Bradford Lee Eden, Ph.D.Dean of Library ServicesValparaiso Universitybrad.eden@valpo.edu
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_zzPBbXjWs&feature=related
 Merriam-Webster online dictionaryhttp://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/status%20quo                 the existing sta...
   The economy/state support for higher education   Google digitization and book settlement   Social networking   Spac...
Technical services has been the microcosm for:Libraries have been the macrocosm for:                                      ...
1.   The costs involved in maintaining/updating/researching     bibliographic records, licensing costs (OCLC, vendor utili...
 Eden, Bradford Lee. ―We can‘t wait any longer: managing long-term employees    and organizational change.‖ The psycholog...
   How many of you/your libraries are still doing copy cataloging?   How many of you/your libraries still pay a vendor t...
 Reorganization towards the concept of collection services as  comprising the entire process of  creation, acquisition, d...
 Published by University Leadership Council 2011 Main audience: ―The University Leadership Council provides  provosts an...
High profits for commercial publishers – or jobs for academics?For-profit scholarly publishers are enjoying these gifts of...
From ―Ahead of the Storm: Research Libraries and the Future of the ResearchUniversity‖http://publications.arl.org/rli276/2...
Understand, value, and develop your talent. There is nosubstitute.Don’t play it safe. This fosters mediocrity, which, in a...
From UC NGTS Phase 2 ELCMS TF Report (September 2010):   Stop checking in print serials; but one campus should track care...
 Spending more time on collections that are currently uncataloged,    undescribed, and have little to no bibliographic ac...
Taken from the LAUC report to the LAUC Committee on Professional Governance:Collection Development: Meet demand for libra...
Reference/Instruction:   The reference and instruction librarian is positioned where the library meets its users, and fun...
Technical Services:1. Increased management responsibilities:   Project managers      cross-functional leadership        ...
Technical Services (continued)2. Technical services evolving into collection services:   It is no longer enough to provid...
Technical Services (continue)3. Bridge builders: Bridge builders who can inspire buy-in from stakeholders and find  meani...
Professional Governance/Organizational Culture: Willingness to adapt to rapidly evolving job duties both at our home  cam...
What Will Kill Our Profession      Is Not Ebooks, Amazon Or Google,             But A Lack Of                   Imagination
http://kcoyle.net/presentations/lita2011.html                           The Message (her conclusion) Weve got to move bey...
Not what you/your library holds or can access that everyone elsein the world already has, but what you have that is unique...
Getting away from what we need to do, know, plan, change…To how we should be reacting, feeling, taking charge, and emotion...
http://www.selfgrowth.com/selfimprovementnewsletters.htmlSelf-Improvement Newsletter“How to Lose it and Never Miss a Beat”...
“Want Real World Change? Stop Complaining” (August 2011)If you really want to change your life and help build a better wor...
   Article: 4 Emotions that can Lead to Life Change - By Jim Rohn (October 24, 2011)   Emotions are the most powerful fo...
   3) DESIRE    How does one gain desire? I dont think I can answer this directly because there are many ways. But I do k...
   *** Article: Top 10 Traits of Highly Successful People - That You Can Learn! - By Dr. Philip E. Humbert ***    Or Top ...
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/joe-robinson/living-a-meaningful-life_b_908263.html   Intrinsic motivation. Pursuing and en...
Buddhist quote: ―Lean into your discomfort‖―Work to live, not the other way around‖ (in other words, don‘t ―live to work‖)...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZCMkAB875I&feature=related
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The Status Quo Has Got To Go, by Brad Eden, Dean of Library Services, Valparaiso University (Sat 9:30 am)

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This presentation will focus on change management for libraries, and will set the backdrop of changes in the economy, information, technology, and higher education as the impetus for dramatic, transformational change in libraries. Slow, progressive, and risk-adverse change is no longer viable; constant, modular and risk-managed change is called for. Retooling and retraining current staff needs to be emphasized, along with a positive attitude and readiness to assist upper management in providing viable, necessary and important services in the new digital environment to our patrons, university, community, and regional consortia.

