eMend - Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement

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eMend invent dcu innovation team in partnership with channelsight explore one potential method to improve the online grocery shopping experience

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eMend - Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement

  1. 1. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 2Graduate Certificate inInnovation, Entrepreneurship and EnterpriseOnline Supermarket Shopping ExperienceeMEND Project Team:Ronan ODonoghue, Maureen Hennessy, Thomas Pereira,Karen DeMelio, Kevin Carey, Suzanne Moncelet
  2. 2. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 3Content1.   INTRODUCTION  ___________________________________________________________________________________  5  2.   THE CHALLENGE  _________________________________________________________________________________  6  2.1.   The Expected Outcome  __________________________________________________________________________________  6  3.   RESEARCH  _________________________________________________________________________________________  7  3.1.   What is Gamification?  __________________________________________________________________________________  7  3.2.   Crowdsourcing  __________________________________________________________________________________________  10  4.   PROBLEM  _________________________________________________________________________________________  13  4.1.   Use Case  _________________________________________________________________________________________________  13  5.   OPPORTUNITY  __________________________________________________________________________________  15  5.1.   Crowdsourcing  __________________________________________________________________________________________  15  5.2.   Interface  _________________________________________________________________________________________________  15  5.3.   Customer Motivation  ___________________________________________________________________________________  16  6.   SCOPE/SCALE OF PROBLEM  _________________________________________________________________  17  6.1.   Grocery sales are a huge global business  _____________________________________________________________  18  6.2.   Data changes  ____________________________________________________________________________________________  19  6.3.   Survey outcome (see appendix)  ________________________________________________________________________  19  7.   SOLUTION  ________________________________________________________________________________________  20  7.1.   eMEND dictionary  ______________________________________________________________________________________  20  7.2.   Solution Description  ____________________________________________________________________________________  21  7.3.   Advantages for the Retailer  ____________________________________________________________________________  22  7.3.   Advantages to the Customer  ___________________________________________________________________________  25  7.5.   Potential ideas used on the eMEND online shopper area  ___________________________________________  25  7.6.   Potential Implementations  _____________________________________________________________________________  26  8.   Research Process  __________________________________________________________________________________  27  8.1.   Human Computation  ___________________________________________________________________________________  27  8.2.   Representing data using Universal Concepts  _________________________________________________________  28  8.3.   Result  ____________________________________________________________________________________________________  30  8.4.   Examples of how eBay rates sellers  ___________________________________________________________________  30  9.   SUMMARY  _______________________________________________________________________________________  32  10.   APPENDICES  ____________________________________________________________________________________  34  10.1.   Survey Monkey Questions  ____________________________________________________________________________  34  
  3. 3. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 4Table of figuresFigure 1: The three ‘F’s’ of gamificationFigure 2: Gabe Zichermann– Status, Access, Power, StuffFigure 3: Toby Beresford - gamificationFigure 4: The Capthcha ModelFigure 5: The Picatcha ModelFigure 6: Analysis of Customer BehaviourFigure 7: Size of annual grocery marketFigure 8: Breakdown of Grocery Sales by countryFigure 9: Average annual spend per head per countryFigure 10: A retail survey by Datamonior Financial Services Consumer Insight (2011)Figure 11: Overview of ProcessFigure 12: eMEND web presence for the RetailerFigure 13: Customer experience.Figure 14: Customer experience with dropdown menuFigure 15: The customer is brought to a new pageFigure 16: Chinamobile Barcode scannerFigure 17: BrainstormingFigure 18: Poster
  4. 4. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 51. INTRODUCTIONThe eMEND team partnered with ChannelSight, to help create a solution for one of their problematicchallenges. ChannelSight is a young Irish cloud based technology start-up focused on providing a globalsolution of automated insights for brands and their channel partners for a range of business challenges, thendriving the resulting actions where required across their various digital channels. The company is looking for anovel way to determine if two products are identical given two different data sources, and correct it if possibleusing human computation, gamification and crowdsourcing.The eMEND team was unable to address that specific challenge given the time constraints; however thechallenge inspired another viable idea. The team developed a novel solution to poor data integrity for the onlinegrocery industry by using crowd sourcing and gamification concepts, called eMEND.Our solution benefits the retailer by forging a better relationship between customer and brand, as well as havingloyal customers cleanse their data. This is a very narrow application of the concepts. The eMEND team believesthis product can be expanded to include mobile devices, product reviews and marketing feedback for newproducts, among others. This report will give a brief survey of the concepts and a conceptual view of theproposed solution.
