Cets 2014 osborn new competency model

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  • DEMOGRAPHICS, BEHAVIORS AND TECHNOLOGY – WHY MOBILE IS CRITI

    Behavior – as we will show you, the adoption rate of smart phones and tablet has simply exploded in the last few years. And the rate of market penetration of these devices doesn’t look like its’ really slowing down much.

    Technology – this is actually a multi-part element beginning with the devices themselves. As we’ll explain in a moment, there appeared to be some hesitancy in MANY industrial segments – learning included – to move into mobile development due to uncertainty over which platform of operating system would prevail. Then there are questions about which device – smart phone vs. tablet. The devices are now a lot faster and carry much more computing power, so they can handle far more complex applications. Now you couple that with advances in the learning technology and you have the industry catching up to the market, and we’re starting to see some progress.

    Last – but certainly not least – demographics. Our work force is changing as young people are entering the workforce in larger numbers. They are changing the way we work and communicate. Continuous connectivity is only ONE of the changes they are brining, and that means they are bringing their mobile devices to the office with them. What’s more – they expect to use these devices for work.
    CAL TO YOUR LEARNING STRATEGY?
  • . If we need organizations, leaders and employees to be agile learners (learn from experience and able to function in times of great uncertainty), by extension we need learning professionals equipped to develop those leaders and employees. The ASTD model won’t get us there – at least in our view.
     
     
    The competency model is as follows:
     
    Collaboration: forms the foundational organizational and team dynamics of effective modern organizations. Collaborative organizations will be more innovative and this also helps inform the core communication model (no silos!) for the most effective and efficient flow of information, knowledge and learning.
     
    Networking: today’s learning professionals will need to be expert networkers. Organizations will be more collaborative and flatter, which means less structure and less hierarchy. So learning professionals have to connect various parts of organizations together to help employees, teams and departments access information, expertise and knowledge as needed, when needed and in ways that can be absorbed and applied to job performance. This will require building relationships founded upon trust and the application of emotional intelligence to ensure all stakeholders are engaged and involved.
     
    Leadership: there is no room for passive learning professionals. The most effective professionals will be thought leaders in their organization with a wide range of interests, able to communicate with and across all levels of the organization. They will be able to identify talented people and develop them and these learning professionals will motivate by example, word and deed, and lastly – these will be people who are highly engaged AND engaging.
     
    The three sets of competencies above form the core of the interpersonal skills/competencies crucial to success. The next competency is crucial because learning professionals have to be able to communicate their message and vision to others.
     
    Presentation Skills: to execute, learning professionals will have to be experts at developing professional level presentations, verbal communications, visual communication and information design. This goes far beyond simple competence at PowerPoint or Notes or some other presentation application. Presentation skills includes the ability to tailor appropriate messages to the audience, blend different communication modalities to communicate information in the most effective way possible and never – ever – bore a live audience. See www.presentationzen.com andwww.slideology.com.
     
    Last – but by no means least – is the “connective tissue” element that ties all of the above elements together.
     
    Digital Literacy: we are not referring JUST to social media – though social media is an element of digital literacy. Digital literacy is something greater and more complete. Digitally literate professionals are people who are willing to embrace technology as tools and elements of solutions to a broad range of business and communication problems. Most (not all) innovation in the marketplace is rooted in advances in technology, and that means organizations and people who will remain vital and current will have to be open to new ideas and technology advances. So learning professionals will have to dedicate themselves to staying on top of developments in learning technology and social technology. The final element here is a mastery of learning content. Learning content can be anything and come from anyplace in today’s world. As more and more user generated content is applied to solve work related problems, and we use more social learning tools, we must master how to use all types of learning content – the development of content, how to curate content, disperse content and organize content. And – in today’s world – delivery of content will require technology platforms.
  • Keep it simple. Really. Too much of the thought leadership in the field of employee development and training makes the whole process seem mysterious and complicated. It doesn’t have to be that way.
     
    So let’s start by simplifying the vocabulary a little bit. There is a lot of research published about formal, informal and social learning. Forget about the differences between types of learning. Instead, focus on employee learning. Training, therefore, becomes a subset of the overall employee learning strategy. So – it’s really all about learning. No more. No less.
     