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The Status Quo Has Got To Go, by Brad Eden, Dean of Library Services, Valparaiso University (Sat 9:30 am)

  1. 1. Bradford Lee Eden, Ph.D.Dean of Library ServicesValparaiso Universitybrad.eden@valpo.edu
  2. 2. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7_zzPBbXjWs&feature=related
  3. 3.  Merriam-Webster online dictionaryhttp://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/status%20quo the existing state of affairsExamples of STATUS QUO He is content with the status quo and does not like change.<civic leaders who are afraid to do anything that mightchange the towns status quo>
  4. 4.  The economy/state support for higher education Google digitization and book settlement Social networking Space (people, collections)  Distributed print repositories, shared print-in-place Open stack: $4.26; High density storage: .86; Hybrid (10 years in open stacks): $1.53; Hybrid (20 years in open stacks): $1.99 30-50% of Harvard, UCLA, UCB, and Columbia‘s collections are off-site with no evidence of adverse effects on scholarship or national reputation (70 million books) Shifting resources to providing access to unique local collections: no metadata vs. bad metadata; no access vs. some/complete access; availability vs. invisibility. Getting out of the print mentality; moving the organizational culture to the digital mentality Moving from the local to the network level in collaborations, metadata, and resource sharing (Next Generation Technical Services in the University of California System) http://libraries.universityofcalifornia.edu/about/uls/ngts/ Move towards open access and scholarly communication  Digital preservation (NIH, NSF, etc.)  Institutional repositories  Copyright/Author rights Web and Library 3.0, mobile devices, media literacy 3D information visualization  http://www.thebanmappingproject.com/ Assessment
  5. 5. Technical services has been the microcosm for:Libraries have been the macrocosm for: BAD PR NO MARKETING Recent OCLC Report debunks 80/20 myth of circulation use: it is actually 6.5% ARL statistics show 50-60% decline in reference transactions since 1995 15% of printed volumes, 27% of manuscripts, 35% of audio/video collections, and 71% of born digital materials held in special collections in a survey of 100 ARL respondents were unprocessed or uncataloged (1998; 2009 survey revealed no progress, maybe even worsening of situation)But it is more than that…
  6. 6. 1. The costs involved in maintaining/updating/researching bibliographic records, licensing costs (OCLC, vendor utility), personnel (salaries + benefits), and redundant work for ―local‖ practices in the print environment is no longer sustainable (the status quo).2. Users no longer think of the library (and the OPAC) as the first option for obtaining information; we are usually the last option, if an option at all.3. If (and when) the current economic crisis goes away, staffing within libraries will never go back to what they were.
  7. 7.  Eden, Bradford Lee. ―We can‘t wait any longer: managing long-term employees and organizational change.‖ The psychology of librarianship. Routledge 2012. Eden, Bradford Lee. ―The new user environment: the end of technical services?‖ Information Technology and Libraries (June 2010). Recent special issue of Cataloging & Classification Quarterly (v. 48, no. 6/7, 2010) titled 21st Century Metadata Operations: Challenges, Opportunities, Directions (book with same title and content just published by Routledge, 2011) Eden, Bradford Lee. ―Ending the Status Quo.‖ American Libraries; Mar 2008 (39:3) pg. 38. Eden, Bradford Lee. Information Organization Future for Libraries (Library technology reports, vol. 43, no. 6, November/December 2007).  See ―Reinventing the OPAC‖ section of this document for many papers/presentations on new roles for technical services staff. For a good overview of this topic, see the plethora of articles in Computers in Libraries, v. 27, no. 9 (October 2007) titled 21st-Century Library Systems. http://www.slideshare.net/smartbroad/crisis-or-opportunity-cataloging-catalogers- rda-and-change Diane Hillman presentation
  8. 8.  How many of you/your libraries are still doing copy cataloging? How many of you/your libraries still pay a vendor to display your data in a proprietary system? STOP, STOP, STOP!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! And SHAME on all of us!!!!!!!!!!!!!! (See NETSL presentation; library directors: a call to arms: where are you in all this. There is no reason why the majority of libraries should still be devoting staff resources, time, benefits to do local manipulation/review of hundreds of other library staffs’ descriptions of English language purchased print materials. Period. Library directors: if your AUL/Head of Technical Services hasn’t done this yet, do it for them. This is what is meant by being a leader. We need our scarce people/resources with their skill sets working in the unique resources/digital environment. Take down/shift whatever walls, fiefdoms, training needs that currently exist; get your tech services staff trained and moved from the print environment into unique resources/Special Collections and into born digital/digitization/your institutional repository work. Just do it!!!) (Sierra/Alma are proprietary clouds, sponsorships/donations to ALA events, receptions, etc.; open source/open platform/open cloud solutions like Koha, OCLC’s Web Scale Management Services, Blacklight, OLE; are you doing your jobs and looking at these; do you know about these?) WE are the ones holding ourselves back; WE are the ones stopping forward progress . We do not challenge ourselves, we do not innovate ourselves, and for a profession whose primary responsibility is information, we don’t even keep informed ourselves! About transformative, out-of-the-box, truly enlightening developments in technology, information, social media, and even the presentation of text and learning in different dimensional environments. Our users have been playing, learning, adapting, manipulating in 2D and 3D technologies for over 15 years now; why are libraries still caring about one-dimensional printed text display??!