  5. 5. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 62. THE CHALLENGEThe initial challenge provided by ChannelSight is as follows:Leverage gaming mechanics to enable non-technical crowd sourced resources to easily and accurately mapproducts between manufacturers and their channel partners.A difficulty has been identified with correct matching of thousands of products between manufacturerscatalogues and retailers catalogues several times per day that were not already mapped by a system and havebeen referred to a human for manual mapping. The cost of fixing these errors either in-house or by the use ofMechanical Turk is expensive and time consuming. Taking a wider view, loss of sales due to incomplete orincorrect online data is significant and contributes poor user experience.2.1. The Expected OutcomeThe stated outcome in the initial document is to develop a system which leverages game mechanics and simplevisual game play to correctly syndicate out via crowd sourcing networks like Amazon Mechanical Turk productmatching tasks which have not already been automatically mapped by a system using manufactures partnumber, bar code (EAN/UPC). However, in our initial meeting with one of the founders, a creative blue-skyapproach in the area of data quality was encouraged.
  6. 6. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 73. RESEARCH3.1. What is Gamification?Gamification is the process of using game mechanics and game thinking in non-gaming businesses to engageusers and to solve problems.According to Gabe Zichermann, a leader in the field, key concepts in gamification are the use of motivatingfactors such as status, access, power and stuff3.1.1. Why GamificationThe Entertainment Software Association (www.theesa.com/facts/gamer_data.php) has reported that more than200 million hours are spent each day playing computer and video games in the U.S. Indeed, by age 21, theaverage American has spent more than 10,000 hours playing such games —equivalent to five years of working afull-time job 40 hours per week.Figure  1:    The  three  ‘F’s’  of    gamification  
  7. 7. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 8StatusAccessPowerStuffFigure  2:  Gabe  Zichermann  –  Status,  Access,  Power,  Stuff  Least expensive Most Meaningful      “By 2014… more than 70% of Global 2000 organizations will have at least one gamified application,driving 50% of all innovation” - GartnerThe use of gamification in the corporate world has grown significantly in recent years. Gamification guru, GabeZichermann has established a billion euro business with Gamification at its core. Ford use it as part of theiremployee motivation program, Deloitte use it as part of their Leadership Academy. It has universal application;such diverse organizations as Wharton University Legal Department and the NFL have used it successfully. It isalso widely used to motivate operatives in call centres, sales people.The use of points, badges and leaderboard schemes is how the user is motivated. Toby Beresford, is a digitaland social architect www.tobyberesford.com He has developed a model to represent the cyclical pattern ofdevelopment:Figure  3:  Toby  Beresford  -­‐  gamification  
  8. 8. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 9Figure  4:  The  Captcha  Model  3.1.2. Games with a Purpose (GWAP)A refinement of gamification theory can be seen in many of today’s online activities. Many tasks are trivial forhumans but continue to challenge even the most sophisticated computer programs. Traditional computationalapproaches to solving such problems focus on improving artificial intelligence algorithms. A different approachis advocated: the constructive channelling of human brainpower through computer games. Toward this goal, wepresent general design principles for the development and evaluation of a class of games we call “games with apurpose,” or GWAPs, in which people, as a side effect of playing, perform tasks computers are unable toperform. A common example of this is CAPTCHA. Users who must enter a distorted phrase or word areunknowingly helping to correct scanned books.Figure  5:  The  Picatcha  Model  