    In today’s work environment, there are really three core questions for us to answer:
     
    What does an effective employee learning function look like?
    What does today’s effective and relevant employee learning function do?
    Who performs employee learning in today’s organizations?

    The answer to these questions isn’t that complicated, either. Our economic environment is changing, and our employees are bringing external influences with them to the workplace. A workplace in which we have to shift our learning focus away from a traditional “corporate structure” or training department approach, and think of learning more like a network where user generated content and influencers are more important. We’ll explain all of this in more detail – right now!

  • Employee learning can be reduced to a simple mission – help employees perform better. We would argue that this simple mission has always been at the core of employee development, but we’ve lost our way a little in all of the theoretical discussions around the fringes.

    Now – don’t make the mistake of thinking that by simplifying our thinking and mission, we’re making the job easier. In fact, the job of employee learning has never been more difficult in some ways. We have to find ways to incorporate new tools. We will have to find ways to use tools that have not yet emerged. We will have to train for jobs that don’t exist today, and these jobs might be crucial to our success. These jobs might emerge in the next one to three years. This function – employee learning – will not be easy.
  • Job titles roles, that didn’t exist
    Indeed
    Career builder

    http://talent.linkedin.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Top-10-job-titles-that-didnt-exist-5-years-ago_fin.jpg
  • We know employee learning needs to do a few things differently, so what will that look like?

    In some important ways, it will look the same. Some of the things we do work really well. In other ways, we’ll need to shake things up a little. The answers to this important question will vary a bit from organization to organization. The factors that will influence the structure of your employee learning function will range from employee readiness and receptivity to technology to organizational culture. It doesn’t matter in the end how you build your function as long as the function delivers critical, strategic results and helps employees learn, unlearn and relearn the skills and competencies your organization needs to succeed.

    Generally, employee learning functions or departments will look different going forward. Organizations are always looking for ways to cut costs and like many support functions, employee development is nearly always scrutinized for cuts. That pressure is likely going to continue. So, future employee learning functions will likely share many of the following traits and characteristics:

    Smaller and decentralized
    Flat (fewer managers and more specialists)
    Technology dependent
    Collaborative
    Network based and driven
    Content curators and creators

    People
    Today’s workforce is more specialized than ever. Your top talent in customer service, sales, product development, marketing and manufacturing aren’t necessarily in leadership positions or managing people – they’re doing their jobs and they are stretched thin. But in the end it’s the power of your people – the power of the crowd and the wisdom of the crowd - that will lift your employee learning to a new level. As learning professionals we have to find ways to facilitate and motivate this growth.
    Tools
    To support widespread organizational learning we need tools to allow easy access and provide context to the training materials, user-generated content, sharing and feedback. The use of tools and learning technology enables more collaboration across the organization. In addition, it makes it easier for employees at all levels to reach knowledgeable leaders and co-workers across the organization.

    Context.
    “We need technologies to support learning at work today. We can buy them packaged in a single, centralized system, or we can assemble them ourselves and integrate them as much or as little as we wish. They can be our learning management system, our personal learning environment, our knowledge network or whatever. Whatever we call these tools and systems, the key thing is what they do. Properly implemented, they help us make sense of the issues we face, and work better as a result,” Donald Taylor, from the blog post, What Does LMS mean today?




  • We know employee learning needs to do a few things differently, so what will that look like?

    In some important ways, it will look the same. Some of the things we do work really well. In other ways, we’ll need to shake things up a little. The answers to this important question will vary a bit from organization to organization. The factors that will influence the structure of your employee learning function will range from employee readiness and receptivity to technology to organizational culture. It doesn’t matter in the end how you build your function as long as the function delivers critical, strategic results and helps employees learn, unlearn and relearn the skills and competencies your organization needs to succeed.

    Generally, employee learning functions or departments will look different going forward. Organizations are always looking for ways to cut costs and like many support functions, employee development is nearly always scrutinized for cuts. That pressure is likely going to continue. So, future employee learning functions will likely share many of the following traits and characteristics:

    Smaller and decentralized
    Flat (fewer managers and more specialists)
    Technology dependent
    Collaborative
    Network based and driven
    Content curators and creators

    People
    Today’s workforce is more specialized than ever. Your top talent in customer service, sales, product development, marketing and manufacturing aren’t necessarily in leadership positions or managing people – they’re doing their jobs and they are stretched thin. But in the end it’s the power of your people – the power of the crowd and the wisdom of the crowd - that will lift your employee learning to a new level. As learning professionals we have to find ways to facilitate and motivate this growth.
    Tools
    To support widespread organizational learning we need tools to allow easy access and provide context to the training materials, user-generated content, sharing and feedback. The use of tools and learning technology enables more collaboration across the organization. In addition, it makes it easier for employees at all levels to reach knowledgeable leaders and co-workers across the organization.

