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WETRATS

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Demonstration of the WETRATS technique using Romeo and Juliet

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WETRATS

  1. 1. Writing a good analytical paragraph What does stand for? Why is this important?
  2. 2. POINT: What are you going to argue in this paragraph? EVIDENCE: A quote from the text to support your point. EXPLANATION: Where you analyse the quote.
  3. 3. WET RATS • Words • Effect / embedded quotations • Techniques • Reader’s reaction • Author’s intention / alternative interpretations • Themes / Time • Structure
  4. 4. Using Wet Rats in Romeo and Juliet Stage One: conventional PEE Tybalt is established as a violent, confident and arrogant character. We know this because he says “Peace? I hate the word, as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.” This shows that he does not want peace, but wants to continue the argument in Scene 1 because he hates Montagues with all his heart.
  5. 5. Using Wet Rats in Romeo and Juliet Stage One: conventional PEE Tybalt is established as a violent, confident and arrogant character. We know this because he says “Peace? I hate the word, as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.” This shows that he does not want peace, but wants to continue the argument in Scene 1 because he hates Montagues with all his heart.
  6. 6. Using Wet Rats in Romeo and Juliet Stage One: conventional PEE Tybalt is established as a violent, confident and arrogant character. We know this because he says “Peace? I hate the word, as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.” This shows that he does not want peace, but wants to continue the argument in Scene 1 because he hates Montagues with all his heart.
  7. 7. Using Wet Rats in Romeo and Juliet Stage One: conventional PEE Tybalt is established as a violent, confident and arrogant character. We know this because he says “Peace? I hate the word, as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.” This shows that he does not want peace, but wants to continue the argument in Scene 1 because he hates Montagues with all his heart.
  8. 8. Using Wet Rats in Romeo and Juliet Stage 2: W (use of words) Tybalt is established as a violent, confident and arrogant character. We know this because he says “Peace? I hate the word, as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.” The use of the word “hate” shows what is motivating Tybalt. W
  9. 9. Using Wet Rats in Romeo and Juliet Stage 3: E (effect) Tybalt is established as a violent, confident and arrogant character. We know this because he says “Peace? I hate the word, as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.” The use of the word “hate” shows what is motivating Tybalt, as he is driven by anger and hatred. W E
  10. 10. Using Wet Rats in Romeo and Juliet Stage 4: T (technique) Tybalt is established as a violent, confident and arrogant character. We know this because he says “Peace? I hate the word, as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.” The use of the word “hate” shows what is motivating Tybalt, as he is driven by anger and hatred. His use of a rhetorical question to open his speech shows how unbelievable he finds it that anyone could consider “peace”. W E T
  11. 11. Using Wet Rats in Romeo and Juliet Stage 5: R (reaction) Tybalt is established as a violent, confident and arrogant character. We know this because he says “Peace? I hate the word, as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.” The use of the word “hate” shows what is motivating Tybalt, as he is driven by anger and hatred. His use of a rhetorical question to open his speech shows how unbelievable he finds it that anyone could consider “peace”. Any hope the audience might have had for a peaceful end to the argument disappears with Tybalt’s arrival, as he inflames the situation and takes it from a scuffle between servants to a full-blown street brawl. W E T R
  12. 12. Using Wet Rats in Romeo and Juliet Stage 6: A (Author’s intention / alternative interpretation) Tybalt is established as a violent, confident and arrogant character. We know this because he says “Peace? I hate the word, as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.” The use of the word “hate” shows what is motivating Tybalt, as he is driven by anger and hatred. His use of a rhetorical question to open his speech shows how unbelievable he finds it that anyone could consider “peace”. Any hope the audience might have had for a peaceful end to the argument disappears with Tybalt’s arrival, as he inflames the situation and takes it from a scuffle between servants to a full-blown street brawl. Shakespeare is showing the audience how the two families have a long-standing hatred of one another and that any meeting between them is almost certain to end in fighting and bloodshed. W E T R A