  9. 9. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 103.2. CrowdsourcingWikipedia defines Crowdsourcing as a process that involves outsourcing tasks to a distributed group of people.Jeff Howe first coined it in blog post to his June 2006 Wired magazine article:"Simply defined, crowdsourcing represents the act of a company or institution taking a function once performedby employees and outsourcing it to an undefined (and generally large) network of people in the form of an opencall. This can take the form Crowdsourcing - Wikipedia, the free encyclopaedia of peer-production (when thejob is performed collaboratively), but is also often undertaken by sole individuals. The crucial prerequisite isthe use of the open call format and the large network of potential labourers."3.2.1. Types of CrowdsourcingCrowdsourcing systems are used to accomplish a variety of tasks. For example, the crowd may be invited todevelop a new technology, carry out a design task (also known as community-based design or distributedparticipatory design), refine or carry out the steps of an algorithm (see human-based computation), or helpcapture, systematize, or analyse large amounts of data (see also citizen science). Some of these web-basedcrowdsourcing efforts include crowdvoting, wisdom of the crowd, crowdfunding, microwork, creativecrowdsourcing and inducement prize contests.3.2.2. Advantages• Solutions are owned by the entity that broadcast the problem in the first place - the crowdsourcer.• Crowdsourcing may produce solutions from amateurs or volunteers working in their spare time, or fromexperts or small businesses which were unknown to the initiating organisation.• Those who use crowdsourcing services, also known as crowdsourcer, are motivated by the benefits ofcrowdsourcing, which are that they can gather large numbers of solutions or information and that it isrelatively inexpensive to obtain this work. Users are motivated to contribute to crowdsourcer tasks byboth intrinsic motivations, such as social contact and passing the time, and by extrinsic motivations,such as financial gain.• Anyone possessing basic literacy can find something to do on Amazon’s Mechanical Turk. It iscrowdsourcing for the masses.• The most efficient networks are those that link to the broadest range of information, knowledge andexperience – diversity of intellectual background.
  10. 10. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 113.2.3. Disadvantages• The contributor of the solution is, in some cases, compensated either monetarily, with prizes, or withrecognition. In other cases, the only rewards may be kudos or intellectual satisfaction.• No way of knowing if the ‘crowd’ is qualified/intelligent etc.3.2.4. MotivationMany scholars of crowdsourcing suggest that there are both intrinsic and extrinsic motivations that cause peopleto contribute to crowdsourced tasks, and that these factors influence different types of contributors. Forexample, students and people employed full-time rate Human Capital Advancement as less important than part-time workers do, while women rate Social Contact as more important than men do.Intrinsic motivations are broken down into two categories, enjoyment-based and community-based motivations.Enjoyment-based motivations refer to motivations related to the fun and enjoyment that the contributorexperiences through their participation. These motivations include: skill variety, task identity, task autonomy,direct feedback from the job, and pastime. Community-based motivations refer to motivations related tocommunity participation, and include community identification and social contact.Extrinsic motivations are broken down into three categories, immediate payoffs, delayed payoffs, and socialmotivations. Immediate payoffs, through monetary payment, are the immediately received compensations givento those who complete tasks. Delayed payoffs are benefits that can be used to generate future advantages, suchas training skills and being noticed by potential employers. Social motivations are the rewards of behaving pro-socially, such as altruistic motivations. Chandler and Kapelner found that US users of the Amazon MechanicalTurk were more likely to complete a task when told they were going to “help researchers identify tumour cells,”than when they were not told the purpose of their task. However, of those who completed the task, quality ofoutput did not depend on the framing of the task.Another form of social motivation is prestige or status. The International Childrens Digital Library recruitsvolunteers to translate and review books. Because all translators receive public acknowledgment for theircontribution, Kaufman and Schulz cite this as a reputation-based strategy to motivate individuals who want tobe associated with institutions that have prestige. The Amazon Mechanical Turk uses reputation as a motivatorin a different sense, as a form of quality control. Crowdworkers who frequently complete tasks in ways judgedto be inadequate can be denied access to future tasks, providing motivation to produce high-quality work.It may sound easy to trust people’s desire to help, but it can only work if participants actually think the problembeing solved is interesting and important.
