff. Site Safety Meetings Where The Chiltern Lift Co is a sub-contractor on a site. Any general safety meetings on site in respect of trade contractors will be attended by the on-site supervisor or the manager responsible for the day to day management of Health & Safety for the duration of the contract. Other meetings will be attended as agreed within the H&S plan. Training / Information Induction for Staff 1. The policy document is to be readily available to all staff. Essential H&S information will be explained to any new member of staff, including temporary staff and any particular systems of work or particular issues discussed before work commences. A record is to be held of any such training. 2. As appropriate, risk assessments are to be completed in respect of the work being undertaken, and any necessary control measures discussed and implemented. This will include training or equipments needs. 3. The responsible Supervisor or Manager will explain and discuss the policy as relevant to the employee’s work, to ensure understanding. New staff will be positively supported throughout their period of probation and are encouraged to raise any H&S issues with their colleagues and / or line manager. 4. A review will be undertaken by the relevant Line Manager or Supervisor within a 3 month period. Where further training or related safety needs are identified these are to be agreed and met within a reasonable timescale.
  • 15. 15 Sub-Contracted Labour: Depending on the site and the project requirements, induction training on site will follow the Principal Contractor’s requirements. As a minimum sub-contractors are to be briefed on: Fire safety First aid Welfare facilities PPE requirements and Specific risk control measures as identified from the assessment process. Where any changes occur to these, supervisors should confirm that the changes have been clearly understood by staff. Particular attention is to be paid to any sub- contractor who may not have English as a first language. General Training Health & Safety training will be provided as agreed through the Safety Group and with the Quality and Safety Manager. The Safety Group retain the overview of developments in technical and associated issues and must identify where particular training may be required to maintain professional competencies throughout. Regular safety briefings by a nominated person on Health & Safety matters including changes in legislation, government campaigns or significant developments are advised. Office Staff Health & Safety training to Staff will take place as agreed through the Safety Group and arranged by the Quality and Safety Manager. In-house training should include o Fire safety o Workstations o Manual handling Where external training is required, e.g. CSCS , first aid certificate, this well be supplied as required. All members of staff will be updated on any changes in the Health & Safety management system in both written, (email) and verbal format as changes occur.
  • 16. 16 On-Site Information / Induction On larger (CDM) projects induction information may be provided by the Principle Contractor, prior to the commencement of work on site. (See above: ‘Sub-contracted labour’) This will act as ‘Day 1’ induction briefing / tool-box talk. Should this not take place the following information must be made clear to all Chiltern Lift Co. staff: o The layout of the site, o Fire precaution devices, o Fire exit routes, o Welfare facilities o Permit to Work System (as appropriate) The workplace itself must be shown to new personnel and any hazards pointed out with the measures in place to control risks. Where changes occur to any of the above, staff are to be updated. Method Statements: Staff, including sub-contractors must keep a copy of the agreed method statement either with them or held in the appropriate tool box at all times. Sub-contractors must sign that they have received the method statement and adhere to the method identified. Where changes in procedure are required these are to be agreed with the relevant parties. This includes the method of work, use of materials or plant and equipment. Reports Safety Management Group: The Safety Group will report on performance to the Board once per year. Key topics will include, progress on the safety plan, incident data and training. Site Reports Site reports, consisting of the job card, risk assessment and method statement and any other relevant document should be held for all contracts. Site Logs are to be completed / updated and copies held for quality purposes. A Inspections Work on-site All work areas are to be inspected by the relevant supervisor and significant comments recorded for records purposes. These should form part of the site report.
  • 17. 17 A company Tester / competent person will inspect the work undertaken, and make a record of significant findings. These will be held in the contract site report. As necessary a copy of relevant documentation should be made available for the premises / owner. Any defects are to be reported using the standard report form. Any statutory reports and registers are to be completed in compliance with legislation including as specified in the appropriate Schedule. A copy should be held in the site report. Incident Reporting For working purposes an ‘incident’ is anything untoward that happens which wasn’t supposed to happen and either did or could have resulted in harm to people or damage to equipment. (‘Harm’ means any injury requiring first aid or more). An ‘accident’ – should be understood as an incident which results in harm to someone - a member of staff or public. All accidents should be recorded in the accident book or accident report form. Where they result in time lost from work –these are to be investigated by the Quality and Safety Manager and where necessary reported in accordance with the Reporting of Injuries Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations. (RIDDOR) (refer to Arrangement for reporting accidents).
  • 18. 18 Cooperation The Company is fully aware of its obligation to cooperate with any agent who has duties to perform by or under respective statutory requirements. To this end it will fully cooperate with other organisations as appropriate. In particular the following measure will be taken: On-site: 1. The site supervisor / senior engineer will ensure that he cooperates as appropriate with any persons having duties to perform by or under relevant provisions for Health and Safety purposes e.g. Fire Safety. 2. It is important that any activities which may interfere with the work in hand are identified and suitable arrangements agreed to ensure that risks are kept under control e.g. out of hours work, permits to work etc. Such arrangements are to be included as necessary in the appropriate method statement. 3. On projects covered by the CDM regulations, the site supervisor will ensure cooperation as per local site rules. Competence All personnel As per the requirements of BS EN 81-80:2003 and associated British Standard 7255: 2001, all persons who might at any time o Be working on a lift or related equipment, o Be working within a well, pit, machinery space or pulley room, or o Be carrying out risk assessments, will possess demonstrable competence in basic lift safety and procedures, or be under relevant supervision. All sub-contracted personnel must be able to demonstrate either a minimum level of qualification (EMTA NVQ EOR / 202 or equivalent). Lift craftspersons (fitters) Lift craftspersons should have a minimum qualification of EMTA NVQ Level 3 or its equivalent and meet the general requirements as specified in BS7255:2001 (as amended)
  • 19. 19 Lift inspectors and engineer surveyors Will as a minimum stipulation, be competent in their practising trade. They will also possess demonstrable competence in the safe operation of all lift equipment. As necessary they will be required to seek appropriate ongoing safety training to maintain and /or develop their skills. Lift adjusters/testers (or persons carrying out such functions) Lift adjusters/testers will have a minimum qualification of the following o EMTA NVQ units at Level 4: UC401, Health and safety within industry; EMTAUC402, Working with data and information; as well as one or both of the following: o UT403, Performing testing operations; o UT405, Performing commissioning tests on plant and equipment. They will be trained in safe working procedures and will have the experience, skill and knowledge to undertake the commissioning of lifts following installation or refurbishment. Assessment In the absence of formal qualification – a company Tester and / or Operations Manager will approve individual competence in the above, or otherwise, on a case by case basis. Risk control systems A risk control system is system for ensuring that the identified control measures are in place for a job.
