Using the Past to Chart the
Future: Evaluating Top Circulating
Print Books by Subject and Publisher
to Inform Future E-Boo...
What is the Virtual Library of Virginia
(VIVA)?
• 73 academic libraries (39 public, 33
private, Library of Virginia), incl...
www.vivalib.org

V
Context for the Collection Analysis
• The Steering and Resources for User
Committees had interest in buying e-books
togeth...
E-Books in VIVA
• E-books are relatively new for VIVA:
– Safari Tech Online, started in 2008.
– Springer and Elsevier purc...
Key Issue #1: Being Inclusive
• Needed a way for libraries of all sizes to
participate.
• Could not manage all books from ...
Key Issue #2: Standardizing Publishers
• Needed a way to efficiently clean the data so
that the publishers could be matche...
From the ISBN to the Publisher
• A portion of the ISBN is for the registrant
element, which is used to assign a block of
I...
From the ISBN to the Publisher
0195161467

• Using a listing of almost 116,000
publishers, the ISBN was mapped to an
indiv...
Report Criteria
•
•
•
•
•

Circulating print books only.
Published in 1980 or more recently.
Last circulated 7/1/08 or mor...
Data Sent to the Central Office
•
•
•
•
•
•
•

OCLC #
ISBN
publication year
call number
publisher
total number of circulat...
Number of Books by Institution
787

College of William & Mary

2,875

James Madison University

1,918

J. Sargeant Reynold...
Publishers by Number of Titles
600

500

400

300

200

100

1,233 Publishers Included
in the Data Set

0

The Virtual Lib...
Top 25 Overall Publishers by
Number of Titles
500
450
400

Publishers in the VIVA DDA Plan

350
300
250
200
150

Imprint o...
Proportion of Total Titles by
Publisher Groupings
14,000

12,000

10,000

8,000

6,000

All 1,233 Publishers
Top 100 Publi...
Number of Titles by Initial
Call Number Letter
T

Q
H

P
N

A
C
E
G
J
L
N
Q
S
U
Z

B
D
F
H
K
M
P
R
T
V

The Virtual Librar...
Top 10 Publishers in H: Social Sciences
140
120
100

80
60
40

20
0

The Virtual Library of Virginia
The consortium of the...
Top 10 Publishers in QA: Mathematics
160
140
120
100
80
60

Publisher represented by VIVA
current content purchase

40
20
...
Issues
• Does not account for e-book use, so this may
not be a relevant analysis to do in this way for
long.
• Course rese...
Where do we go from here?
• We could read the results as evidence that the
aggregated subscription packages would be
the b...
I’m happy to provide the
code and the publisher list –
just send me an email at
aelguind@gmu.edu.

The Virtual Library of ...
Special thanks to:
Dave Fjeld, VIVA Technical Support
And the VIVA Collection Analysis Task Force:
Stephen Clark, CWM
Gene...
USING THE PAST TO CHART THE
FUTURE: LOOKING AT PRINT
APPROVALS TO INFORM EBOOK
PURCHASING
Michael Matos
American Universit...
The Story Until Now..


Beginning in 2010 American University Library
started exploring purchasing ebook frontlists
direc...
Why are we doing this?





Digital-centric trends with our users
Increased emphasis of online learning
Space repurpos...
Looking at the print approvals
data
We Identified the publishers with the highest title
count
coming in on approval.

2012...
Our Knowledge Base Criteria











American University’s eBook Guidelines
DRM free or very open rights
Perpetua...
Comparing against other data
sources
(What our ILL statistics told us)


Circulations statistics





ILL statistics
...
Case Example: Springer
First purchased ebook frontlists for 2011

Packages in Sciences and Business/Economics
Reasons we s...
Case Example: Springer
Challenges faced with Springer ebooks.
Early on difficulty with their MARC records
Increased ILL re...
Challenges





Increased costs overall
Uncertainty regarding publishers’ commitment
to current model
Consortium access...
Questions?
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Using the Past to Chart the Future: Evaluating Top Circulating Print Books by Subject and Publisher to Inform Future E-Book Purchases

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Using the Past to Chart the Future: Evaluating Top Circulating Print Books by Subject and Publisher to Inform Future E-Book Purchases