    Context.
    “We need technologies to support learning at work today. We can buy them packaged in a single, centralized system, or we can assemble them ourselves and integrate them as much or as little as we wish. They can be our learning management system, our personal learning environment, our knowledge network or whatever. Whatever we call these tools and systems, the key thing is what they do. Properly implemented, they help us make sense of the issues we face, and work better as a result,” Donald Taylor, from the blog post, What Does LMS mean today?




  • As we’ve learned a little more about what an employee learning program should look like and do, we need to shift our thinking to who performs the function in today’s organizations. Traditionally, we’ve looked to employee development professionals to perform the functional roles associated with employee development, training and learning. But given the flat, collaborative nature of today’s work environments, does it make sense to continue to rely solely upon these same professionals to fill that role?
     
    The correct answer is, “It depends . . . .” We will need a new kind of learning professional to succeed in this economic environment marked by volatility, uncertainty, complexity and ambiguity.

    We’ll need professionals with these traits and characteristics:

    Digitally confident
    Highly connected professionals (internally and externally)
    Collaborative
    Engaged with ambiguity
    Agile learners
    Influences
    Informal leaders

    These types of professionals will be able to adapt and grow with our employees to meet emerging development challenges.

    So – who will perform the employee learning function of the future?

    Everyone. Open access to technology and networking tools make that not only possible, but completely routine.

    Informal Leaders
    Employees – each one
    Traditional roles still matter
    Instructional designers – how to build content in new modalities
    Classroom facilitators – collaborators and connectors not lecturers
    Administrators – information hubs and influencers

  • Collaboration, networking, leadership,(INTERPERSONAL) >>>> presentation skills (MY ABILITY TO COMMUNICATE WITH OTHER PEOPLE), social technology (CONNECTIVE TISSUE)

    “human evolution”


    Collaboration:
    Team dynamics
    Communication
    Innovation


    Presentation skills – building presentation, verbal presentation and information design
    Presentations are about change. Businesses, and indeed all professions, have to change and adapt in order to stay alive.

    Networking:
    Building trust
    Listening skills – art of conversation
    Emotional intelligence
    “the art of building mutually beneficial relationships”

    Social technology:
    Digital literacy
    Social media
    Learning technology

    Leadership –
    Clarity in the face of complexity and ambiguity
    Clarity of mission – embrace complexity and ambiguity
    Instead of anticipate the future

    more modern view of leadership competencies might include:

    Collaboration skills – interpersonal skills
    People development – similar or the same
    Social media literacy
    Global citizenship – intelligence & character
    Ability to anticipate the future – vision

    It’s very interesting to see how our view of leadership continues to evolve – sort of like the way we are seeing the economy and market evolve.

    Expected level of proficiency of each competency is going to vary depending on their level within the organization.





  • Collaboration: forms the foundational organizational and team dynamics of effective modern organizations. Collaborative organizations will be more innovative and this also helps inform the core communication model (no silos!) for the most effective and efficient flow of information, knowledge and learning.
  • Why collaboration
    Organization and team dynamics
    Communication
    Innovation
  • QUALITY
    scientific journal articles with multiple authors are cited as authoritative by their peers at a much higher rate than solo or paired authored articles and studies. These collaborative studies have been proven to be more accurate worthwhile and scientifically valid.
    Quantitative take on the idea of crowd wisdom

    http://www.assembledchaos.com/20-benefits-of-collaboration-as-a-researcher-you-cannot-afford-to-ignore/
  • Networking: today’s learning professionals will need to be expert networkers. Organizations will be more collaborative and flatter, which means less structure and less hierarchy. So learning professionals have to connect various parts of organizations together to help employees, teams and departments access information, expertise and knowledge as needed, when needed and in ways that can be absorbed and applied to job performance. This will require building relationships founded upon trust and the application of emotional intelligence to ensure all stakeholders are engaged and involved.
  • Why networking:
    Building trust
    Emotional intelligence
    Conversation skills
  • ADD ARROWS