  9. 9.  Reorganization towards the concept of collection services as comprising the entire process of creation, acquisition, description, access, and preservation of information Next on the cutting block: Reference services. Statistics prove they are not coming to us; are you going out to them? There isn’t anymore that can be wrung out of the backroom process We need to be risk-takers, not risk-adverse or even risk-thinkers, in order to remain viable and not become obsolete in this new information environment “Is it the next generation yet?” Martha Hruska (Technicalities v. 31, no. 4, July/August 2011) But as the discussing and rethinking go on, we continue to talktoo much among ourselves and not enough with all the other players inthe extended networked environment beyond libraries. While we talkamong ourselves, the world moves on, users move on, and by now we arenot exactly a new generation anymore… Time to Walk the Talk(examples)… and we need to start now.
  10. 10.  Published by University Leadership Council 2011 Main audience: ―The University Leadership Council provides provosts and academic administrators with expert advice and innovative strategies and practices—tested and proven to work by their peers at other universities across the country—for tackling their most pressing issues. Rather than reinventing the wheel, our members benefit from the learning of thousands of other universities facing the same challenges.‖ Have to look hard to find this document online Part I: Transformational change in the information landscape Part II: Managing the migration to digital information services Go to report itself
  11. 11. High profits for commercial publishers – or jobs for academics?For-profit scholarly publishers are enjoying these gifts of ours [journal articles and peer-reviewing services freely given away]. Commercial publishers areinvolved in publishing about half of the world‘s scholarly peer-reviewed journals. The profits, at least for the largest commercial publishers, are enormous and outof touch with the reality of academia. I am sure that we are all too familiar with the financial realities of academia today. If you look at the website of theAmerican Association of University Professors, you will see prominently posted a list of ―Financial Crisis FAQs‖, which state that the current challengingfinancial situation is being used to justify a number of measures that impact on academics, including ―hiring and salary freezes, furloughs, salary cuts, layoffs,nonrenewals, reduction and elimination of academic programs and colleges, revision of curricula, changes in academic policy, elimination of tenure, substantialchanges in workload, and more‖. In 2010, the UK announced that it would eliminate funding for humanities and social sciences teaching altogether, leaving theentire burden of education in these areas on the shoulders of students. I study at Simon Fraser University in Canada, where a couple of years ago we axed theCanadian Studies department.The for-profit scholarly publishing sector is not at all sharing in this misfortune. The largest companies – Reed Elsevier, Springer, Wiley, informa.plc (alsoknown as Taylor & Francis), all reported profits in the range of 30-40% in their latest financial statements. Wiley reported a 13% growth in profitsover last year at this time, for a 42% profit level. To picture just how high this profit level is, compare this with what you are likely seeing in your personalinvestments. A bank‘s interest on your savings account is probably a lot closer to .0036% than to 36%, the profit rate that Elsevier recently posted. This is aninelastic market. It doesn‘t matter if many of the people who are doing the largest share of the work – doing the research, writing up the results, doing the peerreview – are losing some of their jobs and bits of their salaries, or if the universities that are, by far, the major part of the customer base for these companies arefacing extremely challenging financial times. These things don‘t impact the bottom line, at all. Another way to express this is that for these for-profit companies,their CEOs and their shareholders – to whom we give our life‘s work – it fundamentally does not matter whether we have work to live.ReferencesAmerican Association of University Professors. 2011. Financial Crisis FAQs. Retrieved October 5, 2011 from http://www.aaup.org/aaup/financial/mainpage.htmElsevier profits: Economist (2011). Of goats and headaches: One of the best media businesses is also one of the most resented. Retrieved September 25, 2011from http://www.economist.com/node/18744177/Informa plc. (2011). Half year results for the six months ended 30 June 2011. Retrieved September 25, 2011 from http://www.informa.com/Investor-relations/John Wiley & Sons. (2011). John Wiley & Sons reports first quarter fiscal year 2012 results. Retrieved fromhttp://ca.wiley.com.proxy.lib.sfu.ca/WileyCDA/PressRelease/pressReleaseId-100853.htmlSpringer Science + Business Media. (2010). Annual report. Retrieved September 25, 2011 fromhttp://www.springer.com/about+springer/company+information/annual+report?SGWID=0-175705-0-0-0This is a snippet from an early draft of Chapter 2 of my thesis, tentatively called Freedom for scholarship in the internet age, combined with speaking notes frommy talk, Information feudalism or knowledge for all, at the Association of Internet Researchers Conference, Seattle, October 2011. I am planning to release moredetailed version(s) in the near future.This post is part of the Transitioning to open access series.