  13. 13. Using Wet Rats in Romeo and Juliet Stage 7: T (Themes) Tybalt is established as a violent, confident and arrogant character. We know this because he says “Peace? I hate the word, as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.” The use of the word “hate” shows what is motivating Tybalt, as he is driven by anger and hatred. His use of a rhetorical question to open his speech shows how unbelievable he finds it that anyone could consider “peace”. Any hope the audience might have had for a peaceful end to the argument disappears with Tybalt’s arrival, as he inflames the situation and takes it from a scuffle between servants to a full-blown street brawl. Shakespeare is showing the audience how the two families have a long-standing hatred of one another and that any meeting between them is almost certain to end in fighting and bloodshed. He is also showing how love and hate are opposed throughout the play by contrasting the words “peace” and “hate”. W E T R A T
  14. 14. Using Wet Rats in Romeo and Juliet Stage 8: S (Structure) Tybalt is established as a violent, confident and arrogant character. We know this because he says “Peace? I hate the word, as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.” The use of the word “hate” shows what is motivating Tybalt, as he is driven by anger and hatred. His use of a rhetorical question to open his speech shows how unbelievable he finds it that anyone could consider “peace”. Any hope the audience might have had for a peaceful end to the argument disappears with Tybalt’s arrival, as he inflames the situation and takes it from a scuffle between servants to a full-blown street brawl. Shakespeare is showing the audience how the two families have a long-standing hatred of one another and that any meeting between them is almost certain to end in fighting and bloodshed. He is also showing how love and hate are opposed throughout the play by contrasting the words “peace” and “hate” and by showing peaceful Benvolio opposite violent Tybalt. W E T R A T S
  15. 15. Compare and contrast Tybalt is established as a violent, confident and arrogant character. We know this because he says “Peace? I hate the word, as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.” This shows that he does not want peace, but wants to continue the argument in Scene 1 because he hates Montagues with all his heart. Tybalt is established as a violent, confident and arrogant character. We know this because he says “Peace? I hate the word, as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.” The use of the word “hate” shows what is motivating Tybalt, as he is driven by anger and hatred. His use of a rhetorical question to open his speech shows how unbelievable he finds it that anyone could consider “peace”. Any hope the audience might have had for a peaceful end to the argument disappears with Tybalt’s arrival, as he inflames the situation and takes it from a scuffle between servants to a full-blown street brawl. Shakespeare is showing the audience how the two families have a long-standing hatred of one another and that any meeting between them is almost certain to end in fighting and bloodshed. He is also showing how love and hate are opposed throughout the play by contrasting the words “peace” and “hate” and by showing peaceful Benvolio opposite violent Tybalt.
  16. 16. Compare and contrast PEE Tybalt is established as a violent, confident and arrogant character. We know this because he says “Peace? I hate the word, as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.” This shows that he does not want peace, but wants to continue the argument in Scene 1 because he hates Montagues with all his heart. WETRATS Tybalt is established as a violent, confident and arrogant character. We know this because he says “Peace? I hate the word, as I hate hell, all Montagues, and thee.” The use of the word “hate” shows what is motivating Tybalt, as he is driven by anger and hatred. His use of a rhetorical question to open his speech shows how unbelievable he finds it that anyone could consider “peace”. Any hope the audience might have had for a peaceful end to the argument disappears with Tybalt’s arrival, as he inflames the situation and takes it from a scuffle between servants to a full-blown street brawl. Shakespeare is showing the audience how the two families have a long-standing hatred of one another and that any meeting between them is almost certain to end in fighting and bloodshed. He is also showing how love and hate are opposed throughout the play by contrasting the words “peace” and “hate” and by showing peaceful Benvolio opposite violent Tybalt.
  17. 17. WET RATS • Words • Effect / embedded quotations • Techniques • Reader’s reaction • Author’s intention / alternative interpretations • Themes / Time • Structure

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