  • 20. 20 Appendix 1. Hazard Report To: c.c. Date From: I have reason to believe that the following condition below could cause injury, damage or have an adverse effect on someone’s health Issue of concern Where is the hazard? Building Floor Room/Area Identify the hazard – tick the appropriate box(es) below: Asbestos Burns / Scalds Chemicals Dust / Fumes Electrical Fire Fall From Height Handling Lighting Machinery Obstruction Proximity Sharps (needles / glass) Struck by something Space Tripping / Slipping Ventilation Vehicles Other: Briefly describe the Hazard /Issue (continue on separate sheet if requ’d) Indicate the level of risk associated with this hazard: High  Medium  Low  Manager’s Response: I have investigated the above circumstances. Risk control measures are adequate/inadequate (delete as necessary). The following action will be implemented within ……. Day(s) / Week(s):
  • 21. 21 The Chiltern Lift Company Limited Health & Safety Policy Section Three Arrangements
  • 22. 22 Section 3: Arrangements Section 3 : Arrangements .......................................................................22 Fire Procedure:.......................................................................................23 First Aid Arrangements .............................................................................3 Accident reporting.....................................................................................4 Incident/ Accident reporting ......................................................................4 Risk Assessments;....................................................................................5 Reporting Hazards....................................................................................6 Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) ......................................................7 Manual Handling.......................................................................................7 Training / Supervision: ..............................................................................7 Work at height...........................................................................................8 Asbestos...................................................................................................8 Sub-Contractors........................................................................................8 Welfare Facilities ......................................................................................9 Maintenance of Work Equipment..............................................................8 Electrical Work and Safe Isolation Procedures.......................................13 Consultation............................................................................................17 Chiltern Risk Assessment Form..............................................................19 Chiltern Hazard Report form. ..................................................................20
  • 23. 23 Introduction: This section contains both an outline of the arrangements which have been made, and where appropriate refers to the more detailed arrangements which are issued as a discreet item, forming part of the safety manual for the company. Fire Procedure: These procedures relate to works being carried out at both customer sites and at the Company main office. When at external customer sites it is the employees responsibility to familiarize themselves with site fire and emergency procedures. If you discover a fire, operate the nearest alarm or, if no alarm is provided, shout “FIRE” If you hear the fire alarm, leave the building via the nearest available escape route and go to the designated assembly area. Lifts must not be used in the event of a fire. Emergency services – in the event of a fire or other serious accident or incident requiring the attendance of an emergency service:  Dial 999 emergency services  State precise location along with any details regarding the nature of the emergency that the operator may request  Await confirmation that your message has been understood  If possible, arrange for someone to be at the main entrance of the building to meet with the emergency services upon arrival. IN THE EVENT OF FIRE General  Raise alarm  Establish exact location of fire,  What materials are involved,  Size of fire,  Risk to life by checking affected area if safely possible. All Areas If there is no risk, limit spread of fire by use of fire extinguishers. Fire Action
  • 24. 24 It is your duty to prevent fire, to know what action to take in the event of fire and to ensure that you are familiar with means of escape from fire. First Aid Arrangements The sequence given is guidance for treating adult casualties. Basic first aid facilities are to be found in the main Company offices and in each engineers van. 1 ASSESS SITUATION  Are there any risks to you or the casualty? 2 CHECK CASUALTY  Is the casualty conscious? 3 CHECK RESPONSE  Do they respond to your voice or gentle stimulation? 4 OPEN AIRWAY, CHECK BREATHING  Open airway and check for breathing.  Is casualty breathing normally? Yes  Put your safety first. If possible remove the danger or move away from danger.  If unsafe, call for emergency help and wait for it to arrive. Yes Yes Yes No No No No  ARE YOU ALONE Yes No  Check other conditions and treat as necessary.  Summon help if required.  Check other conditions ( as below), treat as necessary.  Summon help if required.  Place casualty in recovery position.  Summon help if required.  Is the unconsciousness due to drowning? Yes No
  • 25. 25 Accident reporting.  The accident record book is to be found at the main Company offices.  When reporting any accident or dangerous occurances be sure to detail exactly where, when and how the incident occurred. Incident/ Accident reporting For working purposes an ‘incident’ is anything untoward that happens which wasn’t supposed to happen and either did or could have resulted in harm to people or damage to equipment. (‘Harm’ means any injury requiring first aid or more). Any incident indicates that something wasn’t sufficiently controlled and acts as important information – possibly preventing a more serious occurrence. It is important that any significant incident is reported. An ‘accident’ – should be understood as an incident which results in harm to someone - a member of staff or public. All accidents should be recorded in the accident book or accident report form. Where an accident results in time lost from work –these are to be investigated by the Quality and Safety Manager and where necessary reported in accordance with the Reporting of Injuries Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations. Cf: Reporting Accidents to HSE. (http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/online.htm) Cf: Reporting Accidents to HSE. (http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/online.htm) Reporting of Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Some accidents must be reported to the Health & Safety Executive. In particular: o Accidents which result in absence from work for more than three days including non-working days but excluding the day on which the accident occurred must be reported (on form F2508) within ten days of the accident or online.  Ask a helper to call an ambulance and to pass on details of the casualty’s condition.  MOVE TO STEP 5  Give 5 rescue breathes and carry out CPR for 1 minute before calling ambulance.  MOVE TO STEP 5  Call ambulkance then continue CPR sequence  MOVE TO STEP 55 COMMENCE CPR SEQUENCE  Give 30 chest compressions  Give 2 rescue breathes  Continue chest compressions followed by rescue breathes until: - Emergency helps over; - The casualty starts to breathe normally; - You are too exhausted to continue.  WARNING: If at anytime the casualty starts to breathe normally, place them in the recovery position.
  • 26. 26 o Accidents resulting in a serious injury or with someone being taken to hospital or being injured through violence. The Supervisor or Manager must obtain as much information immediately after the accident. Wherever possible they must photograph or sketch the scene. Written notes must be taken. All significant accidents will be investigated by the Company, who will cooperate in any wider investigation by other agencies. In the case of fatal accidents, specified major injury or dangerous occurrences, the enforcing authority must be notified immediately by the quickest practical means (normally by telephone - 0845 300 99 23). A written report (on Form F2508) must also be made forthwith or within ten days of the accident or reported online.(http://www.hse.gov.uk/riddor/online.htm) Dangerous occurrences, which are also reportable, on form F2508A include collapse of certain lifting equipment and scaffolding, accidental ignition of explosives or the release of large quantities of highly inflammable liquids, even if no injury is caused. o A record of reportable injuries must be entered into the Company or Contract Accident Book and salient details noted. Such records will be kept for at least three years o The Quality and Safety Manager must be informed immediately of any major incident whether it leads to injury / damage or not. o The local EHO or the HSE may carry out its own investigation at the scene of an accident. o The Supervisor / Manager is responsible for gathering initial information on all accidents which occur on the Company's premises. The contract supervisor / senior engineer is responsible on contract sites. Each is responsible for liaising with the relevant departmental management and supervisory staff during the investigation of an accident. It is essential to ensure that the appropriate remedial action is taken by the person(s) responsible on a day to day basis for the safety of the area concerned. List of Emergency Telephone Numbers Service Telephone number: Gas emergency 01753 571570 Consider evacuation Water 01628 528185 Isolate and ensure main office informed Electricity supply 01635 521333 Telephone 151 Risk Assessments; 1. Risk assessments are required for all work activities. What When / Who Office 8 Furlong Road Q&S Manager to undertake all office related assessments – using simple form (cf Appendix 1 below) Annually/ Q&S Manager. Sites Domestic Sites & Non-Domestic Sites Detailed risk assessments are included in the ‘Arrangements for Lift co-ordinators to ensure all assessments completed and form part of the site report.
  • 27. 27 general working on site’ document. Records A copy of the significant findings of all risk assessments is to be made and held on record as part of site reports Safety Group to review annually (or earlier as required). Generics Generic Risk Assessments may be used as the basis of site specific assessments. The 74 point checklist should be adapted accordingly – refer to detailed arrangements R/A form given below. Method Statements Method statements are to be developed from site specific risk assessments Coordinators / Engineers as required. Reporting Hazards Item Action Standard Reporting: Hazard reports may be verbal or written. Verbally In the first instance discuss with supervisor / manager, and / or the company Quality & Safety Manager In writing Email or write to Quality and Safety Manager or any manager / director. Use report form given below Any urgent issues must be immediately drawn to the attention of a supervisor, manager or director of the company who will address the issue as appropriate This is a requirement on all staff and sub-contractors. Urgent issues include anything that could cause imminent harm. (Refer to p8 section 2 of manual – organisation). COSHH Detailed arrangements for the assessment and control of substances which may be hazardous to health are given in Chiltern Lift Co. COSHH arrangements guidance note’.
  • 28. 28 Item Action Standard Purchasing A copy of the Manufacturers Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) must be retained on any new substances purchased. Assessments Ensure that all substances which might be hazardous to health are assessed for risk and suitable controls implemented. The Quality and Safety Manager A copy of the significant findings is to be held on file and where appropriate on-site.