  12. 12. From ―Ahead of the Storm: Research Libraries and the Future of the ResearchUniversity‖http://publications.arl.org/rli276/21. Understand the mission, distinctive strengths, and vulnerabilities of your organization and the programs you lead within them.2. Develop goals and targets to build on and sustain these distinctive strengths and to overcome or reshape vulnerabilities.3. Benchmark your progress and strategies against peers; locally, nationally, and internationally. Increasingly, to have an impact locally, to forge a distinctive contribution and reputation, depends on national and international profile, relevance, and quality.4. Understand, value, and develop your talent. There is no substitute.5. Network to create share value, to gain knowledge and experience.6. Don‘t play it safe. This fosters mediocrity, which, in a competitive environment, leads to decay. Leave plenty of room to take risks.
  13. 13. Understand, value, and develop your talent. There is nosubstitute.Don’t play it safe. This fosters mediocrity, which, in acompetitive environment, leads to decay. Leave plenty ofroom to take risks.From ―Taking Stock and Making Hay: Archival Collections Assessment‖Merrilee Proffitt (OCLC, July 2011 report)http://www.oclc.org/research/publications/library/2011/2011-07r.htm―In a world that is increasingly shaped by the view that ‗if it isn‘t online it doesn‘texist,‘ digitization of special collections material is – or should be – at or near thetop of our priority list.‖
  14. 14. From UC NGTS Phase 2 ELCMS TF Report (September 2010): Stop checking in print serials; but one campus should track carefully to ensure receipt for UC. This speaks to a centralized model for serials (see Rick Andersons recent writings). Stop binding print journals. More centralized serials record maintenance (both the record and the process); too much redundancy in serials work across the campuses. Stop local customization of bibliographic records (catalog at the network level). Stop having SCP distribute bibliographic records for downloading into local OPACs. Stop having the concept of full records for everything. Need a more trimmed-down, ―good enough‖ record standard. Stop having separate local ILSs and rely on NGM as the UC Libraries union catalog.
  15. 15.  Spending more time on collections that are currently uncataloged, undescribed, and have little to no bibliographic access whatsoever: special collections, digitization and digital projects, data sets, etc. Share responsibility across UC for eliminating cataloging backlogs. Redeployment/retooling of scarce human resources, especially technical services staff, away from description/organization of print, to description/organization of digital/unique resources. Training in and assistance with digitization and digital projects scanning would also be appropriate at many campuses. The implementation of a “good enough” bibliographic record standard for all resources is critical to this redeployment of personnel. Doing all bibliographic work at the network rather than the local level. Considering the life cycle of all resources and formats, from research to creation to access to preservation.
  16. 16. Taken from the LAUC report to the LAUC Committee on Professional Governance:Collection Development: Meet demand for library and/or subject expertise from outside the individual library  applies to systemwide subject specialists, as well as faculty and graduate students  This means specialized subject expertise will be in higher demand than ever before and the expert bibliographer may serve at the systemwide level Select materials for local repositories, hard copy storage or digital  requires close collaboration with faculty and other subject specialists Write grant proposals  requires special skill and training as well as knowledge of campus (or systemwide or national) grant offices and bodies Work with library and campus staff on digital projects  requires collaboration, organization and technical skill Find those elusive materials that meet deeper and broader research needs and distinguish your local collection from others  requires a deep knowledge of your local or special collection Provide reference service, both in-person and digital  requires subject, technical expertise and people skills Teach critical thinking and information literacy skills  requires both subject and teaching expertise Solve e-resource access and discovery issues  requires a high level of technical expertise Review consortial packages for usage and renewal
  17. 17. Reference/Instruction: The reference and instruction librarian is positioned where the library meets its users, and functions as the eyes and ears of the organization. Without the personal embodied response of the reference and instruction librarian, the library becomes impersonal and disconnected from its community. Reference and instruction librarianship requires enhanced conversation skills. Librarians must be able to  strike and maintain a rapport in whatever medium of communication the reference interaction occurs  demonstrate empathy, curiosity and enthusiasm for diverse research topics and populations.  help patrons become more efficient, confident and enthusiastic about the research experience. Librarians need to keep current with changes in the research process, including  topic formation, literature review, citation management, the search for in-depth analysis and need for a wide variety of types and formats of information.  the increasing interdisciplinarity of research  Currency is best maintained through practice: thus librarians should undertake their own research to be better equipped to serve the academic clientele. Instruction and research assistance are complementary skills.  Reference and instruction librarians must understand what instructors are using their assignments to teach. By understanding the intention of an assignment, the librarian can better help prepare the student to learn from the course experience.  The librarian should work with faculty to modify and develop research assignments that foster the desired learning.  Reference and instruction librarians must treat their patrons as life-long learners, communicating knowledge and skills that transcend a particular question, subject or major. Reference and instruction librarians need to understand how patrons engage the information world.  The reference and instruction librarian must see the world through the patron‘s eyes, so he or she can make contextual sense of the question, identify points of confusion, and then work with the patron to find solutions.  Librarians need to know the discourse of the clients they serve, developing and maintaining their own subject expertise to this end. The reference and instruction librarian should be a vital consult in a variety of institutional decisions and projects, including space planning, technical services and collection development.  Reference and collection development are complementary tasks: integration of these two areas of librarianship is increasingly important as library staffs will likely remain small in the future.  Librarians with reference and instruction skills must contribute to the development of easily navigable systems of discovery.  The reference and instruction librarian, embedded in the University community, is well positioned to manage library initiatives and ongoing projects. In turn, management experience benefits public service, by aligning problems solving techniques with systemic solutions and reinforcing the creative bond between a librarian‘s day-to-day work and the institution‘s identity.