  11. 11. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 123.2.5. ConcernsTargeted, malicious work efforts. Since crowdworkers completing microtasks are paid per task, there is often afinancial incentive to complete tasks quickly rather than well. Verifying responses is time consuming, and sorequesters often depend on having multiple workers complete the same task to correct errors. However, havingeach task completed multiple times increases time and monetary costs.Crowdworkers are a non-random sample of the population. Many researchers use crowdsourcing in order toquickly and cheaply conduct studies with larger sample sizes than would be otherwise achievable. However, dueto low worker pay, participant pools are skewed towards poor users in developing countries.There is an increased likelihood that a crowdsourced project will fail due to lack of monetary motivation or toofew participants. Crowdsourcing markets are not a first-in-first-out queue. Tasks that are not completed quicklymay be forgotten, buried by filters and search procedures so that workers do not see them. This results in a longtail power law distribution of completion times. Additionally, low-paying research studies online have higherrates of attrition, with participants not completing the study once started. Even when tasks are completed,crowdsourcing doesnt always produce quality results. When Facebook began its localization program in 2008,it encountered criticism for the low quality of its crowdsourced translations.One of the problems of crowdsourcing products is the lack of interaction between the crowd and the client.Usually there is little information about the final desired product and there is often very limited interaction withthe final client. This can decrease the quality of product, as client interaction is a vital part of the design process.It is usually expected from a crowdsourced project to be unbiased by incorporating a large population ofparticipants with a diverse background. However, most of the crowdsourcing works are done by people who arepaid or directly benefit from the outcome (e.g. most of open source projects working on Linux).The research phase provided us with an understanding of how the concepts of gamification and crowdsourcinghave been enabled by technology. This helped distil our ideas of potential problems in data quality can betacked using these approaches.
  12. 12. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 134. PROBLEMOur initial challenge was wide to enable us to use our creativity, but too wide to execute in the short projectwindow. We have narrowed it down to an interesting real-world problem that relates to the challenge of datamatching that several of us have experienced first hand. A negative online grocery shopping experience createsfriction which can result in an ‘abandoned cart’ with the impact of lost sales and potential of lost customer.4.1. ScenarioProblem: Online supermarket shopping can be frustrating when products are missing or data isincorrect/incomplete.Sally decided to shop online at her favoured storefor the first time when she received a voucher forfree delivery. She hoped this would save her timeand hassle. After getting through the registrationprocess, she began to shop for her favourite items.She found her favourite cereal, eggs and bread.When she did a search for coarse wheat flour, shefound that only some of the products that areoffered in the store were displayed. Her favouredbrand/type was missing!Sally was annoyed. She had spent valuable timesetting up her account and filling her basket and now she would have to visit the store anyway. “Why have anonline store if it doesnt have the items I know I want? What about products that I dont often buy? How will Iknow if other items such as price are incorrect? I could always send them an email or ring them, but why shouldI do their work for them when they dont seem to care about quality.”When products that the shopper knows are on the shelves dont show up online, the shopper loses trust with theonline shopping experience. She asks, what else am I missing? This experience is replicated with poor productsearch results, incomplete and incorrect product information.The grocery industry is heavily dependent upon customer loyalty. A poor customer experience on line canadversely affect a customers impression of the overall store brand. More importantly, the online sales channel isgrowing and presents an opportunity for the store brand to increase (or at least hold on to) market share.According to the current BoA/Merrill Lynch industry report, online sales are rising and becoming a key driverof customer loyalty.
  13. 13. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 14Executives agree that the online customer base willwiden with the Internet-savvy generation.Younger generations are the first to adopt newtechnologies, but it is the Boomer’s (50+) adoption thatis driving the real growth of technology.Boomer’s have always embraced science andtechnology and are using todays internet-linkedproducts to enrich their lives by staying connected,socialising, shopping and entertaining themselves.While they are slower to adopt the new technologies,once they are mainstream, Boomers buy in. (Nielsenwire, August 2012)Figure  5:    Analysis  of  Customer  Behaviour  Online ShoppersBusy young professionals who value the opportunity to save time and mothers seeking to avoid busysupermarkets are the main target group in online groceries. As one mother puts it, "Online grocery shopping isconvenient and it saves time. I do not need to carry heavy bags, I can avoid long lines and spend more time withthe kids."The elderly, disabled or those who find getting out of the house to be a hardship. One of the most time-consuming tasks associated with caring for elderly parents is doing their shopping. “Some elderly and disabledpeople can fare well by themselves in their homes but dont drive or cant maneuver well enough. Onlineshopping allows them to maintain an independent lifestyle."Many online delivery companies have found that improvements that make it easier for the disabled to use theirsites can also appeal to nondisabled customers, for example, voice recognition software.