  • 29. 29 Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) Compliance PPE will be issued as necessary subject to a risk assessment. Record of risk assessment to be undertaken by Q&S manager and retained on file. . For Onsite workers As a minimum all staff working on site will be issued with Boots Gloves Hi-viz vest Hard hat Safety Glasses Overalls. These are to be worn while on-site. Failure to wear as required is a disciplinary matter. As necessary, harnesses, masks etc will be available. A record is to be kept of issues and maintenance measures by the Quality and Safety Manager. For temporary workers. Office workers PPE including glasses for work at display screen equipment will be issued following an assessment of requirement Glasses will be issued only on the advice of the optician if required for work at screens. : Manual Handling 1. The Quality and Safety Manager will review all work activities to identify and assess any hazardous manual handling tasks. 2. No manual handling is to be undertaken which might result in injury to a member of staff. 3. Any concerns in this area should be reported to the Quality and Safety Manager. 4. Manual handling assessments are as detailed in the Chiltern Manual Handling guidance note. Training / Supervision: 1. Detailed training arrangements are given in Chiltern Lifts Training guidance note. 2. The company will ensure that all staff are suitably trainee by identifying the necessary requirements and developing and ongoing programme on a prioritised basis. 3. The Quality and Safety manager will advise the Safety Group on training and supervision issues.
  • 30. 30 Work at height 1. Detailed arrangements for working at height is given in Chiltern Lifts guidance note on Working at Height. 2. The Health and Safety Executive report that on average 13 people a year die at work falling from ladders and nearly 1200 suffer major injuries. More than a quarter of falls happen from ladders. 3. HSE’s key message is that ladders should only be used for low-risk, short- duration work. All work at height must be assessed and ladder only used in low risk, short duration (max 15mins) work. Asbestos 1. No work is to be undertaken on asbestos. 2. Do not interfere with asbestos or an asbestos containing material 3. Prior to any work commencing – ensure that the asbestos register for the premises is checked. 4. If you suspect a material may contain asbestos ensure that you do not disturb it. If you have reason to believe that asbestos fibres may have been released, stop work. Isolate the area and report your concerns immediately to the on-site representative / manager and the main Office. 5. Asbestos is considered as part of the wider ‘Authorisation to Commence Work’ arrangements. Further information on asbestos is available from: http://www.hse.gov.uk/asbestos/index.htm Sub-Contractors 1. Sub-contracted labour will be used as necessary to ensure service commitments are maintained. 2. It is essential that any sub-contracted labour also maintains the necessary safety standards. 3. The Company will take the appropriate steps as detailed in ‘Arrangements for sub-contracted labour’ guidance to ensure that potential sub-contractors are vetted and assessed. 4. The outcome will be that the company will develop its own ‘approved list’ of tried and tested labour, suitably qualified and alert to the appropriate company standards. Welfare Provision Office Welfare Facilities The following welfare facilities are provided at Chiltern Lift Company Head Office and are available to all staff:
  • 31. 31  2 Separate toilets (gender designated) with flushing toilet and hand wash basin.  Dining area for eating.  Kitchen area for food and drinks preparation including microwave, refrigerator with freezer box compartment, kettle, fresh drinking water supply and washing up facilities.  1st floor landing toilet area to be used for the changing of clothes as and when required. Welfare Facilities for Off-Site Mobile Workers For staff that are predominantly based off-site (e.g. engineers, testers etc) the following welfare provision arrangements will be made; Project Manager or Service Manager to ensure suitable welfare facilities are provided from the start and maintained throughout the planned works. The availability of welfare facilities, their location on site and regular maintenance will be considered at the planning and preparation stages of every works project, before work starts. In such cases, it may be appropriate to make arrangements to use facilities provided by the owner of existing premises, in which the work is being done, local public facilities or the facilities of local businesses. Clear agreement will be made with the provider of the facilities. Facilities will be made readily accessible to the worksite, open at all relevant times, be at no cost to the workers, be of an acceptable standard in terms of cleanliness and have handwashing facilities. Workers will be made aware of the arrangements to use them and be informed of their location prior to the start of works. Planning for Provision of Temporary Welfare Provision Units Planning welfare provision, the following is to be considered:  the nature of the work to be carried out and the health risks associated with it. For example, consider the provision of showers if the project involves hazardous substances or very dirty work, eg dusty removal activities, work on construction sites, etc;  the distance workers will have to travel to the welfare facilities;  the duration of the work and number of different locations;  the numbers of people who will use them;  the cleaning and maintenance of the welfare facilities; Should the additional provision of welfare facilities be required (i.e. installation of portable toilets etc. when working as Principle Contractor) the adequate facilities will be put in place prior to start of works. Positioning on site Site welfare units will be positioned to manage traffic effectively and ensure adequate segregation of pedestrians and vehicles. Toilets
  • 32. 32 Flushing toilets and running water, connected to mains water and drainage systems will be provided. If this is not possible, facilities with a built-in water supply and drainage tanks will be used. Portable chemical toilets are acceptable only if it is not reasonably practicable to make other adequate provision. Toilets will be adequately ventilated, lit and maintained in a clean condition. The adequate number of toilets will be considered and provided. The number needed will depend on the number of workers on site and the type of facilities provided. BS6465–1:2006 recommends a ratio of 1 toilet to 7 persons where portable toilets are emptied once a week. Men and women may use the same toilet, if it is in a lockable room and partitioned from any urinals. Otherwise provide separate toilets. Adequate supplies of toilet paper will always be available. Sanitary waste disposal will be provided in facilities used by female workers. Washing facilities Washing facilities next to both toilets and changing areas to be provided and include:  a supply of clean hot and cold, or warm, water (which should be running water so far as is reasonably practicable);  soap or other suitable means of cleaning;  towels or other suitable means of drying;  sufficient ventilation and lighting;  sinks large enough to wash face, hands and forearms. Showers used for particularly dirty work, or when workers are exposed to especially hazardous substances (eg development of contaminated land, or demolition of old industrial buildings which are contaminated with toxic substances etc), will be provided where appropriate and be separate from the main facilities. Drinking water A supply of wholesome drinking water will be readily available. Where possible, it will be supplied direct from the mains. If water is stored, it will be protected from possible contamination and make sure it is changed often enough to prevent it from becoming stale or contaminated. The drinking water supply will be marked to prevent it being confused with hazardous liquids or water which is not fit to drink. Cups or other drinking vessels will be provided at the outlet. Changing rooms and lockers As an when required the work site will have arrangements for securely storing personal clothing not worn on site and for protective clothing needed for site work. Separate lockers will be provided, although on smaller sites the site office may be a suitable storage area provided it is kept secure. Where there is a risk of protective site clothing contaminating everyday clothing, items will be stored separately. Provision will be made to allow wet clothing to be dried. As a general rule clothing will not be placed directly on heaters due to the risk of fire. If electrical heaters are used, they will be properly ventilated and, if possible, fitted with a high temperature cut-out device. Rest facilities Rest facilities will be provided as and when required. The rest facilities will have adequate numbers of tables, seating with backs, a means for heating water for drinks
  • 33. 33 and for warming up food (eg a gas or electrical heating ring or microwave oven) and be adequately heated. Rest areas are not to be used to store plant, equipment or materials. Rest facilities will be heated using properly maintained electrical equipment. MAINTENANCE OF PLANT AND EQUIPMENT Chiltern Lifts will ensure that work equipment is maintained in an efficient state, in working order and in good repair. Where the equipment has a maintenance log this log is to be kept up to date. The Company has a statutory duty to maintain its plant and equipment and avoid risks to health and safety. The Company will use maintenance schedules to control and manage the equipment. Various maintenance programmes may be required these will need to take into account the operational needs as well as health and safety considerations and the possible impact on the environment. Also allowances must be made for the aptitude and skill of the operator. Chiltern Lifts may use:  Unscheduled or breakdown maintenance  Scheduled or routine maintenance  Planned preventive maintenance  Predictive maintenance  Improvement maintenance. The Company will provide adequate supervision that provides information and training to ensure that there is compliance with safety procedures. The Company will develop safe systems of work, which identify risks hazards and then eliminate or control the risks to a minimum. Operatives using Company Plant and Equipment will be competent and trained. They must inspect the equipment before use and must not misuse the equipment. Operatives must report all faults, damage, defects or malfunctions to their Supervisor / foreman. They must not use defective equipment. Defective equipment must be immobilised and identified as awaiting repair. PREVENTATIVE MAINTENANCE Where practicable a programme of routine preventative maintenance shall operate. The programme should be documented in adequate detail, and records kept of work carried out under the programme. Unscheduled downtime and “non-casualty” repair costs should be used to identify preventive maintenance needs. POWER TOOLS The following regulations apply to the use of electrical power tools on site or other workplaces.  The Electricity at Work Regulations 1989.  The Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992.
