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Time management for supervisors - principles, tools and practice

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Time management tools, techniques, principles and best practice

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Time management for supervisors - principles, tools and practice

  1. 1. TIME MANAGEMENT FOR SUPERVISORS – PRINCIPLES, TOOLS AND PRACTICE CHARLES COTTER PhD, MBA, B.A (Hons), B.A www.slideshare.net/CharlesCotter AUGUST 2018
  2. 2. 2-DAY TRAINING PROGRAMME OVERVIEW • Introduction and Preview of training • Diagnosis: Effective utilization of time • Applying time management principles • Identifying and combatting time wasters – self-generated and environmental • Benefits of effective time management – personal and organizational • Consequences of poor time management e.g. stress
  3. 3. 2-DAY TRAINING PROGRAMME OVERVIEW • Applying time management tools and techniques • Video clip: Applying the R-A-C technique • Personal Effectiveness ❑The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People ❑Work-Life Balance ❑Assertiveness • Case Study: “Who’s got the Monkey” • Conclusion
  4. 4. TIME MANAGEMENT
  5. 5. AGREE OR DISAGREE? WHY?
  6. 6. INTRODUCTORY LEARNING ACTIVITY • Individual activity: • Complete the following statement by inserting one word only. In order to effectively manage time in the NWU work environment, I need to/to be……………………………………………………… • Jot this word down and find other learners who have written down the same word. • Write this word down on the flip-chart. • You’ll be given the opportunity to substantiate your choice of word.
  7. 7. How competent are you as a (time management) pilot?
  8. 8. LEARNING ACTIVITY 1 • Individual activity: • In your capacity as a supervisor, complete the personal time management evaluation survey below and refer to the score interpretation on page 10. • Refer to the time analysis of the 5 time management principles.
  9. 9. LEARNING ACTIVITY 1 • Time analysis • Principles: • #1: Goal Setting (Questions 6, 10, 14, 15) • #2: Prioritization (Questions 1, 4, 8, 9, 13, 14, 15) • #3: Managing Interruptions (Questions 5, 9, 11, 12) • #4: Procrastination (Questions 2, 10, 12) • #5: Scheduling (Questions 3, 7, 12) • Identify gaps and/or improvement areas.
  10. 10. APPLYING THE PARETO PRINCIPLE (80/20%)
  11. 11. AVOID PROCRASTINATION
  12. 12. SUMMARY: TIME MANAGEMENT PRINCIPLES
  13. 13. SELF-GENERATED TIME WASTERS • Personnel factors • Disorganized • Procrastination • Inability to say no • Burnout and stress
  14. 14. ENVIRONMENTAL TIME WASTERS • Organizational factors • Organizational Cultural factors • Management factors • Top management • Work processes, procedures & habits • Supply chain • Unproductive meetings
  15. 15. CRITERIA FOR EFFECTIVE MEETINGS • Effective meetings really boil down to three things: ❑They achieve the meeting's objective ❑They take up a minimum amount of time ❑They leave participants feeling that a sensible process has been followed • If you structure your meeting planning, preparation, execution and follow up around these three basic criteria, the result will be an effective meeting.
  16. 16. USING TIME WISELY • To ensure you cover only what needs to be covered and you stick to relevant activities, you need to create an agenda. • To prepare an agenda, consider the following factors: ❑Priorities – what absolutely must be covered? ❑Results – what do need to accomplish at the meeting? ❑Participants – who needs to attend the meeting for it to be successful? ❑Sequence – in what order will you cover the topics? ❑Timing – how much time will spend on each topic? ❑Date and Time – when will the meeting take place? ❑Place – where will the meeting take place?
  17. 17. USING TIME WISELY • The meeting secretary can then look at the information that should be prepared beforehand. What do the participants need to know in order to make the most of the meeting time? • What role are they expected to perform in the meeting, so that they can do the right preparation? • If it's a meeting to solve a problem, ask the participants to come prepared with a viable solution. If you are discussing an on-going project, have each participant summarize his or her progress to date and circulate the reports amongst members. • Assigning a particular topic of discussion to various people is another great way to increase involvement and interest. On the agenda, indicate who will lead the discussion or presentation of each item.
  18. 18. USING TIME WISELY • Use your agenda as your time guide. When you notice that time is running out for a particular item, consider hurrying the discussion, pushing to a decision, deferring discussion until another time, or assigning it for discussion by a subcommittee. • An important aspect of running effective meetings is insisting that everyone respects the time allotted. Start the meeting on time, do not spend time recapping for latecomers, and, when you can, finish on time. • Whatever can be done outside the meeting time should be. This includes circulating reports for people to read beforehand, and assigning smaller group meetings to discuss issues relevant to only certain people.