  14. 14. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 155. OPPORTUNITYAnd although just 1% of global consumers surveyed already buy their groceries online, 42% said they would doso if they could be assured of a high level of security and a high quality of food.Approach:How are we going to do this? The question we asked ourselves is how can we leverage existing resources withan innovative approach to resolve these issues? With an exiting loyalty scheme most on-line supermarkets havea readily accessible target audience, which could be used with the correct motivators to participate in cleaningthe data.5.1. CrowdsourcingOur audience (crowd) are grocery shoppers, individuals who are likely to experience product category errorswhen engaged with e-commerce. This increases customer friction and abandoned shopping carts. The benefit isthat such users already exist; therefore cutting sourcing costs for the supermarket companies, as they do notneed to go find willing candidates.5.2. InterfaceGamification allows the shoppers to interact with the company’s online grocery ordering system. Interfacesmainly provide two elements:• Input - shoppers can add data to provide more information to the system regarding the productcategorisation.• Output - after the customer has given some input, the system will analyse it and then provide someoutput (updates).Based on this information, it is suggested that a gamification system be hosted on the supermarket’s onlineshopping portal. This will allow shoppers to repair data mismatching by clicking on the “eMEND” button whenthey are searching for products. When ‘eMEND’ is clicked on, it will bring them to a new screen where they caninput suggestions for that particular product category.The categories assigned to each product are treated as ‘tags’ by the sites search engine, therefore the next timethat product is searched, the tag words given by the shoppers will be assigned to that product and facilitatefuture searches for its description/category. Such a product mapping process will ensure online shoppers product
  15. 15. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 16interactions are more accurate and less time consuming, helping to improve the company’s revenue. Essentially,we are improving the relevancy of product search results.Figure  6:  Search  for  porridge5.3. Customer MotivationAn incentive program will be used to encourage shoppers to complete the above process. Every task completedand verified by the system will compensate them by giving them rewards which they value, as mentioned in thegamification chapter this does not always have to be in the form of monetary reward or even rewards which aretangible.This will be dealt with further when we outline the solution in chapter 7.
  16. 16. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 176. SCOPE/SCALE OF PROBLEMGrocery e-commerce is the fastest growing area of the retail industry, averaging annual global growth of 27%per annum for the past ten years, and expected to grow by 17% per annum for the next 5 years, according toMerrill Lynch.However, this strong trend masks the fact that to date online sales remain a small fraction of the overall grocerybusiness. The countries with the highest proportion of Internet sales are UK, Japan, USA, and France. Even inthe highest of these, the UK, the online market accounts for just 4% of the grocery trade. There remains hugepotential for growth in this areas, as well as loyalty switching.General online retail sales have risen to 8% of all sales in the UK, suggesting some particular issues andchallenges for grocery retailers.Retailers believe that online sales can be a driver of loyalty. Sainsbury’s claim that when an existing customershops online as well as in-store, total sales to that customer double on average.Figure  7:  Size  of  annual  grocery  market  
  17. 17. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 186.1. Grocery Sales are a Huge Global BusinessCountry Total Annual Sales Average Annual per Capita(€ Billion) (€ Billion)UK 195 21,000USA 2680 27,900China 1788 1,690Brazil 570 5,070Russia 482 4,990Germany 420 18,740France 397 18,750Italy 376 16,000Spain 205 14,000Poland 126 6,340Netherlands 80 16,800Belgium 60 18,100Figure  8:  Breakdown  of  Grocery  Sales  by  Country  Any development, which increases the proportion of online sales, is likely to be very beneficial for retailers. Inthe UK, Waitrose has seen its online business grow by almost 30% per annum in recent years.Figure  9:  Average  annual  spend  per  head  per  country  