  • 34. 34 Guidance on the safe use of electricity on construction sites is found in the following publications.  The I.E.E. Regulations for the electrical equipment of Buildings, Section H.  The British Standard 4363 1991 - Distribution units for electricity supplies for construction and building sites.  British Standard 4363, 1991 - Industrial plugs, sockets, outlets etc. Various other British Standards apply to the type of cabling and power tools. The following Health and Safety Executive Guidance Notes will be complied with where applicable; Copies of the relevant regulations will be kept at Head Office for reference. The site supervisor will ensure that all portable electrical tools and equipment is maintained and tested as per the required periods. Only authorised persons shall be permitted to repair or alter electrical equipment. Any defects noted in electrical equipment must be reported to supervisor so that immediate steps can be taken to have defects remedied by an approved contractor or to have equipment to be replaced. PAT TESTING All electric appliances such as hand drills, hand saws, angle grinders etc are to be tested in accordance with Regulation 16 of the Electricity at Work Regulations. These tests apply to all electrical appliances used by the company and will be carried out annually. Users of equipment are to be aware of the need to only use equipment that is safe so far as they are aware. Carry out informal visual inspections for obvious faults at all times and report faults that are found to their supervisor immediately. Formal visual inspections are to be carried out by a competent person annually and the results recorded. Combined inspection and testing to be carried out by a competent person at appropriate intervals and the results recorded. Instrument testing Class 1: Equipment that relies on a connection to the earthing system of the fixed wiring installation. The cord or flex will have an earth wire (coloured green and yellow) as well as a phase (coloured brown) and a neutral (coloured blue). Class 1 equipment requires Earth Bond Continuity and Insulation Resistance tests to be carried out. Class 2: Equipment has an extra layer of insulation to protect the user from electric shock, does not require a connection with the earthing system so will not have an earth wire (coloured yellow and green). Class 2 equipment requires Insulation Resistance test only. Class 3: Equipment that uses low voltage (less than 50V) supplied from a specialised transformer. The transformer itself and the lead connecting it to the fixed wiring supply may be either class 1 or class 2. NOTE THAT THE CODE OF PRACTICE IS FOR ALL ELECTRICAL EQUIPMENT NOT JUST PORTABLE EQUIPMENT OR 'ANYTHING WITH A PLUG.'
  • 35. 35 Electrical Work and Safe Isolation Procedures It is essential from the outset that effective management and control of the electrical system, apparatus and equipment used on site is achieved and maintained, thereby ensuring that the hazards and risks which can arise are minimised. An authorised person (site supervisor) will be appointed, with responsibility for the supervision of the installation of switchgear, equipment, cables, jointing, etc. throughout any work project. The site supervisor will have responsibility for the safe working practices of the operatives, as well the control of appointed sub-contractors; sub- contractors must provide appropriate method statements and risk assessments for their works prior to start of works. Once machine-rooms and work areas are made available by the main contractor for works to proceed, and before installation of any equipment commences, it should be ensured that a suitable door is fitted to the machine-room and that heavy duty locks, or padlocks, and keys are provided. Also ensure that access doors are locked when not working in these areas. Plant and materials should not be stored in the machine-rooms. Always try to avoid energising any outgoing electrical distribution services until the distribution switchgear and all connected circuits are complete and have been inspected and tested. Once distribution services are energised, where necessary implement the safe isolation procedures explained in the rest of these procedures. Before energising any final circuit (i.e. lighting, power, etc.) it should be checked that the wiring system within the area has been completed and equipment, including luminaries and accessories, fitted. This check should ensure that earthing arrangements and protective conductors including equipotential bonding are in place, and that the final circuit is tested as far as possible. If the service in question is energised for the testing and commissioning of equipment/system, it must be switched OFF and locked upon completion of this work, unless stated otherwise on the written job instruction and agreed with the site supervisor. When live services are provided prior to final commissioning, warning signs should be displayed on each item of live switchgear, plant and along cable routes that pass through the work areas in exposed positions. This is particularly important where switchgear and cables are exposed to damage that may be caused by other trades or the environmental conditions. For work on LV electrical equipment or circuits, it is important to ensure that the correct point of isolation is identified, an appropriate means of isolation is used and the supply cannot inadvertently be reinstated while the work is in progress. Caution notices should also be applied at the point(s) of isolation, and the conductors must be proved to be dead at the point of work before they are touched. A fundamental principle is that the point of isolation should be under the control of the person who is carrying out the work on the isolated conductors. The means of isolation can be an adjacent local isolation device such as a plug and socket, switch-disconnector, circuit breaker, fuse etc, as appropriate, which is under the direct control of the competent person carrying out the work. These devices can be used without further precautions provided there is no foreseeable risk that the supply could be reinstated by others.
  • 36. 36 When there is no such local means of isolation or there is a risk of reinstatement of the supply as above, the circuit or equipment to be worked on should be securely isolated by one of the following methods;  Isolation using a main switch or distribution board (DB) switch-disconnector  Isolation of equipment or circuits using the main switch or DB switch- disconnector is the preferred method. The point of isolation should be locked off using a unique key or combination retained by the person carrying out the work. In the case of multiple isolations on a DB, a multi-lock hasp can be used to prevent access to a main isolator until such time that all persons working on a system have completed their work and removed their padlocks from the hasp.  If locking-off facilities are not provided on the relevant switch then a locked DB door or locked switch-room door is acceptable provided the key or combination is unique, and is retained by the person doing the work. Again, multi-lock hasps can be used to control multiple isolations, although a key box or similar system may be needed to retain and control access to the main door key. Where it is intended that more than one person will be working on circuits supplied from a DB, (i.e. multiple isolations) and a multi-lock hasp cannot be used to secure the main point of isolation, individual isolation of each circuit by one or more of the methods shown below is recommended, to prevent inadvertent reinstatement of the supply. The principle is that each person carrying out such work should have control of their own point(s) of isolation and not rely on others to prevent inadvertent energisation. Isolation of individual circuits Where it is not practical to isolate a distribution board, individual circuits supplied from it can be isolated by one of the methods described below, depending on the type of protective device used. However, bear in mind the overriding advice to avoid energising any outgoing electrical distribution services, preferably until the distribution switchgear and all connected circuits are complete and have been inspected and the relevant tests carried out. If any items required to carry out the procedures recommended below are not manufactured for the DB in question or cannot be obtained through retail/trade outlets, it is acceptable to disconnect the circuit from the DB as long as the disconnected tails are made safe by being coiled or insulated. Suitable labelling of the disconnected conductors is important to prevent the supply being re-instated, particularly if other electricians are present. It should be remembered that work carried out inside a live DB is regarded as live working when there is access to exposed live conductors. In this case the appropriate precautions should be taken as described in HSG85 with respect to Regulation 14 of the Electricity at Work Regulations. i. Isolation of individual circuits protected by circuit breakers Where circuit breakers are used the relevant device should be locked-off using an appropriate locking-off clip with a padlock which can only be opened by a unique key or combination. The key or combination should be retained by the person carrying out the work. Note: Some DBs are manufactured with ‘Slider Switches’ to disconnect the circuit from the live side of the circuit breaker. These devices should not be relied upon as the only means of isolation for circuits as the wrong switch could easily be operated on completion of the work. ii. Isolation of individual circuits protected by fuses