  18. 18. Technical Services:1. Increased management responsibilities: Project managers  cross-functional leadership  integrate efforts with collection and public services librarians to identify collection/digitization priorities Product managers  efficiency and sustainability  workflow management: More Product, Less Process  good-enough standard  balance between quality and efficiency  manage lifecycle between acquisition to digitization to usage  Digitization must become part of the workflow of collection services.  achieve economies of scale in digitization projects Managers of a multi-generational environment  Traditionalists  Baby boomers  Generation X  Generation Y  Millennials Creators of a peer-to-peer technical support/knowledge base
  19. 19. Technical Services (continued)2. Technical services evolving into collection services: It is no longer enough to provide discovery tools; librarians must now provide access to collections, moving from technical services to collection services.  NGTS calls for librarians to ―systematically digitize high-use, high-priority collections for access‖ (NGTS New Modes Final Report p. 2).  Broader knowledge and understanding of information technology, Archivists‘ Toolkit, licensing, digitization standards and processes, collection priorities, user information-seeking behavior and end- user needs, modes of access, and emerging technologies will be required.  meet user expectations that content is accessible online, not just merely discoverable online  Technical services/collection services librarian has larger role in providing actual content in addition to providing discovery tools  shift towards users directly engaging with online content with less mediation, so role of newly defined collection services librarian gains importance  curatorial role  more fully integrated in defining selection criteria for digitization priorities  grant writing: pursue funding to subsidize mass conversion of remaining legacy print finding aids, etc.  paradigm shift in approaches to processing collections (good-enough standard, focus on accessibility, reducing redundancy across campuses)  concerted efforts to give unique archival collections in backlogs collection-level records – providing access to hidden collections  knowledge of encoding standards (EAD, MARC XML)  knowledge of Digital Asset Management System (DAMS)  born-digital assets: librarians as partners engaged in the creation of digital content that requires ongoing management and long-term stewardship  data sets: acquire, provide access and manage them
  20. 20. Technical Services (continue)3. Bridge builders: Bridge builders who can inspire buy-in from stakeholders and find meaningful ways to leverage and transition legacy skill-sets of current-generation librarians into needs and strategic priorities of next-generation librarians  build bridges across generations Bridge building with campus stakeholders outside of library Bridge building across campuses Systemwide training Systemwide projects4. Global thinkers:  Task-focused linear thinkers will need to learn how to also be global thinkers.
  21. 21. Professional Governance/Organizational Culture: Willingness to adapt to rapidly evolving job duties both at our home campuses and systemwide Broader thinking about shared governance and management objectives in regard to shared systemwide services, responsibilities, and resources Ability to develop and maintain collegial relationships with systemwide colleagues and research stakeholders, both in-person and through remote communication tools Awareness of the impact of systemwide activities and how they translate to the operational level at each campus Differentiating between campus-level and systemwide responsibility for services and responsibilities, and understanding that the differentiation will be fluid in the near term Ability to market services and resources to a diverse clientele Ability to communicate complicated information succinctly to stakeholders and university officials
  22. 22. What Will Kill Our Profession Is Not Ebooks, Amazon Or Google, But A Lack Of Imagination
  23. 23. http://kcoyle.net/presentations/lita2011.html The Message (her conclusion) Weve got to move beyond the catalog. It is not longer an end in itself, and it is no longer a primary user service. Yes, we need the metadata that describes our holdings and our licensed resources, but this inventory isnt for our users but is fodder for services that will be used in a larger information environment. It needs to be like the OpenURL server database that sits between information resources on the network and the library user. This also means that FRBR and RDA will have to evolve. The catalog that they address, that they create, is no longer serving our users. Our data needs to focus on making connections outside of the library that will bring library resources to users as they interact with the world of information. Those connections cant be limited to connecting to the names of authors and titles, or to works and manifestations, but absolutely have to have a knowledge organization component. In fact, our main emphasis should be on knowledge organization, quite the opposite of where we are today.
  24. 24. Not what you/your library holds or can access that everyone elsein the world already has, but what you have that is unique,distinctive, sets you apart from everyone else in this newinformation environmentAnd for most of us, that is our special collections/archivesSo…What are YOU doing about it??