  18. 18. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 19Figure  10:  A  retail  survey  by  Datamonior  Financial  Services  Consumer  Insight  (2011)  listed  the  following  reasons  given  by  customers  for  never  shopping  online:  Prefer to get goods the same day 34%Prefer to browse in-store 31%Concerned about fraud 31%Dont like the idea 18%Not always available for delivery 17%Concerned about security of mail 17%No online payment tools 8%6.2. Data ChangesA typical supermarket will carry between 15,000 and 60,000 items or SKUs (stock keeping units).Bearing in mind price changes, product specification changes, new packaging, special offers etc., the scope fordata errors on the supermarket website is enormous. Data errors and omissions frustrate the customer and arelikely to reduce the level of sales and return business.By enrolling the shopper in the process of fixing incorrect data and missing items, the supermarket gains bothwith increased potential sales and a more empowered and loyal customer base.6.3. Survey Outcome (see appendix)From our small poll of friends and colleagues we discovered the following:• Roughly half of those polled shop online for groceries and 30% do so at least once per month.• The total spent online on groceries is not high. 75% of respondents spend less than 25% of their totalgrocery bill online.• They are generally content about the experience, with over 71% rating it as good or better.• However, 51% have found errors on theses websites, with 64% reporting an error at least once in everythree visits.• An impressive 74% would be willing to participate in cleaning up the data, for some reward. Voucherswould be preferred by 68% of those polled.
  19. 19. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 207. SOLUTIONThe team following exhaustive brainstorming narrowed down the potential options to a workable applicationthat sits in the online grocery store. An overview of the process can be seen below.Figure  11:  Overview  of  Process  7.1. We developed eMEND – (the working title of the solution we have formulated)eMEND means by dictionary definition1. to edit or change (a text). 2. to free from faults or errors; correct.Related forms e·mend·a·ble, adjective non·e·mend·a·ble, adjective un·e·mend·a·ble, adjective un·e·mend·ed,adjective
  20. 20. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 217.2. Solution DescriptionThe online shoppers are the crowd source. They identify problems with the data on the supermarkets website.Ø There may be wrong data, missing data, incorrect categorisation, no photograph, etc.Ø The shopper clicks on a button on the site which offers a drop down menu of error types.Ø Choosing the error type brings her to a separate page, which allows corrections to be suggested.Ø If this error is identified by three or more shoppers, the data is corrected (automatically or manually)and returned to the retailer for correction on their website.The method of encouraging and rewarding the shopper is based on gamification. They will receive bonus pointsfor every correction accepted, and all who propose changes will be recognised. Every correction accepted willaccumulate and after a certain number, the shopper will be upgraded to a higher level of corrector. Increasinglevels of status will reward participants with ever increasing benefits. The highest status can then be achievedcalled Priority Club. Once at this level, the shopper can be asked to take part in product reviews andsuggestions. The participant may be offered express delivery of the shopping basket and to nominate a localclub or charity to be included in a draw for funds or sponsorship. Priority Club members would receive ashopping bag which is available only to this group.A monthly leader board of data correctors could be posted by the supermarket to encourage the participation ofshoppers. Additionally, we would make use of social media tools to encourage community.Example of how Gamefication is applied is as follows:1 Bonus points as an initial hook2 Ranking - badges, shopping cart colours, level up indicator3 Double points on peak changeover times4 Priority club - product reviews, suggestions, express delivery, nominate favourite club/ charity for raffle prize,partner rewards, nice shopping bag only available to Level 1s, trolley coin for all contributors.