  • 37. 37 Where fuses are used, the simple removal of the fuse is an acceptable means of disconnection. Where removal of the fuse exposes live terminals that can be touched, the incoming supply to the fuse will need to be isolated. To prevent the fuse being replaced by others, the fuse should be retained by the person carrying out the work, and a lockable fuse insert with a padlock should be fitted as above. A caution notice should also be used to deter inadvertent replacement of a spare fuse. In addition, it is recommended that the enclosure is locked to prevent access as stated above under ‘Isolation using a main switch or distribution board (DB) switch-disconnector’. Note: In TT systems, the incoming neutral conductor cannot reliably be regarded as being at earth potential. This means that for TT supplies, a multi- pole switching device which disconnects the phase and neutral conductors must be used as the means of isolation. For similar reasons, in IT systems all poles of the supply must be disconnected. Single pole isolation in these circumstances is not acceptable. Caution Notices Following isolation of equipment or circuits and before starting work it should be proved that the parts to be worked on and those nearby, are dead. It should never be assumed that equipment is dead because a particular isolation device has been placed in the off position. The procedure for proving dead should be by use of a proprietary test lamp or two pole voltage detector as recommended in HSE Guidance Note GS38, Electrical test equipment for use by electricians. Non-contact voltage indicators (voltage sticks) and multi-meters should not be used. The test instrument should be proved to be working on a known live source or proprietary proving unit before and after use. All phases of the supply and the neutral should be tested and proved dead. New installations New installations can be a particular hazard as some of the circuits or equipment may require to be modified after the installation has been energised. It is therefore important that every protective device is correctly identified at each distribution board before any energising takes place, and safe isolation procedures, such as locking-off circuit breakers as described above, are adopted, particularly where a number of electricians are working on the same installation. The practice of placing PVC insulating tape over a circuit breaker to prevent inadvertent switch-on is not a safe means of isolation. Neutral conductors Care should be taken when working on neutral conductors of circuits. The practice of ‘borrowing’ neutrals, i.e. making use of the neutral of one circuit for use on another circuit, is not permitted by BS 7671. This dangerous practice, however, is not uncommon. Lighting and control circuits are the most common examples where this practice is found. In these circumstances the neutral conductor can become live when the conductor is disconnected, if a load is connected to that circuit. It is also difficult to identify specific neutral conductors in ‘bunches’ of single core cables, e.g. where enclosed in trunking or conduit, and care should be taken when severing such cables that the correct
  • 38. 38 conductor has been identified. If doubt exists, live working measures, such as the use of eye protection, electricians insulating gloves, insulated tools etc, should be employed until the circuit has been proved dead. Proving dead unused or unidentified cables Where there is uncertainty regarding isolation when removing unidentified cables or proving dead an ‘unused’ cable, particularly where insufficient conductor is exposed to enable the use of test probes, those conductors should be assumed to be live until positively proven to be dead and any work carried out on them should employ live working practices until the conductors are proved dead. Clamp meters can be used as a means of identifying cables by testing for current flow in the conductors. Non-contact voltage indicators (voltage sticks) can also be useful in these situations to test for voltage where cables without a metallic sheath are to be identified. However, once insulation is pared using live working practices to reveal the underlying conductors, contact voltage detectors should be used as the means of proving dead. Additional Precautions Manager and supervisors must ensure that all employees involved in work on electrical equipment are competent and are instructed on safe systems of work, have been issued with written rules and instructions, and have access to, and use, appropriate locking-off devices, caution notices, a proprietary voltage detector and, where appropriate for the type of voltage detector being used, a proving unit. Consultation As a small company consultation is largely conducted on an informal basis and we value this important aspect of communication. Where there is likely to be a significant change in working practices affecting the Health & Safety of staff, the Safety Group will consult more formally as appropriate. This may be by emailing or by asking for input from staff, or an invitation to attend at the Safety Management Group meeting (held every 12 weeks) The Safety Management Group meeting will be the forum covering:  New systems of work  New technology  Appointment of external contractors  Environmental issues  Risk control systems  Compliance issues  Health & Safety training  Purchasing and any other topic affecting health safety or the environment. Suggestions from staff on Health, Safety and Environmental matters are valued and may be made formally or informally to any manager or director. The hazard report form may be used (below). Staff are encouraged to report any H&S concerns they have. If there is a specific issue which a member of staff believes should be addressed it should be raised in the first instance with their supervisor / manager, and / or discussed with the company Quality & Safety Manager.
  • 39. 39 Statutory Notices In accordance with the provisions of the Health & Safety (Consultation with Employees) Regulations 1996, a poster informing employees in general terms about the requirements of Health & Safety law is displayed in the main company office on the notice display board. This information will be issued in leaflet form for employees who work away from the premises. Employees are required read the information contained in the poster or leaflet carefully, as it describes the key points of the duties of the employer and employee respectively under the laws relating to Health & Safety. Employees will be expected to sign a register accepting that this information has been made readily available and if necessary explained to them. Information is also provided on the local addresses of the enforcing authority for Health & Safety law. The Local Authority Environmental Health Department is to be found at: Environmental Health Department Buckinghamshire County Council Civic Centre Walton Street Tel: 01296 395000 Aylesbury HP20 1UX www.buckscc.gov.uk The Employment Medical Advisory Service (EMAS) can be contacted at: European Medical Advisory Service (EMAS) 109 Bancroft Tel: Hitchin www.emas-medical.com Herts SG5 1NB
  • 40. 40 Chiltern Hazard Report form. To: c.c. Date From: I have reason to believe that the following condition below could cause injury, damage or have an adverse effect on someone’s health Where is the hazard? What is the issue of concern? Building Floor Room/Area Identify the hazard – tick the appropriate box(es) below: Asbestos Burns / Scalds Chemicals Dust / Fumes Electrical Fire Fall From Height Handling Lighting Machinery Obstruction Proximity Sharps (needles / glass) Struck by something Space Tripping / Slipping Ventilation Vehicles Other: Briefly describe the Hazard / Issue – continue on separate sheet if required. Indicate the level of risk associated with this hazard: High  Medium  Low  Manager’s Response: I have investigated the above circumstances. Risk control measures are adequate/inadequate (delete as necessary). The following action will be implemented within ……. Day(s) / Week(s):
  • 41. 41 Arrangements for general work on site. General Procedure: Depending on nature of the contract preliminary information about the job may already have been made available e.g. access to site, or the method statement may have been developed from a previous scoping visit for assessment purposes. It it important to ensure clear communications with the site / project prior to work commencing and not undertake any work until all are agreed on a safe working method. In general the following procedure should be carefully gone through. Action Standard Who 1 Check owners responsibilities See list below 2 Complete lift risk assessment and amend as appropriate See Lift risk assessment below 3 Check H&S file where it exists 4 Confirm no asbestos. Use the ‘Authorisation To Commence Work’ form - below 5 Confirm electrical safety As above 6 Confirm safe working arrangement – permits as required As above 7 Agree safe system with client / representive As above 8 Complete ‘Authorisation to Commence Work’ form. As above 9 Commence work 10 Finish work – Report to site manager and update 11 Update log & site report 12 Leave site. .
  • 42. 42 Owner Responsibilties. The company should ensure that in all instances the Owners or site Responsible Person(s) are clear on their duties as outlined in: BS7255:2001 section 4 1 and adequately discharge these responsibilities. As a minimum this should cover: o Responsibilities for work on site o Liaison / communications o Personal Protective Equipment o Access to electrical supplies o The display of Safety Signs o Housekeeping arrangements o Access to safety file o Effects on premises occupants o Access to tools, equipment and materials. o Permit to Work system o Installation, major repair and dismantling safety. o Access / Egress issues –including pit access, landings and machinery spaces and the integral safe condition of each of these areas. o Lighting o Safe workplaces (i.e. the premises or part of premises where work is carried out). o Access to machinery spaces o Risk assessment of the works o Lone Working arrangements o Safe system for working in the well o Ensure car top signs as applicable. o Means for safe release of trapped passengers. 1 ). Safety management: Responsibilities of owners,
  • 43. 43 Responsibility for work on site Control: The Engineer or other suitably qualified person will be responsible for all work on the site relating to the lift installation, and should be fully aware of his duties. The Engineer in charge must ascertain who is acting on behalf of the Owner in order that they can report the start, progress and completion of the work. Competence: Any work carried out on lifts will be performed only by authorized persons, supervised and instructed on the work and on how it is to be carried out safely. In general a written safe systems of work which might already be included in prior contract information will be followed. Risk assessments will be completed to ensure the safety of other persons who could be at risk even if they are not involved in the actual work being undertaken on a lift, e.g. persons intending to travel in the lift. Communication: The engineer or other persons authorized to carry out work on a lift installation must advise the owner of risks that could arise as a result of the work and agree with them a safe system of working. Liaison Before starting work or taking a lift out of service, the engineer will advise the owner's site representative of the intention to do so by completing the Authorisation to Commence work form. (below). Risk assessment If not already done prior to work commencing onsite, the engineer must undertake a risk assessment together with the owner, to establish safety measures to ensure the safety of persons engaged in undertaking the work and persons using the lifts. (see forms in Appendix 1 and 2).