    TWO IMAGES AND TEXT BOX –

    INFO = POWER (1960s male exec)

    INFLUENCE = POWER (female millenial causual – connected)
  • ADD ARROWS

    TWO IMAGES AND TEXT BOX –

    INFO = POWER (1960s male exec)

    INFLUENCE = POWER (female millenial causual – connected)
  • Leadership: there is no room for passive learning professionals. The most effective professionals will be thought leaders in their organization with a wide range of interests, able to communicate with and across all levels of the organization. They will be able to identify talented people and develop them and these learning professionals will motivate by example, word and deed, and lastly – these will be people who are highly engaged AND engaging.
  • Why leadership skills:
    People development
    Communicating vision
    Motivating and engaging

    a different approach to our own careers
    Guide and coach
    Explaining the why to people – the power of why? What happens to orgs and team when leaders explain the why?
    Framework to ask good questions and make significant contributions – informed insights and perspectives – instead just a checkbox
    Communicating a vision
    Dan pink – what makes people tick
  • Less-than-optimal leadership practices cost companies millions of dollars each year (equal to 7% of annual sales) by negatively impacting employee retention, customer satisfaction, and overall employee productivity…

    At least 9% and possibly
    as much as 32% of an
    organization’s voluntary
    turnover can be avoided
    through better leadership skills.

    Better leadership can
    generate a 3 to 4%
    improvement in customer
    satisfaction scores and
    a corresponding 1.5%
    increase in revenue growth

    Most organizations are
    operating with a 5% to 10%
    productivity drag that better
    leadership practices could
    eliminate.




    These findings are cited from the report available for download on Partners site: Making the Business Case for Leadership Development

    © 2011 The Ken Blanchard Companies.
  • Less-than-optimal leadership practices cost companies millions of dollars each year (equal to 7% of annual sales) by negatively impacting employee retention, customer satisfaction, and overall employee productivity…

    At least 9% and possibly
    as much as 32% of an
    organization’s voluntary
    turnover can be avoided
    through better leadership skills.

    Better leadership can
    generate a 3 to 4%
    improvement in customer
    satisfaction scores and
    a corresponding 1.5%
    increase in revenue growth

    Most organizations are
    operating with a 5% to 10%
    productivity drag that better
    leadership practices could
    eliminate.




    These findings are cited from the report available for download on Partners site: Making the Business Case for Leadership Development

    © 2011 The Ken Blanchard Companies.
  • Less-than-optimal leadership practices cost companies millions of dollars each year (equal to 7% of annual sales) by negatively impacting employee retention, customer satisfaction, and overall employee productivity…

    At least 9% and possibly
    as much as 32% of an
    organization’s voluntary
    turnover can be avoided
    through better leadership skills.

    Better leadership can
    generate a 3 to 4%
    improvement in customer
    satisfaction scores and
    a corresponding 1.5%
    increase in revenue growth

    Most organizations are
    operating with a 5% to 10%
    productivity drag that better
    leadership practices could
    eliminate.




    These findings are cited from the report available for download on Partners site: Making the Business Case for Leadership Development

    © 2011 The Ken Blanchard Companies.
  • Less-than-optimal leadership practices cost companies millions of dollars each year (equal to 7% of annual sales) by negatively impacting employee retention, customer satisfaction, and overall employee productivity…

    At least 9% and possibly
    as much as 32% of an
    organization’s voluntary
    turnover can be avoided
    through better leadership skills.

    Better leadership can
    generate a 3 to 4%
    improvement in customer
    satisfaction scores and
    a corresponding 1.5%
    increase in revenue growth

    Most organizations are
    operating with a 5% to 10%
    productivity drag that better
    leadership practices could
    eliminate.




    These findings are cited from the report available for download on Partners site: Making the Business Case for Leadership Development

    © 2011 The Ken Blanchard Companies.
  • Collaboration, networking, leadership,(INTERPERSONAL) >>>> presentation skills (MY ABILITY TO COMMUNICATE WITH OTHER PEOPLE), social technology (CONNECTIVE TISSUE)

    “human evolution”


    Collaboration:
    Team dynamics
    Communication
    Innovation


    Presentation skills – building presentation, verbal presentation and information design
    Presentations are about change. Businesses, and indeed all professions, have to change and adapt in order to stay alive.

