Measuring and Communicating               Your Impact Conference                                          29 June 2011Char...
Measuring the Impact of Your Campaigns      Jo White
Introductions•    World Horse Welfare Campaigns Advisor•    Worked for the charity for 10 years•    Managing Director of P...
The presentation 4
Impact 5
Impact?•       Influence, effect…•       …forcible contact, collide forcefully!•       For the charity…campaigning impact ...
The value of measuring campaign impact •   Are you succeeding? Is your strategy     working? •   Are you achieving your go...
Evaluating the campaign“Evaluation is about accessingthe benefits of hindsight at theearliest possible opportunity.Through...
However…Campaigns can be particularly difficult toevaluate for two main reasons:    – Reliable indicators of progress are ...
Mapping a route to successIn order to effectively measure a campaign’s impact and map a route to successthe following must...
Tools - framework for measuring impact11
B                   a                   s                             Evidence &                   e                      ...
Campaign 13
A successful campaign•   What matters to your organisation -    motivations and goals?•   Establish the need – what proble...
Case example15
What matters to the charity as a whole?• Dedicated to giving abused and  neglected horses a second chance in life• Making ...
Greater impact upon a     greater number of horses17
Campaign goal…•    Long-term: An end to the long-distance transportation of horses for     slaughter in Europe; replacing ...
Why?19
Why does the campaign exist?•        Around 80,000 horses are transported         thousands of miles, each year to be     ...
SMART objectives•        Achieve an end to the long-distance         transport of horses for slaughter in         Europe b...
Our approach            Gather Evidence                    +Raise Awareness, engage support, educate                    + ...
Our approach to planning                          Idea                          Plan                         Research     ...
Measuring impact 24
Measuring the impact of a campaign?•        There are some obvious answers:          – Has the overall campaign goal/targe...
Baseline data?•   A measure of what is happening at a point    in time before the campaign starts.•   Forms part of the pr...
Case example27
Baseline and on-going measurementChallenge – the campaign started in 1927•Desk research – establishing the number of horse...
Has the overall campaign goal been    achieved?•        Long-term: An end to the long-distance transportation of horses fo...
SMART objectives•        An end to live trade by 2020 – not yet•        Achieve 50% reduction in live trade by         201...
Outputs, outcomes and impact 31
Outputs, outcomes and impact•    Measuring impact will tell you     whether you are successfully     moving towards achiev...
Campaign outputs•Evidence – research, reports etc•Political – PQs, consultations,meetings etc•Profile – media, promotional...
Case example34
Campaign activities outputs and outcomes35
Evidence and research – field, desk and scientific:•Dossier of Evidence 2008 –presented to European Commission•Scientific ...
Political – PQs, consultations, meetings… •Written Declaration – 54/2009 over 50% MEP’s signed, one of only five animal we...
Profile and supporters•        Growing base of campaign         supporter, undertaking a variety of         actions: holdi...
Tools and tips 39
Tools - framework for measuring impact40
B                   a                   s                             Evidence &                   e                      ...
Tips… •   Undertake measurements and establish baseline data before you start     your campaign – essential to develop the...