  • 44. 44 The Engineer is to agree any special precautions or procedures need to be taken in regard to:  Emergencies (first aid / fire / other foreseeable )  Personal protective equipment Personal protective equipment is to be provided as identified by risk assessment. Head protection, gloves, eye protection, hearing protection, respirators, face-masks, safety harnesses etc. should be provided, and used as required. Such equipment should be maintained in a serviceable condition and replaced as necessary.  Electrical equipment The lift contractor is to use only the electrical supplies provided by the owner. Work must not be carried out on or near to live electrical equipment, unless working in this way is unavoidable. In such instances, work should be carried out only by an authorized person, implementing a safe system of work that has been established by a risk assessment.2 NB. The integrity of the electrical supply is solely the responsibility of the owner.  Arrangements for removal of lift from service must be agreed with the site representative / manager.  Housekeeping Personnel must ensure high standards of housekeeping at all times in particular: a) the avoidance of build-up of waste materials in wells; b) the control and safe disposal of waste and other items and substances that are potentially injurious to health and safety.  Safety file Prior to any significant works (other than very minor works) the on-site safety file is to be consulted. A Safety file is required under the CDM regulations, following the initial installation of a lift. It must be made available to the owner. The file should indicate: a) the major aspects of the installation process; b) servicing and maintenance requirements; c) any special operations where a particular method needs to be adopted; d) specific instructions for the dismantling and disposal of the lift at the end of its working life. (NB: The technical dossier described in BS EN 81-1 and BS EN 81-2 could be used to form the basis of the safety file.) 2 On multiple installations an electrical hazard can exist. Although an individual lift may be electrically isolated, it is possible for electrical power to be supplied from a common/shared control panel.
  • 45. 45  Effects on the occupants Potential disruption, arising from the lift works, to the occupants of the premises should be assessed and minimized.  Access to tools, equipment and materials Arrangements should be made between the lift contractor and the owner for: a) safe access to all tools, equipment and materials at workplaces; b) the provision of suitable and clearly identified storage space for tools, equipment, materials and any portable access equipment; c) the provision of alternative access routes as may become necessary during the works being undertaken.  Permits to work Where appropriate, the engineer should obtain a permit to work from the owner. Installation, major repair and dismantling Where installation, major repair or dismantling is taking place, the procedures given in Annex E of BS7255:2001 are to be implemented in addition to standard safe working procedures.  Lone working A permit to work system is to implemented for lone working. This includes remote machinery spaces, pulley rooms or pits. It is essential that when an authorized person is working alone the following procedures and provisions are adopted: a) before commencing work, the authorized person should register their presence with the owner's site representative. b) suitable arrangements should be made to ensure that the continued well-being of the authorized person is confirmed periodically at intervals as identified by risk assessment; c) any persons checking the well-being of authorized persons working alone should have knowledge of how to organize assistance in the event of an emergency;
  • 46. 46 d) the specific arrangements and frequency for confirming the well-being of the authorized person should be described in the relevant safe working procedure; e) the authorized person working alone should inform a responsible person off-site of their proposed movements during this period. NOTE: These procedures are particularly important if an authorized person is working alone in unoccupied premises.  Working within the well All persons working within a well should abide by all relevant safety signs. Where required, barriers should be erected in front of the landing doors3. Landing doors should not be allowed to remain open any longer than is necessary. Prior to any landing door being opened, it must be decided whether the work to be carried out requires the electrical power supply to be maintained. If not, the main switch should be locked in the "off' position. Should the electrical supply need to be maintained, the normal lift control circuit should be isolated. Safe means of egress should be clearly established before entering the well. The safe means of egress should exist during all phases of a work activity and should be readily accessible from the workplace. Unauthorized persons should be prevented from entering the machinery space whilst persons are working within the well. The number of persons working within a well at the same time should be kept to a minimum. If possible, the simultaneous employment of different tradespersons working independently of each other should be avoided. A permit to work system should be put in place where simultaneous employment of different trades is unavoidable. A safe system of work should be put in place, and a risk assessment should be carried out, to identify whether a permit to work system is necessary. 3 The barriers should have been provided by the owner.
  • 47. 47 A lift should not be returned to normal operation after completion of work, until it has been ascertained that no persons, tools, temporary access equipment, etc., remain within the well. Any equipment, e.g. a propping device, should be replaced in its proper storage position.  Working on the car top The risk assessment should indicate if be work is being undertaken from the car top and how the risks will be minimised. Where full (car) control is not provided and the car top is to be used and moved as a work platform, the safe system of work must be agreed between the lift contractor and the owner. The recommendations contained within the Safety Assessment Federation Limited (SAFed) document, Recommendations - Safe working on lifts - Car top controls, should be implemented. Working on a car top can be extremely dangerous and in recent years a number of industry fatalities have resulted from inadequate provisions. It is extremely hazardous when working without full control being available to the person riding on the car. Whenever the car is stationary the stopping device should be operated. NB Persons working on the top of a car are at particular risk when they are unprepared for the lift to be set in motion. Examples of accidents associated with moving cars have been due either to falling or to bodily contact with the well structure and/or equipment. The correct operation of the car top control station functions should be verified before the car top is accessed or any work activity commenced. The number of persons travelling on the top of a car at anyone time should be kept to a minimum. One person only should be in sole control of the starting and stopping of the car. NOTE: The procedures adopted for moving the car are of prime importance, and it is essential that all persons working on a car top are aware of when and how the car is to be moved. Where there is a risk of a person working on a car top becoming trapped and where no means are provided for escape via either the car or the well, an alarm or voice communication system is to be used.
  • 48. 48 Where the safety sign indicates a possibility of free fall a safety harness must be worn. Suitable training, information and instructions should be given and extreme care should be exercised in its use when movement of the lift is necessary.  Working in the pit Lifts should always be moved at inspection speed whilst persons are in the pit. A person entering a pit should first confirm the effectiveness of any stopping device installed. If there is no stopping device installed, the main power supply should be isolated and locked off. (A permit system must ensure the power cannot be restored except by authorised persons) NOTE Keeping the car and/or landing doors open in order to interrupt the normal control circuit is not on its own an adequate means of preventing car movement because landing doors can be self-closing. On older installations the stopping device can be of the toggle type and subject to unintentional operation. When work is being carried out in the pit, a device should be fitted in place from within the well, if necessary, to restrain a sliding landing door. This device should retain the door within 75 mm of its closed position so that the door cannot easily be pulled open from the landing side. Such devices provide additional security for persons working within the pit and prevent persons outside the well from opening the landing doors. Where a counterweight screen has not been provided or has been removed, a safe system of work should be implemented. If delegated to do so by the owner, the lift contractor should display a safety sign in a prominent position. If a mechanical restraint is provided, it should be correctly positioned before access is gained to the space beneath the car. If the car is to be moved whilst authorized persons are in the well, the restraint should be retained in its operative position. The owner should provide a mechanical restraint for electric lifts where the space below the car is restricted, and for all hydraulic lifts.  Landing entrances The unlocking and opening of a landing door or gate, when the car is not positioned at a landing, should be undertaken only when necessary and then only by an authorized person.