  21. 21. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 22Figure  12:  eMEND  web  presence  for  the  Retailer  7.3. Advantages for the Retailer• Crowdsourced Gamification• Security and Data Compilation• Data Cleansing - mistakes kill confidence for the end user, the more accurate the content the moreconfidence end users will have in making a purchase• Tapping into the potential of the Online Market• Improved Customer Loyalty and Confidence• Utilising clubcard and loyal members to maximise• Improving Customer Profiling and Preferences• Increased Sales
  22. 22. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 23Figure  13:  When  the  reward  card  member  searches  for  an  item  within  the  online  shopping  website,  the  option  to  make  eMENDments  is  offered  along  with  the  advantages  to  the  contributor.  Figure  14:  Areas  of  common  product  eMENDments  are  available  in  a  dropdown  menu    
  23. 23. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 24Ø Once an area of eMENDment is selected –Product Unavailable Online – a new page is opened whichallows the customer to input data within the searched category – Sauce – and gives the customer theopportunity to input the name of the product and weight or size of the product.Ø If the customer has bought the product in the bricks and mortar store on a prior occasion it is highlylikely that they will have access to packaging of the product or know the weight/size particularly ifthey buy the product on a regular basis.Ø The screen also shows the Customer’s previous suggestions and awarded points and status.Ø The Opt Out option is for interaction with social media such as Facebook or Twitter updates –however by connecting with these social media they become part of a larger network of recognisedcontributors and added status and benefits and promotions which may be offered by retailers.Ø Potential of shopping though an iPhone/iPad/Android app for added convenience.Ø Option of donating points to a local charity - a small act of altruism, which benefits the localcommunity. The charity can be nominated or suggested by Priority Club members through someof the Social Media sites.Figure  15:  The  customer  is  brought  to  a  new  page  
  24. 24. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 257.4. Advantages to the Online Grocery Customer• Ease of payment• Time saving - contributing products that they would purchase on a regular basis• Social interaction with the supermarket increases trust• Sense of empowerment• Advantages such as free shipping or part of a priority club• Security of being within the supermarket site• Acknowledgement of success and contribution• Option to return to regular online shopping easily – My Trolley or My Account7.5. Potential Ideas for the eMEND Online Shopper Area• Personalised recognition of customer - Hello Alice• Star rating – non-financial reward and indicates status• Sense of empowerment and contribution – ‘which you feel should be featured’• Option of social media feedback and/or interaction• Security of being within the supermarket website• Option to contribute to the local community simply
  25. 25. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 267.6. Potential ImplementationsInitially our solution is focused on across the many categories within the online grocery purchase experience,however in the future it could be applied to many other categories including but not limited to consumerelectronics, domestic appliances, office supplies, power tools, fashion, luxury, travel etc.Once the page hooks have been installed and in place within the online retailers pages opportunities couldinclude aggregating this information, then presenting that back to the suppliers/manufacturers as either achannel management, merchandising or competitive monitoring opportunity.Once this opportunity has achieved scale then there would be the further opportunity to partner with entitiessuch as GFK, Nielsen, Gartner and Forrester Research. Data could be compiled in order to package and reselltailored industry insight reports broken down by retailer, supplier, manufacturer, country, location, item, etc.and demonstrate the consumer interactions with that item which may drive future product insights/changes.Figure  16:  Chinamobile  Barcode  scanner  
  26. 26. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 278. Research ProcessThe team took a blue-sky approach to the challenge of matching data describing two items using humancomputation, given the remit of a creative solution. We split the task into two parts.1) Understanding the concepts around human computation and2) Brainstorming innovative ways of representing data using universal concepts.8.1. Human ComputationVon Ahn, a pioneer in the field, defines human computation as the idea of using human effort to perform tasksthat computers cannot yet perform, usually in an enjoyable manner.An early representation of this concept is the Mechanical Turk: a crowdsourcing Internet marketplace thatenables computer programmers (known as Requesters) to co-ordinate the use of human intelligence to performtasks that computers are currently unable to do.