  19. 19. COMMON TYPES OF STRESS • Anticipatory stress • Situational stress • Encounter stress • Time stress
  20. 20. MANAGING TIME STRESS • Learn good time management skills e.g. To-Do Lists and/or Action Programs • Make sure that you're devoting enough time to your important priorities. Your important tasks are usually the ones that will help you reach your goals and working on these projects is a better use of your time. Prioritization helps you separate tasks that you need to focus on from those you can safely put off. • If you often feel that you don't have enough time to complete all of your tasks, learn how to create more time in your day e.g. managing your energy cycles and peak-time management • Also, make sure that you're polite, but assertive about saying “no” to tasks that you don't have the capacity to do
  21. 21. OUTCOMES OF STRESS
  22. 22. T - TIME MANAGEMENT • Good organization gives us significant control over the amount and degree of stress we experience, and good time management helps us accomplish the goals we consider to be the most important in life. • Learn how to use S-M-A-R-T goals and a P-D-A- L (Prioritized Daily Action List) to keep your life and time on track.
  23. 23. INDIVIDUAL STRESS MANAGEMENT STRATEGIES
  24. 24. LEARNING ACTIVITY 2 • Group Discussion: • In your capacity as a supervisor, identify the five (5) foremost time wasters – both self- generated and environmental – in the NWU working environment. • Apply appropriate time management principles to address these time wasters.
  25. 25. LEARNING ACTIVITY 2 • Group Discussion: • List the benefits of effective time management that will accrue as a result of minimizing these time wasters, with the appropriate tools/techniques. • In your capacity as a supervisor, describe how you can counteract and/or mitigate the consequences of poor time management, in particular, the adverse effects of heightened levels of stress.
  26. 26. TIME MANAGEMENT TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES • Time and activity management log/audit • Compiling a To-Do list • Prioritize your time (ABC) • Applying the delegation process • Scheduling • Other practical time management techniques
  27. 27. TIME AND ACTIVITY MANAGEMENT LOG/AUDIT
  28. 28. LEARNING ACTIVITY 3 • Video clip exercise: • View the 4-minute, Wellcast YouTube video clip. Refer to the link https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V Uk6LXRZMMk • Make notes (for post-viewing discussion) on the following key points: • Record: • Analyze: • Change:
  29. 29. COMPILING A TO-DO LIST • Daily register of intended tasks/activities to be completed. • Productivity and time management can be measured at the end of the day by using the To-Do List as a check-list of accomplishment. • This will invariably lead to improved levels of accountability and productivity. • If you use To-Do Lists, you will ensure that: ❑ You remember to carry out all necessary tasks ❑ You tackle the most important jobs first, and do not waste time on trivial tasks. ❑ You do not get stressed by a large number of unimportant jobs.
  30. 30. URGENCY/IMPORTANCE MATRIX
  31. 31. PRACTICE THE 4 D’s
  32. 32. DEFINITION OF DELEGATION AND OBJECTIVES THEREOF • Definition: To delegate means to allocate work i.e. a supervisor passing on authority to a team member to execute a task on behalf of the former. Work to be delegated ranges from routine tasks to managerial activities. • The objectives of delegation are to: ❑ Distribute work ❑ Develop staff ❑ Establish the legality of official action ❑ Save managerial time • The most obvious reason for delegation is that one person cannot do all the work i.e. fair and equitable division of labour. • The overall objective of delegation is to develop efficiency by means of streamlining work processes and utilizing staff and time more effectively.
  33. 33. RESPONSIBILITY, AUTHORITY AND ACCOUNTABILITY
  34. 34. DELEGATION PROCESS
  35. 35. DECIDING WHAT JOBS TO DELEGATE?
  36. 36. LEARNING ACTIVITY 4 • Group Discussion: • Identify one supervisory/manage ment task in the NWU working environment. With the objective of saving time, explain how you will apply the 5-step delegation process.
  37. 37. SCHEDULING • Scheduling is the process by which you look at the time available to you, and plan how you will use it to achieve the goals you have identified. • Scheduling is a five-step process: ❑Identify the time you have available. ❑Block in the essential tasks you must carry out to succeed in your job. Schedule in high priority urgent tasks and vital "house-keeping" activities. ❑Block in appropriate contingency time to handle unpredictable interruptions. ❑In the time that remains, schedule the activities that address your priorities and personal goals. ❑If you have little or no discretionary time left by the time you reach step five, then revisit the assumptions you have made in steps one to four.
  38. 38. OTHER TIME MANAGEMENT PRACTICES • Focus on one thing at a time • Shift focus • Goal-setting • Delegate, outsource and/or utilize support • Establish routines and stick to them • Use of time management tools • Get your systems and processes organized • Stop procrastinating • Take at least 24 - 36 hours off each weekend
  39. 39. LEARNING ACTIVITY 5 • Group Discussion: • In your capacity as a supervisor, critically evaluate the utility value and functionality of the various time management tools and techniques. Indicate which have the most value in the NWU work environment.