  • 49. 49 Any unlocking device should be kept in a safe and secure place. If an unlocking device is not provided, a safe system of work must take this into account. On completion of the work, it should be verified that the landing door is closed and locked. A landing door or gate should not be allowed to remain open any longer than is necessary. If a landing door is to be left unlocked and open for any length of time, a barrier should be erected to protect the open landing entrance.  Machinery spaces and pulley rooms All persons working within a machinery space or pulley room should abide by all relevant safety signs. Other than when work activities are being carried out within a machinery space/pulley room, the entrance door(s) to the room(s) should be kept locked to prevent unauthorized access. On multiple installations, a thorough check should be made before commencing work to establish the correct relationship between a specific lift and its corresponding well and associated equipment. To facilitate this check, the owner should take steps to ensure that each lift and component part thereof is clearly and uniquely identified, both at or adjacent to the lowest and highest landing entrances, and within the machinery space A risk assessment should be undertaken to establish safe working procedures where machinery is in motion or capable of motion. All permanently installed lifting equipment provided in machinery spaces or pulley rooms should be used only within its safe working load.  Safe release of trapped passengers NOTE: Safe release procedures differ for different types of lift passenger release, e.g. traction lifts, drum/chain lifts, hydraulic lifts, geared or gearless lifts. The general procedures given in are applicable for all types of lift. General Only trained and authorized persons should undertake the safe release of trapped passengers. NOTE: It is important that the release of passengers is carried out only by authorized persons who have received the necessary training, because it is dangerous for any other persons to attempt to do so. A
  • 50. 50 failure to take adequate precautions may render the authorized person concerned guilty of negligence should an accident occur. If contracted to do so, the lift contractor should send to the site the requisite number of trained persons to carry out the safe release of trapped passengers. All release operations to be adopted should be carried out according to the manufacturer's or other authorized instructions for the lift concerned, as permanently displayed in the form of a notice in the machinery space. An appropriate means should be implemented by which all persons effecting the release of trapped passengers are able to communicate with one another. To assist the safe release of passengers trapped in a car, an authorized person should be stationed at the nearest available landing entrance. This person should be in direct communication with those in the machinery space and the passengers in the car, and should continually reassure the passengers and ensure that passengers do not attempt to leave the car prematurely. It is imperative that trapped passengers should be warned of the intention to move the car and that they should not attempt to leave it until they are advised that it is safe to do so. Before commencing the safe release procedures, it is vital that the electrical supply should be isolated; if lock -off facilities exist, they should be used. Specific safety procedures for Electric traction lifts and Hydraulic lifts must be followed as appropriate.
  • 51. 51 DRAFT Lift Risk Assessment Form
  • 52. 52 Risk assessment for work on lifts: (Refer to BS EN 81-80:2003 (Safety rules for the construction and installation of lifts. Existing lifts. Rules for the improvement of safety of existing passenger and goods passenger lifts)) Nr. HazardlHazardous situation Hazard HML EN:81-80 Suitably Controlled Additional measured required Residual Risk Rating HML 1 Presence of harmful materials H 5.1.4 2 No or limited accessibility for disabled persons L 5.2.1 3 Drive system with bad stopping levelling accuracy H 5.2.2 4 No or inadequate vandal resistance M 5.3 5 No or inadequate control functions in case of fire H 5.4 6 Well enclosures with perforate walls H 5.5.1.1 7 Partially enclosed well with too low enclosure H 5.5.1.2 8 Inadequate locking devices on access doors to well and pit H 5.5.2 9 Inadequate vertical surface below landing door sills H 5.5.3 10 Counterweight/balancing weight without safety gear in case of L 5.5.4 accessible spaces below well 11 No or inadequate partition of counterweight/ balancing weight L 5.5.5 travel path 12 No or inadequate pit screen for several lifts in the same well H 5.5.6.1 13 No or inadequate partition for several lifts in the same well H 5.5.6.2 14 Insufficient safety spaces in headroom and pit H 5.5.7 15 Unsafe pit access H 5.5.8 16 No or inadequate stopping devices in the pit or in the pulley room H 5.5.9 17 No or inadequate lighting of the well H 5.5.10
  • 53. 53 Nr. HazardlHazardous situation Hazard HML EN:81-80 Suitably Controlled Additional measured required Residual Risk Rating HML 18 No alarm system in pit and on car roof M 5.5.11 19 No or unsafe means of access to machine and pulley room H 5.6.1 20 Slippery floor in machine or pulley room L 5.6.2 21 Insufficient clearances in machine room M 5.6.3 22 No or inadequate protection on different levels in machine pulley H 5.6.4 room H 23 Inadequate lighting in machine or pulley room H 5.6.5 24 Inadequate means of handling equipment M 5.6.6 25 Perforate landing doors and car doors H 5.7.1 26 Inadequate design of landing door fixings H 5.7.2 27 Inadequate glass in doors H 5.7.3 28 No or inadequate protection against dragging of fingers on sliding L 5.7.4 car or landing doors with glass 29 No or inadequate lighting on landing doors M 5.7.5 30 No or inadequate protective devices on power operated doors H 5.7.6 31 Unsafe locking device of landing door H 5.7.7 32 Unlocking of landing door without a special tool H 5.7.8.1 33 Well enclosure with perforate walls near door locks H 5.7.8.2 34 No automatic closing device on sliding doors H 5.7.9 35 Inadequate link between panels of landing doors M 5.7.10 36 Inadequate fire resistance of landing doors M 5.7.11 37 Car door moving with open landing door M 5.7.12
  • 54. 54 Nr. HazardlHazardous situation Hazard HML EN:81-80 Suitably Controlled Additional measured required Residual Risk Rating HML 38 Large car area in relation to rated load L 5.8.1 39 Inadequate length of car apron H 5.8.2 40 Car without doors H 5.8.3 41 Unsafe locking of car roof trap door M 5.8.4 42 Insufficient strength of car roof L 5.8.5 43 No or inadequate balustrade on car H 5.8.6 44 Insufficient ventilation in car M 5.8.7 45 Inadequate lighting in car M 5.8.8.1 46 No or inadequate emergency lighting in car M 5.8.8.2 47 No or inadequate protection means on sheaves,pulleys and sprockets against injury M 5.9.1 48 No or inadequate protection against rope/chains leaving the sheaves, pulleys or sprockets M 5.9.1 49 No or inadequate protection means on sheaves, pulleys or sprockets against introduction of objects L 5.9.1 50 No or inadequate safety gear and/or overspeed governor on electric lifts H 5.9.2 51 No or inadequate slack rope switch for governor rope M 5.9.3 52 No protection means against ascending car overspeed on traction drive lifts with counterweight H 5.9.4 53 Inadequate design of lift machine for electric lifts H 5.9.4, 5.12.1 54 No or inadequate protection against free fall,overspeed and creeping on hydraulic lifts H 5.9.5 55 Counterweight or balancing weight guided by 2 wire ropes L 5.10.1
  • 55. 55 56 No or inadequate buffers H 5.10.2 Nr. HazardlHazardous situation Hazard HML EN:81-80 Suitably Controlled Additional measured required Residual Risk Rating HML 57 No or inadequate final limit switches L 5.10.3 58 Large gap between car and wall facing the car entrance H 5.11.1 59 Excessive distance between car door and landing door H 5.11.2 60 No or inadequate emergency operation system H 5.12.2 61 No shut-off valve L 5.12.3 62 No independent starting contactors H 5.12.4 63 No or inadequate slack rope/chain device M 5.12.5 64 No run-time limiter L 5.12.6 65 No or inadequate low pressure device M 5.12.7 66 Insufficient protection against electric shock and/or marking of electrical equipment; missing notices H 5.13.1 67 No or inadequate protection on lift machine motor L 5.13.2 68 No lockable main switch M 5.13.3 69 No protection against phase reversal L 5.14.1 70 No or inadequate inspection control station and stopping device on car roof H 5.14.2 71 No or inadequate alarm device H 5.14.3 72 No or inadequate communication system between machine room and car (travel height> 30 m) M 5.14.4 73 No or inadequate load control on car L 5.14.5 74 Missing notices, markings and operating instructions M 5.15
  • 56. 56 A Confirm no asbestos B Check H&S file where it exists C Confirm electrical safety D Confirm safe working arrangement – permits as required – give details below. E Ageed system with client / representive F On completion: work – update log / report book. Report to client and update. G Are any other persons affected by this work? Additional Comments: Permits required: Y / N If Y – which: Date of R/A Work is complete Work can commence Signature Contractor Contractor Time: Y / N Signature Client Client
