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CMN'12 Understanding Objects in Museum Collections by Means of Narratives

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CMN'12 Understanding Objects in Museum Collections by Means of Narratives

  1. 1. Understanding Objects in Online Museum Collections by Means of Narratives 2012 Workshop on Computational Models of Narrative
  2. 2. Agora (1/2)• Department of Computer Science, VU University Amsterdam• Department of History, VU University Amsterdam• Rijksmuseum Amsterdam• Sound & Vision, Hilversum• blog: http://agora.cs.vu.nl/• Demonstrator: http://agora.cs.vu.nl/agoratouch/• Funded by NWO as part of the CATCH-program 2
  3. 3. Agora (2/2) Problem:• how to support the interpretation of objects in online museum collection? Approach:• (automatically) enrich object-metadata with events• facilitate event-driven browsing and facet search• establish object-event-relations• enable creation of event-event-relations, i.e. narratives -> How to model narratives in the history/heritage domain? 3
  4. 4. objects and events• event-properties: time, place, actor, and type• object-event-relations: - an object represents an event - an object is used in/functions in an event 4
  5. 5. modeling historical narratives (1/4)“Any term which can sensible be taken as a value for x in the expression ‘thehistory of x’ designates a temporal structure. Our criteria for identifying a, if a be avalue of x, determines which events are to be mentioned in our history. Not tohave a criterion for picking out some happenings as relevant and others asirrelevant is simply not to be in a position to write history at all.”Arthur Danto, Narration and Knowledge, (1985, p.167) 5
  6. 6. modeling historical narratives (2/4)“Any term which can sensible be taken as a value for x in the expression ‘thehistory of x’ designates a temporal structure. Our criteria for identifying a, if a be avalue of x, determines which events are to be mentioned in our history. Not tohave a criterion for picking out some happenings as relevant and others asirrelevant is simply not to be in a position to write history at all.”Arthur Danto, Narration and Knowledge, (1985, p.167)history of x = temporal structure, a narrative of xx = topic => three proto-narratives:- actor: biographical proto-narrative- concept: conceptual proto-narrative- place: topological proto-narrativea = event property (actor, type (concept), place) corresponding to the topic-> first dimension of ordering events and their related objectsAll events belonging to a narrative can be reordered on the basis of their event-properties-> second dimension of ordering events and their related objects 6
  7. 7. modeling historical narratives (3/4)actor event time place typeNetherlands Attack Yogyakarta 19-12-1948 Indonesia DecolonizationKNIL Java Military ConflictIndon. Rep. Yogyakarta Operation Crow AttackNetherlands Operation Crow 19-12-1948- Indonesia DecolonizationKNIL 5-1-1949 Java Military ConflictIndon. Rep SumatraNetherlands Big Attack 1-3-1949 Indonesia DecolonizationKNIL Java Military ConflictIndon. Rep Yogyakarta Attack 7
  8. 8. modeling historical narratives (4/4)• historical periods - as names of complex events/series of events - as projects -> as conceptual narratives• structures - structures as event-types - particular events as instances of event-types -> as conceptual narratives 8
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  12. 12. Thank Youhttp://agora.cs.vu.nl/

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