Ø en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amazon_Mechanical_TurkØ https://www.mturk.com/mturk/welcomeCrowd sourcing is a term coined by Jeff Howe in 2006. It differs from human computing in that it utilises thepublic to complete the task, not paid workers. Howe defines crowd-sourcing as the act of taking a jobtraditionally performed by a designated agent (usually an employee) and outsourcing it to an undefined,generally large group of people in the form of an open call. When set up correctly, this can form beneficialrelationships between individuals, groups and beneficiary. The team felt strongly that this was a tool that wedlike to use in in our project.It is important to note that the game FACTory, which uses humans to confirm or correct facts inferred by acomputer by analysing text, may be a model to resolve a part of the challenge faced by ChannelSight.A key related concept is gamification. Using the concepts of gamification to motivate or interest the act ofhuman computing is an emerging trend. Examples of this method are found below:• Foldit• Captcha• Tag a Tune• Squgl• Flip it• Links
  27. 27. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 28Further information can be found in an excellent survey article is available: Human Computation: A Surveyand Taxonomy of a Growing Field, A. Quinn, B. Bederson, 2011.8.2. Representing Data using Universal ConceptsWe started with the assumption that the concepts should be understandable to the widest range of individualsworldwide regardless of education, language, etc. Therefore, we steered away from language and culturalconcepts and focused instead on images, music and other universally understood concepts. Several rounds ofbrainstorming yielded interesting results. We werent able to incorporate the universal concept ideas into oursolution, but we feel that there is some value for those interested in representing data that can be experiencedusing human senses.Visual cues:1. Translate data to well known objects that are immediately recognisable (fruit, animals, sun, moon stars, etc.)2. Use attributes of objects (size, shape, color, location, abilities) to depict a mismatch. (E.g., a picture of ablue banana can be recognised universally as incorrect)3. Compare two photos of a location that are taken from different perspectives. Humans will be able torecognise the Eiffel Tower immediately, whereas a computer cannot.4. Use visual patterns (optical illusions, Escher type prints) to represent differences or incongruities.5. Use of other senses (touch, hearing) to enable those with sight difficulties play (e.g., compare two series ofnotes or two chords to determine if they are the same, differ by an octave, etc.)Methods of Comparison1. Related (key and lock)2. Equal (apple is same as apple)3. Similar groupings (bird and cat are in animal group)4. Sequences (clock progression, horse before cart)5. Environment consistency (pig flying)The output of the matching and identification exercises above are helpful to tag images with key words orvalues, but we couldnt see how this would help data that wasnt already in visual or audio form.
  28. 28. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 29    Figure  17:  Brainstorming  
  29. 29. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 308.3. ResultWhen confronted with the need to narrow our focus to a minimum viable product, we concluded that the resultwould need to manage quality, timeliness and ensure efficient use of workers’ time, and positive workingrelationships. The team brainstormed again to come up with a way to resolve data failures using crowd sourcingin the academic, humanitarian or commercial areas.We chose the online grocery idea because it resonated with members of the team. More important, we allbelieve the idea can successfully be put into practice.8.4. Examples of how EBay Rates Sellers
  30. 30. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 31Figure  18:  Poster
  31. 31. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 329. SUMMARYA young start-up company named ChannelSight asked us to help them with a specific problem. They werelooking for us help them correct or cleanse incorrect data using gamification and crowdsourcing.Our team picked a particular area where incorrect or missing data is a common problem. We decided to focus ononline grocery shopping. Online grocery shopping can be a frustrating experience for a lot of people. Our aimwas to make this process more enjoyable, accurate and allow our crowd-source to correct missing or incorrectdata.We developed eMEND to encourage and empower the customer to improve the data quality of the retailers site.The outcome is positive for both the shopper and the supermarket, as the frustrations are reduced, the data isimproved, and sales are increased. This system has potential for further applications in online retailing andbeyond.
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  33. 33. Online Grocery Shopping Experience Improvement______________________________________________________________________Page: 3410. APPENDICES10.1. Survey Monkey Questions1) Do you shop online?2) How often?3) Average monthly grocery bill? How much of this online?4) How would you rate the experience (0-5)?5) Do you ever find that items are missing / wrong category (online)6) Does this happen one a month/ week etc.7) What is your level of satisfaction /dissatisfaction8) Does this discourage you from online shopping?9) If offered an opportunity to correct data would you partake?10) What reward would you find most valuable?Club points / Status / Priority delivery / Vouchers / User picks product
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