  25. 25. Getting away from what we need to do, know, plan, change…To how we should be reacting, feeling, taking charge, and emotionallydirecting our response to all of this at the individual level…That is, the bigger picture beyond our jobs…It all comes down to ATTITUDE and PERCEPTION, because when pushcomes to shove, it is YOUR PERCEPTION that is REALITY…
  26. 26. http://www.selfgrowth.com/selfimprovementnewsletters.htmlSelf-Improvement Newsletter“How to Lose it and Never Miss a Beat” August 2011 (Lost house in fire)So how do we get conscious and take control?Take 100% responsibility for your life. At the end of the day, it doesnt matter whos fault it is.What are you going to do about it? Abdicating responsibility doesnt get you off the hook formaking something happen. Instead, it renders you powerless and a victim.Get clear about what you want. Just like ancient mariners used the compass to maintain directionduring storms, your clearly defined objectives point the way forward when all hell breaks loose.You can steer yourself to clear waters instead of getting dashed against the rocks.Purposely look for opportunities. To build your unshakable mindset, youll need a little practice.When you are clear about what you want, consciously look for ways to get closer. Soon enough,youll retrain your brain to show you the best path through.Pay attention to your dominant emotions. When life strikes, are you drawn to finding blame or tocorrecting your course? I dont mean for anyone to ignore the emotions that pull us back, but dontgive them all of your power. Grieve, mourn, get angry...but then bring your emotional awarenessback to possibility.An alternative to taking conscious control of your mindset is to allow the world at-large toshape it for you. Any takers? Ok then, make the decision now, that you are in control of yourlife and events will no longer kick the chair out from under you.Soon, your mind will begin to do the sifting and sorting for you, leaving you free to act on the newopportunities that you never knew were there before.
  27. 27. “Want Real World Change? Stop Complaining” (August 2011)If you really want to change your life and help build a better world for yourself and others, youmight want to consider this little piece of advice: stop complaining.You dont have to travel far these days to come across this crippling habit -- theres plenty of peoplefussing about the government, banks, large corporations and how theyre bilking us out of every dollarwe have.Youll hear these conversations almost daily and the theme is usually the same: They ‗done me wrongand they need to fix it.Its true that the short-term payoff for this type of conversation is rich. We get some attention, feelengaged, connected and, at times, even powerful. We also get to enjoy that delicious feeling of beingright.Just like eating fast food every day, the long-term cost of participating in such conversations eventuallyoutweighs the perceived short-term benefits. We unconsciously create a feeling of despair andhopelessness.We also stay trapped in the illusion that by talking about the problem were somehow contributingto fixing it. The reality is were just reinforcing it.If we truly want change, we must turn our attention away from the problem and direct it towardthe solution. This can be a difficult task, though, if we continue to feel victimized and harbor feelings ofresentment and anger.Our first step, while a challenging one, is to acknowledge that we have in some way contributed tothe results we complain about.We have the power to uncreate this mess or even better, create something entirely new. Our feelingsof hopelessness and despair will turn into feelings of empowerment and strength. We are no longerhelpless victims of the system.In order to create that kind of positive change, we must first be willing to be accountable toourselves and each other. Only then can we proactively change the conditions we used to complainabout.
  28. 28.  Article: 4 Emotions that can Lead to Life Change - By Jim Rohn (October 24, 2011) Emotions are the most powerful forces inside us. Under the power of emotions, human beings can perform the most heroic (as well as barbaric) acts. To a great degree, civilization itself can be defined as the intelligent channeling of human emotion. Emotions are fuel and the mind is the pilot, which together propel the ship of civilized progress. Which emotions cause people to act? There are four basic ones; each, or a combination of several, can trigger the most incredible activity. The day that you allow these emotions to fuel your desire is the day youll turn your life around. 1) DISGUST One does not usually equate the word "disgust" with positive action. And yet properly channeled, disgust can change a persons life. The person who feels disgusted has reached a point of no return. He or she is ready to throw down the gauntlet at life and say, "Ive had it!" Thats what I said after many humiliating experiences at age 25, I said. "I dont want to live like this anymore. Ive had it with being broke. Ive had it with being embarrassed, and Ive had it with lying." Yes, productive feelings of disgust come when a person says, "Enough is enough." The "guy" has finally had it with mediocrity. Hes had it with those awful sick feelings of fear, pain and humiliation. He then decides he is not going to live like this anymore." Look out! This could be the day that turns a life around. Call it what you will, the "Ive had it" day, the "never again" day, the "enoughs enough" day. Whatever you call it, its powerful! There is nothing so life-changing as gut- wrenching disgust! 2) DECISION Most of us need to be pushed to the wall to make decisions. And once we reach this point, we have to deal with the conflicting emotions that come with making them. We have reached a fork in the road. Now this fork can be a two-prong, three-prong, or even a four-prong fork. No wonder that decision-making can create knots in stomachs, keep us awake in the middle of the night, or make us break out in a cold sweat. Making life-changing decisions can be likened to internal civil war. Conflicting armies of emotions, each with its own arsenal of reasons, battle each other for supremacy of our minds. And our resulting decisions, whether bold or timid, well thought out or impulsive, can either set the course of action or blind it. I dont have much advice to give you about decision-making except this: Whatever you do, dont camp at the fork in the road. Decide. Its far better to make a wrong decision than to not make one at all. Each of us must confront our emotional turmoil and sort out our feelings.
