Lessons 6 and 7 for blog

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Lessons 6 and 7 for blog

  1. 1. Title: The Multi-Modal MergeCreate questions to analyse attitudes to digitalcommunicationS4L: Reflection
  2. 2. The aim of this study...Understand variations in spoken language,explaining why language changes in relationto contexts.Evaluate the impact of spoken languagechoices in their own and others’ use.
  3. 3. Explore different social attitudes to the waysdigital communications are affecting language.
  4. 4. Mind-Map the debates that we’ve looked at so far
  5. 5. Explore different social attitudes to the waysdigital communications are affecting language.How can you find out what people think?
  6. 6. Design a questionnaire/ interview to explore attitudesSkilled will... Have clear questions that will probe someattitudes to how digital communicationmay be affecting languageIdentify some people to ask that may havedifferent attitudesExcellentwill...Have precise questions that explore a rangeof key issues arising from the use ofdigital communicationIdentify and full range of interviewcandidates that will have alternativeviews
  7. 7. Peer assessCan they improve their questions?
  8. 8. Title: How to do it well.Evaluate responses and incorporate this success into ourown writingS4L: Independence
  9. 9. Explore different social attitudes to the ways digitalcommunications are affecting language.
  10. 10. Spoken Language StudyControlled Assessment CriteriaUnderstand variations in spoken language, explaining why language changes in relation tocontexts.Evaluate the impact of spoken language choices in their own and others’ use.Band 5 17–20 marks Candidates demonstrate‘Sophisticated, perceptive analysis and evaluation of aspects of how they and others use and adaptspoken language for specific purposesImpressive’ sustained and sophisticated interpretations of key features found in spoken language datasophisticated analysis and evaluation of key issues arising from public attitudes to spoken languagevarieties.Band 4 13–16 marks Candidates demonstrate‘Confident explanation and analysis of how they and others use and adapt spoken language for specificpurposesconfident analysis and reflection on features found in some spoken language dataconfident analysis of some issues arising from public attitudes to spoken language varieties.Band 3 9–12 marks Candidates demonstrate‘Clear, Consistent’ explanation of how they and others use and adapt spoken language for specificpurposesexploration of features found in some spoken language dataexploration of some issues arising from public attitudes to spoken language varieties.Band 2 5–8 marks Candidates demonstrate‘Some’ some awareness of how they and others use and adapt spoken language for specific purposessome understanding of significant features found in some spoken language datasome awareness of public attitudes to spoken language varieties.
  11. 11. Read these essaysWhich one is better?Why?
  12. 12. Where does this do well? Where can it improve?Over the internet, people try to save time typing, so words areabbreviated. E.g. Ex 3 ‘Sat. Night’ (Saturday night) andlonger phrases are made into initialisms e.g FB (Facebook).If said aloud, many acronyms used in messaging are just aslong as the actual words, so this usually only occurs on theweb or occasionally in written words. The need to shortenone’s typing time has lead to the need for other ways toshorten words, like with letter of number homophones suchas ‘gr8’ or ‘L8r’, ‘c u 2moro’. Although, again, this isinformal English so one wouldn’t use it in an importantemail to your boss, or possibly to someone who is older asthis technique is used more frequently by young people.
  13. 13. Your essay should have...Skilledwill...• Confident explanation and analysis of how they andothers use and adapt spoken language for specific purposes• confident analysis and reflection on features found insome spoken language data• confident analysis of some issues arising from publicattitudes to spoken language varieties.Excellentwill...• Sophisticated, perceptive analysis and evaluation ofaspects of how they and others use and adapt spokenlanguage for specific purposes• Impressive’ sustained and sophisticatedinterpretations of key features found in spoken languagedata• Sophisticated analysis and evaluation of key issuesarising from public attitudes to spoken language varieties
  14. 14. Now go back to the paragraph you wrote for HWUse the same skills to evaluate your own writing.Write awwwEbiNow re-write it.
  15. 15. Formative titleExplore different social attitudes to the ways textmessages are affecting language.
  16. 16. Example analysisThere are many arguments surrounding the use of abbreviated and non-standard English andspelling used in the multi-modal communication. In Data set 2 B replies to A’s question “hows u?”with the response “gud thanx, u?” Firstly, B uses a non-standard feature, not using a capital letter.This is slightly quicker and easier than using a capital letter as she doesn’t need to press the shift key.It is also very informal. Whilst internet communication is often less formal than other forms ofwriting, this is so informal that it suggests A and B are good friends with each other. Secondly, both“gud” and “thanx” are spelt phonetically, which could be seen as something done for brevity, as bothwords have one less letter than usual and again, it suggests informality. However, this kind ofphonetic representation is fashionable among teenagers and this may be an example of B adaptingher language because of her age and fashion, probably unconsciously. Additionally, phonetic featuressuch as this can be interpreted as an attempt to represent the sounds of natural speech in order tomake the conversation seem more like a real conversation. As a multi modal text, the conversationshares features with both written and spoken texts, and this phonological feature may be an attempt,probably unconscious again, to make the conversation seem closer to speech. Furthermore, the nonStandard spelling is mildly subversive: this type of language may be used so heavily by teenagersbecause it is almost a form of rebellion against the conformity of adults. It rejects Standard English. Aand B and many teenagers might see the use of such features as fun and a way of expressingthemselves. However, other people see it as a threat to the language and literacy. They believe ageneration is growing up unable to spell correctly because of SMS messages and the internet.Alternatively they may think that as with speech, Non Standard forms suggest that a person isuneducated or of a low class. In fact, there are other people, such as David Crystal, who believe that...

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