    Networking:
    Building trust
    Listening skills – art of conversation
    Emotional intelligence
    “the art of building mutually beneficial relationships”

    Social technology:
    Digital literacy
    Social media
    Learning technology

    Leadership –
    Clarity in the face of complexity and ambiguity
    Clarity of mission – embrace complexity and ambiguity
    Instead of anticipate the future

    more modern view of leadership competencies might include:

    Collaboration skills – interpersonal skills
    People development – similar or the same
    Social media literacy
    Global citizenship – intelligence & character
    Ability to anticipate the future – vision

    It’s very interesting to see how our view of leadership continues to evolve – sort of like the way we are seeing the economy and market evolve.

    Expected level of proficiency of each competency is going to vary depending on their level within the organization.





  • Cets 2014 osborn new competency model

    1. 1. In a world of learning and development where complexity is the enemy, [organizations need a] simple and nimble approach to delivering high quality learning, anywhere, anytime. MICHAEL ROCHELLE Chief Strategy Officer Brandon-Hall Group
    2. 2. What does it mean?
    3. 3. More connected?
    4. 4. More alone?
    5. 5. More risk?
    6. 6. Or, just more?
    7. 7. WTF? What’s The Future of Learning?
    8. 8. WHAT I HOPE YOU’LL LEARN: …. That a next generation of learning needs is emerging and needs a next generation learning professional to deliver …. The elements of a next generation competency model for learning professionals
    9. 9. ALTERNATE COMPETENCIES NETWORKINGCOLLABORATION PRESENTATION SKILLS DIGITAL LITERACY LEADERSHIP SKILLS
    10. 10. Most learning was focused on delivering known skills to solve known problems.
    11. 11. volatility uncertainty complexity ambiguity it’s a VUCA world…
    12. 12. THE % OF KNOWLEDGE IN YOUR BRAIN NEEDED TO DO YOUR JOB 1986 1997 2006 Source: Robert Kelly, Carnegie-Mellon University
    13. 13. demand speed, analysis and elimination of uncertainty patience, sense-making and an engagement with uncertainty. Denise Caron, It’s a VUCA World
    14. 14. Traditional approaches won’t work…
    15. 15. No classroom is large enough. No individual is smart enough. No response time is fast enough. No intervention is complete enough. No program lasts long enough. No solution is global enough. …
    16. 16. Attempting to do more of what has been done in the past is not the answer. We need to do new things in new ways. won’t work…
    17. 17. RULES OF THE ROAD MOBILE’S BIG IMPACT YOUTUBE COMES TO WORK
    18. 18. RULES OF THE ROAD
    19. 19. Everyday we create bytes of data… So much that 90% of the data in the world has been created in the last two years alone. SOURCE: IBM Understanding Big Data: Analytics for Enterprise Class Hadoop and Streaming Data 2.5 QUINTILLION
    20. 20. Employee learning today is about preparing employees for jobs that don’t exist, yet…
    21. 21. MOBILE’S BIG IMPACT
    22. 22. 9 out of 10 Americans already use their smartphones for work. Cisco BYOD Insights Report 2013
    23. 23. YOUTUBE COMES TO WORK
    24. 24. Over 6 billion hours of ….video are watched each month on YouTube… that's almost an hour for every person on Earth.
    25. 25. At least of employees already use their own smartphones/ devices to access work- related sites or information. 50%
    26. 26. The Evolving Role of Training and Development CONTENT CONCIERGE
    27. 27. Employee training and development …
    28. 28. What does it do? What does it look like? Who does it? …