Thank you - any questions?Contact:•jowhite@worldhorsewelfare.org•jo.white@progressiveideas.co.uk•07584 411980 43
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Measuring the impact of your campaigns

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Jo White, World Horse Welfare
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Measuring the impact of your campaigns

  1. 1. Measuring and Communicating Your Impact Conference 29 June 2011CharityComms is the professional membership body for charity communicators. We believe charity communicationsare integral to each charity’s work for a better world.W: www.charitycomms.org.uk T: 020 7426 8877
  2. 2. Measuring the Impact of Your Campaigns Jo White
  3. 3. Introductions• World Horse Welfare Campaigns Advisor• Worked for the charity for 10 years• Managing Director of Progressive Ideas• Managed campaigns in the UK and Europe• Worked in all aspects of campaigning: –Evidence collection and research –Pressing decision makers for policy changes –Educational solutions –Engaging and mobilising support. 3
  4. 4. The presentation 4
  5. 5. Impact 5
  6. 6. Impact?• Influence, effect…• …forcible contact, collide forcefully!• For the charity…campaigning impact is about making a difference and achieving positive change…• …it can also be the performance of a fundraising or marketing campaign. 6
  7. 7. The value of measuring campaign impact • Are you succeeding? Is your strategy working? • Are you achieving your goals and objectives? • Are you making a difference? • Is the campaign offering value to beneficiaries, charity, supporters? • Essential in identifying strengths, weaknesses opportunities and threats. 7
  8. 8. Evaluating the campaign“Evaluation is about accessingthe benefits of hindsight at theearliest possible opportunity.Through carefully monitoringthe implementation of acampaign, and measuring theprogress towards its objectives,unfruitful approaches can berectified early and campaignobjectives revised or the designstrengthened for maximumimpact.”The Campaign Handbookby Mark Lattimer 8
  9. 9. However…Campaigns can be particularly difficult toevaluate for two main reasons: – Reliable indicators of progress are often hard to find – Social change usually occurs by a complex set of interrelated factors, therefore a direct link to campaigning action is not always easy to establish. 9
  10. 10. Mapping a route to successIn order to effectively measure a campaign’s impact and map a route to successthe following must be covered: Strategy + baseline data at start + on-going measurement & evaluation of data 10
  11. 11. Tools - framework for measuring impact11
  12. 12. B a s Evidence & e research – l field, desk, i scientific n e IMPACT Profile – Identify supporter, OIdea impact Strategy Implement Achieve m media… u s measurin / plan positive e t g tools a Education p change, s – courses, u make a u literature… t difference r s e Political m –meetings, e consultatio n n t Ongoing data collection, evaluation, measurement and review of impact 12
  13. 13. Campaign 13
  14. 14. A successful campaign• What matters to your organisation - motivations and goals?• Establish the need – what problem are you trying to resolve?• A clear strategy: – Campaign goal – define what are you trying to achieve / change? – SMART objectives• What is your approach? – Are you trying to change policy, practice, attitude, awareness? – Are you taking an insider or outsider approach? 14
  15. 15. Case example15
  16. 16. What matters to the charity as a whole?• Dedicated to giving abused and neglected horses a second chance in life• Making a long-term difference to horse welfare• …So why do we campaign..? 16
  17. 17. Greater impact upon a greater number of horses17
  18. 18. Campaign goal…• Long-term: An end to the long-distance transportation of horses for slaughter in Europe; replacing it with a carcase only trade.• Short-term: Welfare improvements for horses transported on these journeys, supported by robust enforcement.18
  19. 19. Why?19
  20. 20. Why does the campaign exist?• Around 80,000 horses are transported thousands of miles, each year to be slaughtered for meat• Journeys can last for days on end• Horses suffer - injury, disease, stress, exhaustion, dehydration• These journeys are totally needless – one route passes 180 slaughterhouses registered to take horses. 20
  21. 21. SMART objectives• Achieve an end to the long-distance transport of horses for slaughter in Europe by 2020• Achieve a 50% reduction in the number of horses transported to slaughter by 2016• Achieve amendments within EU policy to improve the conditions under which horses are transported to slaughter in Europe by 2015• Introduce guidance and associated educational initiatives on the issue of water provision for each stage of the journey by 2012. 21
  22. 22. Our approach Gather Evidence +Raise Awareness, engage support, educate + Political Activity = Change Policy, Practice & AttitudesWe take a combined insider and outsiderapproach – we work with people, but are prepared to show our teeth!22
  23. 23. Our approach to planning Idea Plan Research Profile/Education Political Review23
  24. 24. Measuring impact 24
