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The Healthy Heart Study: Using online and mobile risk
calculators to improve cardiovascular disease prevention
Carissa Bon...
The problem

› CVD prevention guidelines advocate the use of absolute risk 1
› Clinicians report difficulties communicatin...
The approach
› Study 1: Qualitative think aloud study of online calculators
› Study 2: Experiment to test components of on...
Study 1: Results of think aloud study

www.heartagecalculator.com
4
Study 1: Results of think aloud study

www.knowyournumbers.co.nz
5
Study 1: Results of think aloud study
EXPECTATIONS
Specific knowledge

General knowledge

EXPERIENCE
Unexpected info =
neg...
Study 2: Development of online experiment
Example: 50 year old male smoker with
raised blood pressure and cholesterol
Your...
Study 3: Development of app experiment

8
Collaboration

› What can we offer? Our team has expertise in:
- Psychology: risk communication, decision making, behaviou...
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The healthy heart study: using online and mobile risk calculators to improve cardiovascular disease prevention. Carissa Bonner, School of Public Health, University of Sydney

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The healthy heart study: using online and mobile risk calculators to improve cardiovascular disease prevention. Carissa Bonner, School of Public Health, University of Sydney

  1. 1. The Healthy Heart Study: Using online and mobile risk calculators to improve cardiovascular disease prevention Carissa Bonner, PhD Candidate Supervisors: Kirsten McCaffery, Jesse Jansen, Les Irwig, Ben Newell Collaborators: Shannon McKinn, Jenny Doust, Paul Glasziou, Armando Teixeira-Pinto, Haryana Dhillon Funding: National Health & Medical Research Council, Heart Foundation The Healthy Heart Study Screening and Test Evaluation Program (STEP) Sydney School of Public Health
  2. 2. The problem › CVD prevention guidelines advocate the use of absolute risk 1 › Clinicians report difficulties communicating absolute risk 2 › Probabilistic information is poorly understood by patients and clinicians 3 › Early research suggests that heart age may be more effective 4 1. Ferket BS, et al. Systematic review of guidelines on cardiovascular risk assessment which recommendations should clinicians follow for a cardiovascular health check? Arch Intern Med 2010;170:27 2. Bonner C, et al. General Practitioners' use of different assessment strategies in cardiovascular disease prevention: a qualitative study. Med J Aust 2013; 99:485 3. Visschers V, et al. Probability information in risk communication: A review of the research literature. Risk Analysis 2009;29:267 4. Soureti A, et al. Evaluation of a cardiovascular disease risk assessment tool for the promotion of healthier lifestyles. Eur J Cardiovascular Prev Rehab 2010;17:519 2
  3. 3. The approach › Study 1: Qualitative think aloud study of online calculators › Study 2: Experiment to test components of online calculator › Study 3: Experiment to test components of app calculator 3
  4. 4. Study 1: Results of think aloud study www.heartagecalculator.com 4
  5. 5. Study 1: Results of think aloud study www.knowyournumbers.co.nz 5
  6. 6. Study 1: Results of think aloud study EXPECTATIONS Specific knowledge General knowledge EXPERIENCE Unexpected info = negative reaction Expected info = positive reaction EVALUATION Low credibility High credibility ACTION Reject results See GP for assessment Consider lifestyle change Apply to others Increased knowledge Changed risk perception
  7. 7. Study 2: Development of online experiment Example: 50 year old male smoker with raised blood pressure and cholesterol Your risk of a cardiovascular event in the next 5 years is 11%. If you stopped smoking and had lower levels of cholesterol and blood pressure, your risk would be 3%. Your heart age is 74, 24 years older than you. If you stopped smoking and had lower levels of cholesterol and blood pressure, your heart age would be 50, the same as your current age. 7
  8. 8. Study 3: Development of app experiment 8
  9. 9. Collaboration › What can we offer? Our team has expertise in: - Psychology: risk communication, decision making, behaviour change, health literacy and numeracy - Public health: screening, clinical practice guidelines, older adults - Mixed methods: qualitative, experimental, intervention RCT, epidemiology › What do we need? We would like to talk to experts in: - The use of mobile apps for recruitment and as interventions - The development of interactive graphics - Online health information seeking carissa.bonner@sydney.edu.au 9

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