  29. 29.  3) DESIRE How does one gain desire? I dont think I can answer this directly because there are many ways. But I do know two things about desire: a. It comes from the inside not the outside. b. It can be triggered by outside forces. Almost anything can trigger desire. Its a matter of timing as much as preparation. It might be a song that tugs at the heart. It might be a memorable sermon. It might be a movie, a conversation with a friend, a confrontation with the enemy, or a bitter experience. Even a book or an article such as this one can trigger the inner mechanism that will make some people say, "I want it now!" Therefore, while searching for your "hot button" of pure, raw desire, welcome into your life each positive experience. Dont erect a wall to protect you from experiencing life. The same wall that keeps out your disappointment also keeps out the sunlight of enriching experiences. So let life touch you. The next touch could be the one that turns your life around. 4) RESOLVE Resolve says, "I will." These two words are among the most potent in the English language. I WILL. Benjamin Disraeli, the great British statesman, once said, "Nothing can resist a human will that will stake even its existence on the extent of its purpose." In other words, when someone resolves to "do or die," nothing can stop him. The mountain climber says, "I will climb the mountain. Theyve told me its too high, its too far, its too steep, its too rocky, its too difficult. But its my mountain. I will climb it. Youll soon see me waving from the top or youll never see me, because unless I reach the peak, Im not coming back." Who can argue with such resolve? When confronted with such iron-will determination, I can see Time, Fate and Circumstance calling a hasty conference and deciding, "We might as well let him have his dream. Hes said hes going to get there or die trying." The best definition for "resolve" Ive ever heard came from a schoolgirl in Foster City, California. As is my custom, I was lecturing about success to a group of bright kids at a junior high school. I asked, "Who can tell me what "resolve" means?" Several hands went up, and I did get some pretty good definitions. But the last was the best. A shy girl from the back of the room got up and said with quiet intensity, "I think resolve means promising yourself you will never give up." Thats it! Thats the best definition Ive ever heard: PROMISE YOURSELF YOULL NEVER GIVE UP. Think about it! How long should a baby try to learn how to walk? How long would you give the average baby before you say, "Thats it, youve had your chance"? You say thats crazy? Of course it is. Any mother would say, "My baby is going to keep trying until he learns how to walk!" No wonder everyone walks. There is a vital lesson in this. Ask yourself, "How long am I going to work to make my dreams come true?" I suggest you answer, "As long as it takes." Thats what these four emotions are all about.
  30. 30.  *** Article: Top 10 Traits of Highly Successful People - That You Can Learn! - By Dr. Philip E. Humbert *** Or Top Ten Traits of Highly Successful Librarians and Library Staff 1. They work hard! Yes, they play hard, too! They get up early, they rarely complain, they expect performance from others, but they expect extraordinary performance from themselves. Repeated, high-level success starts with a recognition that hard work pays off. 2. They are incredibly curious and eager to learn. They study, ask questions and read - constantly! An interesting point, however: While most of them did well in school, the difference is that they apply or take advantage of what they learn. Repeated success is not about memorizing facts, its about being able to take information and create, build, or apply it in new and important ways. Successful people want to learn everything about everything! 3. They network. They know lots of people, and they know lots of different kinds of people. They listen to friends, neighbors, co-workers and bartenders. They dont have to be "the life of the party", in fact many are quiet, even shy, but they value people and they value relationships. Successful people have a rolodex full of people who value their friendship and return their calls. 4. They work on themselves and never quit! While the "over-night wonders" become arrogant and quickly disappear, really successful people work on their personality, their leadership skills, management skills, and every other detail of life. When a relationship or business deal goes sour, they assume they can learn from it and they expect to do better next time. Successful people dont tolerate flaws; they fix them! 5. They are extraordinarily creative. They go around asking, "Why not?" They see new combinations, new possibilities, new opportunities and challenges where others see problems or limitations. They wake up in the middle of the night yelling, "Ive got it!" They ask for advice, try things out, consult experts and amateurs, always looking for a better, faster, cheaper solution. Successful people create stuff! 6. They are self-reliant and take responsibility. Incredibly successful people dont worry about blame, and they dont waste time complaining. They make decisions and move on. Sometimes they are criticized for taking this to extremes - Jimmy Carter carried his own briefcase and a President "shouldnt" do that! Extremely successful people take the initiative and accept the responsibilities of success. 7. They are usually relaxed and keep their perspective. Even in times of stress or turmoil, highly successful people keep their balance, they know the value of timing, humor, and patience. They rarely panic or make decisions on impulse. Unusually successful people breathe easily, ask the right questions, and make sound decisions, even in a crisis. 