  40. 40. PERSONAL EFFECTIVENESS AND PRODUCTIVITY
  41. 41. CORRELATION BETWEEN TIME MANAGEMENT AND PRODUCTIVITY • It is apparent that time (as an input production factor) is an important determinant of productivity levels i.e. outputs and results achieved. • It can be logically deduced that time and productivity are inversely/negatively proportional i.e. less time = higher productivity and vice versa. • It is therefore, important for supervisors to closely monitor and observe time and manage this resource effectively, as lost time cannot be regained and the impact on productively can be adversely affected. • Refer to the tabulation of the time management performance indicators.
  42. 42. PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT STRATEGIES • Job design • Intra-preneurial incentives • Training and education • Incentives • Empowerment and participation • Devising reward systems
  43. 43. PRODUCTIVITY IMPROVEMENT FOCAL POINTS • Processes • Structures • Behaviour • Systems • Work environment • Resources
  44. 44. 3 E’s OF RESOURCE MANAGEMENT
  45. 45. WORK ENVIRONMENT AND WORKFLOW MANAGEMENT
  46. 46. MEANING OF FENG SHUI • A Chinese system of laws considered to govern spatial arrangement and orientation in relation to the flow of energy (chi), and whose favourable or unfavourable effects are taken into account when siting and designing buildings. • The art of placement – knowing what to put where and in what colours, shapes and materials, to create an environment that facilitates happiness, serenity, tranquility and harmony.
  47. 47. FENG SHUI OFFICE RE-DESIGN
  48. 48. LEARNING ACTIVITY 6 • Group discussion: • In your capacity as a supervisor, develop productivity improvement and workspace and workflow improvement strategies for your team at NWU, by referring to team structures, processes, behaviour, resources, systems and work environment.
  49. 49. DEFINING ASSERTIVENESS • Assertiveness is the ability to express one’s feelings and assert one’s rights while respecting the feelings and rights of others. • Assertive communication is appropriately direct, open and honest, and clarifies one’s needs to the other person. People who have mastered the skill of assertiveness are able to greatly reduce the level of interpersonal conflict in their lives, thereby reducing a major source of stress. • The Assertiveness Continuum
  50. 50. THE ASSERTIVENESS CONTINUUM
  51. 51. MEASURING YOUR ASSERTIVENESS • Do you have difficulty accepting constructive criticism? • Do you have trouble voicing a difference of opinion with others? • Do people tend to feel alienated by your communication style when you do disagree with them? • Do you feel attacked when someone has an opinion different from your own? • Do you find yourself saying ‘yes’ to requests that you should really say ‘no’ to, just to avoid disappointing people?
  52. 52. ASSERTIVENESS STRATEGIES • Be Firm and Decisive - Say No if You Have To • Ask for What You Want - Matter of Factly • Achieve Your Goals • Constructively Resolve Conflict • Be Interested In the People Around You • Believe in Yourself
  53. 53. LEARNING ACTIVITY 7 • Group discussion: • Describe how you can apply Covey’s habits #1, 2 and 3 as a means of improving your personal effectiveness, time management and workplace productivity. • As a supervisor, describe how you can improve your assertiveness skills in the NWU working environment. • How balanced is your Wheel of Life?
  54. 54. CASE STUDY – “WHO’S GOT THE MONKEY?”
  55. 55. “WHO’S GOT THE MONKEY?” – 3 KINDS OF MANAGEMENT TIME • Why is it that managers are typically running out of time while their subordinates are typically running out of work? ❑Boss-imposed time ❑System-imposed time ❑Self-imposed time
  56. 56. 5 RULES GOVERNING THE "CARE AND FEEDING OF MONKEYS." • Rule 1. Monkeys should be fed or shot. • Rule 2. The monkey population should be kept below the maximum number the manager has time to feed. • Rule 3. Monkeys should be fed by appointment only. • Rule 4. Monkeys should be fed face-to-face or by telephone, but never by mail. • Rule 5. Every monkey should have an assigned next feeding time and degree of initiative.
  57. 57. LEARNING ACTIVITY 8 • Group discussion: • Read through the case study carefully. Identify and discuss the top ten (10) time management lessons, principles and practice.
  58. 58. CONCLUSION • Key points • Summary • Questions • Training Administration
  59. 59. CONTACT DETAILS • Dr. Charles Cotter • (+27) 84 562 9446 • charlescot@polka.co.za • LinkedIn • Twitter: @Charles_Cotter • https://www.facebook.com/CharlesACotter/ • http://www.slideshare.net/CharlesCotter

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