    29. 29. What does it do? Resources and tools. Help employees perform better. Prepare for jobs that don’t exist today.
    30. 30. What does it look like?
    31. 31. COLLABORATIVE Network-based and driven Content curators and creators Smaller and decentralized FLAT – fewer managers more SPECIALISTS TECHNOLOGY dependent
    32. 32. Who does it? Informal leaders. Employees. Instructional designers. Classroom facilitators Administrators
    33. 33. EVERYONE…
    34. 34. ASTD COMPETENCIES 2013 BUSINESS SKILLS GLOBAL MINDSET INDUSTRY KNOWLEDGE INTERPERSONAL SKILLS PERSONAL SKILLS TECHNOLOGY LITERACY
    35. 35. ALTERNATE COMPETENCIES NETWORKINGCOLLABORATION PRESENTATION SKILLS DIGITAL LITERACY LEADERSHIP SKILLS
    36. 36. ALTERNATE COMPETENCIES COLLABORATION • Organization and team dynamics • Communication • Innovation
    37. 37. COLLABORATION ORGANIZATION AND TEAM DYNAMICS COMMUNICATIONINNOVATION
    38. 38. ALTERNATE COMPETENCIES NETWORKING • Building trust • Emotional intelligence • Conversation skills
    39. 39. NETWORKING BUILDING TRUST EMOTIONAL INTELLIGENCE CONVERSATION SKILLS
    40. 40. Knowledge = POWER
    41. 41. Influence = POWER
    42. 42. ALTERNATE COMPETENCIES LEADERSHIP SKILLS • People development • Communicating vision • Motivating and engaging
    43. 43. LEADERSHIP SKILLS PEOPLE DEVELOPMENT COMMUNICATING VISION MOTIVATING AND ENGAGING
    44. 44. POOR LEADERSHIP PRACTICES COST COMPANIES MILLIONS OF DOLLARS EACH YEAR - EQUAL TO OF ANNUAL SALES…7% SOURCE: Making the Business Case for Leadership Development, The Ken Blanchard Companies, 2011.
    45. 45. POOR LEADERSHIP PRACTICES NEGATIVELY IMPACT: EMPLOYEE RETENTION CUSTOMER SATISFACTION EMPLOYEE PRODUCTIVITY SOURCE: Making the Business Case for Leadership Development, The Ken Blanchard Companies, 2011.
    46. 46. AS MUCH AS OF AN ORGANIZATION’S VOLUNTARY TURNOVER CAN BE AVOIDED THROUGH BETTER LEADERSHIP SKILLS SOURCE: Making the Business Case for Leadership Development, The Ken Blanchard Companies, 2011. 32%
    47. 47. BETTER LEADERSHIP CAN GENERATE TO IMPROVEMENT IN CUSTOMER SATISFACTION SCORES … SOURCE: Making the Business Case for Leadership Development, The Ken Blanchard Companies, 2011. 3 4% CORRESPONDING TO INCREASE IN REVENUE GROWTH 1.5%
    48. 48. BETTER LEADERSHIP PRACTICES COULD ELIMINATE OF PRODUCTIVITY DRAG SOURCE: Making the Business Case for Leadership Development, The Ken Blanchard Companies, 2011. 5 - 10%
    49. 49. ALTERNATE COMPETENCIES PRESENTATION SKILLS • Developing presentations • Verbal communication • Information design
    50. 50. PRESENTATION SKILLS DEVELOPING PRESENTATIONS VERBAL COMMUNICATION INFORMATION DESIGN
    51. 51. Whether you’re a CEO, senior manager, or educator, you create presentations that have incredibly high stakes. Stock value, sales revenue, career promotions, and behavior changes are all influenced by presentations every day. Nancy Duarte Slide;ology, Foreword
    52. 52. Americans’ Favorite Sport 0% 5% 10% 15% 20% 25% 30% 35% 40% Pro Football Major League Baseball College Football Auto Racing NBA NHL College Basketball
    53. 53. 35%NFL favorite sport
    54. 54. SANDWICHES AND STORYTELLING
    55. 55. ALTERNATE COMPETENCIES DIGITAL LITERACY • Learning technology • Social technology • Content mastery
    56. 56. DIGITAL LITERACY LEARNING TECHNOLOGY SOCIAL TECHNOLOGYCONTENT MASTERY
    57. 57. Digital literacy defines those capabilities which fit an individual for living, learning and working in a digital society. JISC - 2009
    58. 58. ALTERNATE COMPETENCIES NETWORKINGCOLLABORATION PRESENTATION SKILLS DIGITAL LITERACY LEADERSHIP SKILLS
    59. 59. CHRIS OSBORN VP OF MARKETING COSBORN@BIZLIBRARY.COM @CHRISOSBORNSTL

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