8. Extremely successful people live in the present moment. They know that "Now" is the only time they can control. They have a "gift" for looking people in the eye, listening to what is being said, enjoying a meal or fine wine, music or playing with a child. They never seem rushed, and they get a lot done! They take full advantage of each day. Successful people dont waste time, they use it! 9. They "look over the horizon" to see the future. They observe trends, notice changes, see shifts, and hear the nuances that others miss. A basketball player wearing Nikes is trivial, the neighbor kid wearing them is interesting, your own teenager demanding them is an investment opportunity! Extremely successful people live in the present, with one eye on the future! 10. Repeatedly successful people respond instantly! When an investment isnt working out, they sell. When they see an opportunity, they make the call. If an important relationship is cooling down, they take time to renew it. When technology or a new competitor or a change in the economic situation requires an adjustment, they are the first and quickest to respond. These traits work together in combination, giving repeatedly successful people a huge advantage. Because they are insatiable learners, they can respond wisely to change. Because their personal relationships are strong, they have good advisors, and a reserve of goodwill when things go bad. And finally, none of these traits are genetic! They can be learned! They are free and they are skills you can use. Start now!
  31. 31. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/joe-robinson/living-a-meaningful-life_b_908263.html Intrinsic motivation. Pursuing and enjoying experiences off the clock takes a different motivation than the work reflex of external results: intrinsic motivation. You do it for the inherent interest, fun, learning or challenge. Research shows we enjoy what we do and remember much more of it (critical to memory, which is what tells you that you like your life or not) when the goal is intrinsic. Expect no payoff, and you get a big one, internal gratification. Initiating. Instead of being told what to do or watching others doing the living, we have to break out of spectator mode and self-determine our lives to feel gratified. We need to research and plan activities and vacations, seek out and try new things, invite others to get out and participate -- and if they dont reciprocate, go alone. Risk-taking. The real risk is not risking. Security is a red flag for the brain, which is built to seek out novelty and challenge. Make the risk intrinsic (the result doesnt matter), and youre able to venture much more because, instead of having anything on the line, youre just exploring. Pursuit of competence. Since competence is one of your core needs, its a handy thing to build and sublime to feel. The idea here is that you want to get better at something -- not to show off, not for anyone else but for your own gratification. Pursuing competence leads you to build your skills at an activity to the point where it can become a passion. Its a fabulous self- and life-sustaining skill. Attention-directing and absorption. The work mind wants to get everything over with ASAP. The key to optimal experiences is being 100 percent engaged in what youre doing now. That means losing the electronic devices and distractions and putting all your concentration on the activity at hand. The more absorbed you are, the more your thoughts and deeds are the same, and the happier you are. Its called harmony. Going for the experience. Observation and hanging back dont satisfy the engagement mandate of your brain neurons. To activate a fulfilling life, we have to participate in the 40 percent of our potential happiness (the rest is inherited or due to circumstance) we can actually do something about -- intentional activities. Thats the realm of experience. Experiences make us happier than material things because they cant be compared with anyone elses experience. They dont lose value through social comparison. They are personal events that engage our self-determination needs.
  32. 32. Buddhist quote: ―Lean into your discomfort‖―Work to live, not the other way around‖ (in other words, don‘t ―live to work‖)―Always leave enough time in your life to do something that makes you happy, satisfied, even joyous. That has more of an effect on economic well-being than any other single factor.‖ Paul Hawken"I used to think that my success was based on 95% processes and techniques, and about 5% on my mindset. As I have moved through life, I eventually found that this formula was all wrong. 95% of your success is based on your mindset and attitude, and only 5% on learning processes and techniques.‖When you are interested, you do what is convenient. When you are committed, you do whatever is necessary.YOUR LIFE IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN YOUR WORK, AND YOUR WORK IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN YOUR JOB.Library administrators, in these tough budget times, are looking for staff members who maintain a positive attitude towards change and life, who are willing to grow and learn both professionally and personally, to work ―outside their comfort zone‖ and ―outside the box‖ when it comes to helping the library to fulfill its mission and goals.Will you be one of these?
  33. 33. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NZCMkAB875I&feature=related

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