  25. 25. Measuring the impact of a campaign?• There are some obvious answers: – Has the overall campaign goal/target been achieved? – Have the SMART objectives been achieved? – Is there an improvement related to the campaigning activity undertaken by the charity?• But how do you make sure that this is down to the campaign? – Baseline data needs to be collected before the campaign starts – This should be compared to data collected at regular intervals as the campaign progresses. The Campaigning Handbook By Mark Lattimer 25
  26. 26. Baseline data?• A measure of what is happening at a point in time before the campaign starts.• Forms part of the process to establish whether a campaign is actually the best means to achieve positive change in the specific area.• What sort of campaign is needed: change policy, raising awareness, education, changing practice and/or attitudes.• A mix of different approaches to data collection - quantitative and qualitative – stats and the story• Designed so that a consistent approach can be taken to all future data collection. 26
  27. 27. Case example27
  28. 28. Baseline and on-going measurementChallenge – the campaign started in 1927•Desk research – establishing the number of horsesinvolved, economics and infrastructure of the trade•Field research – establishing the key welfare problemsand what drives the trade•Scientific research – peer reviewed and able towithstand scrutiny•Stakeholder research – who it involved, what are theirviews, can we work with them?•Supporter research – who will back the campaign to helpachieve success, and what engages them?Undertaken on an on-going basis…28
  29. 29. Has the overall campaign goal been achieved?• Long-term: An end to the long-distance transportation of horses for slaughter in Europe; replacing it with a carcase only trade – NOT YET• Short-term: Welfare improvements for horses transported on these journeys, supported by robust enforcement – YES, STILL MORE TO DO. 29
  30. 30. SMART objectives• An end to live trade by 2020 – not yet• Achieve 50% reduction in live trade by 2016 – between 2001 – 2011 we recorded a reduction in numbers from around 165,000 to 80,000• Achieve amendments within EU policy to improve the conditions by 2015 – we achieved tangible improvements to legislation agreed in 2004, implemented 2007• Introduce guidance and educational initiatives by 2012 – proposal received backing from eminent scientific experts, now to be implemented. 30
  31. 31. Outputs, outcomes and impact 31
  32. 32. Outputs, outcomes and impact• Measuring impact will tell you whether you are successfully moving towards achieving your campaign goals• Measuring outputs and their related outcomes will tell you whether your campaigning activity is successful• It is important to measure both, and to cross-reference to see if the overall approach is working. 32
  33. 33. Campaign outputs•Evidence – research, reports etc•Political – PQs, consultations,meetings etc•Profile – media, promotional activitiesand literature•Campaign supporter activity: holdingevents, signing postcards, petitionsmeeting politicians etc•Educational – training events,literature 33
  34. 34. Case example34
  35. 35. Campaign activities outputs and outcomes35
  36. 36. Evidence and research – field, desk and scientific:•Dossier of Evidence 2008 –presented to European Commission•Scientific peer reviewed research -published Equine Veterinary journal•Evidence packages submitted tothe European Food StandardsAuthority examining the latestevidence for the EuropeanCommission – included in report. 36
  37. 37. Political – PQs, consultations, meetings… •Written Declaration – 54/2009 over 50% MEP’s signed, one of only five animal welfare Declarations ever tabled, first ever for horse welfare •Consultations – on legislation and enforcement – sit on Defra expert working group •PQ’s on number of horses exported from different Member States to slaughter; pressing the EC for action in relation to the Declaration. 37
  38. 38. Profile and supporters• Growing base of campaign supporter, undertaking a variety of actions: holding events, signing postcards, petitions, meeting politicians etc• Profile – media, promotional activities and literature• Educational – training events, literature. 38
  39. 39. Tools and tips 39
  40. 40. Tools - framework for measuring impact40
  41. 41. B a s Evidence & e research – l field, desk, i scientific n e IMPACT Profile – Identify supporter, OIdea impact Strategy Implement Achieve m media… u s measurin / plan positive e t g tools a Education p change, s – training, u make a u literature… t difference r s e Political m – PQs, e meetings, n consultatio t n Ongoing data collection, evaluation, measurement and review of impact 41
  42. 42. Tips… • Undertake measurements and establish baseline data before you start your campaign – essential to develop the right strategy • Relate your baseline data collection to your ongoing approach to measuring impact – to ensure consistency and value • Keep things simple and relevant – only record data of value, that will be used • If your campaign isn’t working use your data to identify why – Act • Utilise those who are not directly involved to check your approach – a fresh pair of eyes can be the quickest evaluation mechanism if time and resources are limited, as they will identify new things • Make time to evaluate your campaign – there are big benefits!42
  43. 43. Thank you - any questions?Contact:•jowhite@worldhorsewelfare.org•jo.white@progressiveideas.co.uk•07584 411980 43

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