  • 57. 57 CHILTERN LIFT COMPANY: Authorisation To Commence Work Do not commence work without authorisation from the site manager / representative Briefly describe the Job: Todays date Manager’s Name Company Basic Risk Assessment – Indicate which hazards are ( Low / Med / High) State control measures required. (attach sheet if necessary) Building Managers Authorisation: Asbestos Electricity Heights Slips /Trips Job may commence From : To:  Fire Procedure is agreed  First Aid is agreed  Waste disposal  Risks to others  Asbestos register checked  Other – state: Lone Working Fire Fumes Noise Car Movement Tools Manual Handling Guarding Chemical Access – car top / machine room Other – state Initials Engineer’s Signature --------------------------------------------------------------------- Continuation: The assessment is still relevant as at the date given below: Date Initials Date Initials Date Initials Date Initials Date Initials
  • 58. 58 IF YOU ARE ASKED TO CARRY OUT A RISK ASSESSMENT ON SITE FOR A PARTICULAR ACTIVITY THE FOLLOWING MAY BE OF HELP 1. Analyse the Task or Process: What has to be done? Where will it be done? Who will do the work? 2. Identify the Hazards: Not only in the work activity but are there hazardous because of where the work is being carried out etc? Use the standard 74 point check list. Consider any other factors that may apply. 3. Identify Those at Risk: Colleagues ? Customers ? Other trades? The general public? 4. Assess the Risk: How likely is it to happen? How severe the outcomes if it did. 5. Introduce Control Measures: How can you minimise the risk? Does the work have to be done at all? Is there a less hazardous way? 7. Record: Write down the significant factors of the assessment. 8. Provide Information and Training: All those involved or affected should be made aware of any necessary precautions. 9. Be aware of changes in working conditions Any change may warrant a fresh risk assessment and method statement. 10. Monitor: Constantly check that all is well Enter any additional control measures here:
  • 59. 59 CHILTERN LIFT CO. HEALTH AND SAFETY POLICY MANUAL HANDLING
  • 60. 60 Definitions Manual handling operations means any transporting or supporting of a load including lifting, putting down, pushing, pulling, carrying or moving by hand or bodily force. Injury in relation to manual handling does not include injury caused by any toxic or corrosive substance which has leaked or spilled or contaminates the surface of the load. A significant operation is a manual handling operation which in the preliminary judgement of a supervisor or an assessor might be a hazardous operation and therefore requires a formal assessment to be carried out. A hazardous operation is a manual handling operation which assessment shows to have the potential to cause injury. A manual handling assessor is a person trained to carry out assessments. See Fig. 1 Manual Handling Guidelines. Relevant Legislation Manual Handling Operations Regulations 1992 Additional Information HSE booklet L23 'Manual Handling: Guidance on Regulations' HSE publication 'Getting to Grips with Manual Handling' HSE’s Manual Handling Assessment Charts (cf. http://.www.hse.gov.uk) Cf. also 'http://www.hse.gov.uk/pubns/manlinde.htm'
  • 61. 61 Manual Handling GENERALLY. Manual Handling is a serious issue in the workplace. Even simple lifting and moving tasks, done badly and repeated often, can lead to strain injuries which affect both working and personal life. By ensuring that the correct methods are used in lifting and handling a great deal of lost time and personal suffering can be avoided. The following strategy is suggested. Manual Handling Assessor / Coordinator. The Company has appointed a manual handling coordinator. This person is responsible for ensuring that all significant m/h tasks are identified, assessed and suitably controlled. Manual Handling Co-ordinator is: Alan Ringer Identify all Manual Handling tasks All manual handling tasks must then be identified and preferably written down. By following the flow chart (see below), and considering in particular Fig 1 – it will be possible to identify those tasks that need only a simple assessment. For very serious tasks a detailed risk assessment (appendix 2) is required – if they cannot be avoided. Eliminate or Mechanise. A key exercise is to look carefully at the workplace and see what frequent tasks can be mechanised, or avoided all together. Assess and record as appropriate. Should you find that there are several tasks which need assessing, it is important that these assessments are recorded and that the people concerned are made aware of the outcome. They must have sufficient information and training. A copy of the assessments should be kept in a generally accessible H&S file. Review If there are new tasks which occur, or significant changes in working practices, the assessments should be reviewed and altered accordingly. Manual handling risk assessments, training in manual handling and any recorded injuries should be considered at the local safety committee as often as is necessary. INITIAL ASSESSMENT Use the flow chart to see if there’s a need for a more formal assessment on the tasks identified on the previous page.
  • 62. 62 Fig. 1 Manual Handling Operations GUIDELINE FIGURES – These figures illustrate the maximum loads to be handled at the different arm positions. Is there a risk of injury from manual handling? (cf. fig 1) No Can manual handling be avoided? Can the task be mechanised or redesigned to reduce the risk to an insignificant level? Carry out a risk assessment Formal risk assessment not necessary but review if conditions change significantly. Yes No No Yes Yes
  • 63. 63 NB. Maximum when seated: 3 Kg (women), 5 Kg (men)
  • 64. 64 Assessment form Risk Assessment Checklist Section A - Preliminary: * Circle as appropriate Job Description: Is an assessment needed? (i.e. is there a potential risk for injury and are the factors beyond the limits of the guidelines? Yes/No* If 'Yes' continue. If 'No' the assessment need go no further. Operations covered by this assessment (detailed description): Locations: Personnel involved: Date of assessment: Diagrams (other information): Section B - See over for detailed analysis Section C - Overall assessment of the risk of injury? Low / Med / High* Section D - Remedial action to be taken: Remedial steps that should be taken, in order of priority: 1 2 3 4 5 Date by which action should be taken: Date for reassessment: Assessor's name: Signature: TAKE ACTION ... AND CHECK THAT IT HAS THE DESIRED EFFECT
  • 65. 65 Section B - More detailed assessment, where necessary: Questions to consider: If yes, tick appropriate level of risk. Problems occurring from the task. (Make rough notes in this column in preparation for the possible remedial action to be taken) Possible remedial action. (Possible changes to be made to system/task, load, workplace/ space, environment. Communication that is needed) Low Med High The tasks - do they involve:  holding loads away from trunk?  twisting?  stooping?  reaching upwards?  large vertical movement (from floor level)?  long carrying distances (over 10 metres)?  strenuous pushing or pulling?  repetitive handing (over 30 times an hour)?  prolonged physical effort (more than one hour)?  insufficient rest or recovery?  insufficient assistance (team handling required)?  a rate imposed by a process? The loads - are they:  heavy?  bulky/unwieldy?  difficult to grasp?  unstable/unpredictable (inc. contents)?  intrinsically harmful (e.g. sharp/ hot)?  lacking adequate handles, etc. or difficult to grip?  difficult to see round or over?  needing sealed lids or closures?  containing dangerous/fragile/caustic materials? The working environment - are there:  constraints on posture?  poor floors?  variations in levels?  hot/cold/humid conditions?  strong air movements/adverse weather conditions?  poor lighting conditions?  difficulties with storage (too high, too low, awkward access)?  obstructions to movement and handling? Individual capability - does the job:  require unusual capability?  hazard those with a health problem?  hazard those who are pregnant?  call for special information/training? Other factors: Is movement or posture hindered by clothing or personal protective equipment? No. in each category: Risk factor multiplier Column Scores x 1 x 2 x 3 Total Score = Risk Category = RULES FOR PERSONS INVOLVED IN MANUAL HANDLING LOW = 20 MED = 21-29 HIGH = 30+
  • 66. 66 Examine the load to be moved for hazards and study how best to tackle the problem. This will mean giving consideration to the height, shape, and position of the load. Follow the appropriate safe system of work in which you have been trained for the handling of loads and use kinetic handling techniques where appropriate to avoid injury. Before moving a load, ensure that it does not obstruct your view. Inform your immediate supervisor of any personal condition that may require review of your manual handling activities, e.g. medical condition, pregnancy. Consider whether there will be any obstacles in your path, any slipping, tripping or falling hazards, any stairways to be negotiated. If there is any doubt as to the correct manual handling arrangement, seek advice from your immediate supervisor.