  1. 1. Using the Past to Chart the Future: Evaluating Top Circulating Print Books by Subject and Publisher to Inform Future E-Book Purchases Anne C. Elguindi Deputy Director, VIVA Michael Matos Business and Economics Librarian, American University
  2. 2. What is the Virtual Library of Virginia (VIVA)? • 73 academic libraries (39 public, 33 private, Library of Virginia), including doctorals, four years, two years, and specialized institutions. • Central funding provided by the Commonwealth of Virginia, additional costsharing by members. • Grounded in the coordinated collection development of online resources and an extensive resource sharing program. The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  3. 3. www.vivalib.org V
  4. 4. Context for the Collection Analysis • The Steering and Resources for User Committees had interest in buying e-books together based on a collection analysis. • Of key interest was usage of print materials – which ones had patrons checked out consistently? • The goal was to discover publishers and subject areas that would be beneficial across the consortium. The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  5. 5. E-Books in VIVA • E-books are relatively new for VIVA: – Safari Tech Online, started in 2008. – Springer and Elsevier purchases, started in 2012, informed by an RFI process. – Demand Driven Acquisitions program, started in 2013, vendor EBL selected through an RFP process. The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  6. 6. Key Issue #1: Being Inclusive • Needed a way for libraries of all sizes to participate. • Could not manage all books from all libraries. • Wanted to avoid title-level matching and keep the results generalizable. • The result: Defined “top circulating” as enough titles to equal 10% of a school’s FTE. The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  7. 7. Key Issue #2: Standardizing Publishers • Needed a way to efficiently clean the data so that the publishers could be matched up and grouped across the records/titles. • The publisher field would be a difficult route. • The result: The ISBN was used to create a standardized publisher field. The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  8. 8. From the ISBN to the Publisher • A portion of the ISBN is for the registrant element, which is used to assign a block of ISBNs to a particular publisher. • 0-00 through 0-19 represent large publishers, because more numbers of the ISBN are left to distinguish individual books. • This pattern continues through to 0-9500000 through 0-9999999, which represent much smaller publishers. The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  9. 9. From the ISBN to the Publisher 0195161467 • Using a listing of almost 116,000 publishers, the ISBN was mapped to an individual publishers. The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  10. 10. Report Criteria • • • • • Circulating print books only. Published in 1980 or more recently. Last circulated 7/1/08 or more recently. Copies of books are to be treated together. Total circulations so that the total number of records equals 10% of the institution’s FTE. The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  11. 11. Data Sent to the Central Office • • • • • • • OCLC # ISBN publication year call number publisher total number of circulations last date circulated The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  12. 12. Number of Books by Institution 787 College of William & Mary 2,875 James Madison University 1,918 J. Sargeant Reynolds Community College 468 805 Northern Virginia Community College Old Dominion University 1,965 University of Richmond 3,545 Virginia Tech Total Books Included: 12,363 The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  13. 13. Publishers by Number of Titles 600 500 400 300 200 100 1,233 Publishers Included in the Data Set 0 The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  14. 14. Top 25 Overall Publishers by Number of Titles 500 450 400 Publishers in the VIVA DDA Plan 350 300 250 200 150 Imprint of Elsevier; included in VIVA frontlist purchase 100 50 0 The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  15. 15. Proportion of Total Titles by Publisher Groupings 14,000 12,000 10,000 8,000 6,000 All 1,233 Publishers Top 100 Publishers Top 25 Publishers 4,000 2,000 0 The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  16. 16. Number of Titles by Initial Call Number Letter T Q H P N A C E G J L N Q S U Z B D F H K M P R T V The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  17. 17. Top 10 Publishers in H: Social Sciences 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  18. 18. Top 10 Publishers in QA: Mathematics 160 140 120 100 80 60 Publisher represented by VIVA current content purchase 40 20 0 The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  19. 19. Issues • Does not account for e-book use, so this may not be a relevant analysis to do in this way for long. • Course reserves affects this significantly. • Publisher hierarchies are not reflected, making for a very long tail on the data. The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  20. 20. Where do we go from here? • We could read the results as evidence that the aggregated subscription packages would be the best choice for us. • We can also see some leading publishers emerge in particular subjects. This could guide our publisher approach in purchasing ebooks and seeking Demand Driven Acquisitions partnerships. The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  21. 21. I’m happy to provide the code and the publisher list – just send me an email at aelguind@gmu.edu. The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  22. 22. Special thanks to: Dave Fjeld, VIVA Technical Support And the VIVA Collection Analysis Task Force: Stephen Clark, CWM Gene Damon, VCCS David Gibbs, GMU Leslie O'Brien, VT Genya O’Gara, JMU Cassandra Taylor-Anderson, UR Robert Tench, ODU The Virtual Library of Virginia The consortium of the nonprofit academic libraries within the Commonwealth of Virginia
  23. 23. USING THE PAST TO CHART THE FUTURE: LOOKING AT PRINT APPROVALS TO INFORM EBOOK PURCHASING Michael Matos American University Library 11/8/2013
  24. 24. The Story Until Now..  Beginning in 2010 American University Library started exploring purchasing ebook frontlists directly from publishers. 2011, 2013, 2014 Springer  2011,2012 Oxford University Press and Palgrave   Developed a draft eBook policy in 2010 DRM  MARC Records (Discoverability)  Usability of platform 
  25. 25. Why are we doing this?     Digital-centric trends with our users Increased emphasis of online learning Space repurposing within the library Advantages buying eBooks directly from publishers Often better DRM than aggregators (ebrary, EBL, etc.)  Own rather than lease  Comprehensive coverage  Price per title often lower 
  26. 26. Looking at the print approvals data We Identified the publishers with the highest title count coming in on approval. 2012 Approvals title count Springer 16 University of California Press Compared against our knowledge base on the vendor terms, conditions and any antidotal information. 138 Yale 163 Harvard U 145 WW Norton Compare pricing 53 Oxford UP 459 Wiley Look at other data sources (ILL, PDA, consortium borrowing) Piloted with Springer, Oxford, Palgrave… 97 Palgrave Macmillan 488 Cambridge University Press 556 Cambridge Scholars 101 Elsevier 16 *Springer 178 titles in 2010
  27. 27. Our Knowledge Base Criteria        American University’s eBook Guidelines DRM free or very open rights Perpetual access Open URL Linking MARC Records Acceptance of the platform Vendor has not frustrated technical services
  28. 28. Comparing against other data sources (What our ILL statistics told us)  Circulations statistics    ILL statistics   Look at publisher and subject area Ranked by use Inconclusive and mildly disturbing Looked at the DDA  Analyze by Publisher and Area
  29. 29. Case Example: Springer First purchased ebook frontlists for 2011 Packages in Sciences and Business/Economics Reasons we started with Springer. Publishes in areas relevant to our users Good pricing model Great DRM Full-text Requests
  30. 30. Case Example: Springer Challenges faced with Springer ebooks. Early on difficulty with their MARC records Increased ILL requests Usage statistics not easily comparable to print circulation data. Denials by Year and Package
  31. 31. Challenges    Increased costs overall Uncertainty regarding publishers’ commitment to current model Consortium access challenges
  32. 32. Questions?

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