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Comparing Events Coverage in Online News and Social Media: The Case of Climate Change

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Alexandra Olteanu, Carlos Castillo, Nicholas Diakopoulos and Karl Aberer: "Comparing Events Coverage in Online News and Social Media: The Case of Climate Change". Proc. of ICWSM 2015.

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Comparing Events Coverage in Online News and Social Media: The Case of Climate Change

  1. 1. Comparing Events Coverage in Online News and Social Media: The Case of Climate Change Alexandra Olteanu (EPFL), Carlos Castillo (QCRI), Nicholas Diakopoulos (UMD), and Karl Aberer (EPFL)
  2. 2. Climate Change News September 1st -7th , 2014 Comparing Events Coverage in Online News and Social Media: The Case of Climate Change. A. Olteanu, C. Castillo, N. Diakopoulos, K. Aberer. ICWSM 2015.
  3. 3. Climate Change News September 1st -7th , 2014 Prominent in Mainstream Media (MSM) Prominent in Twitter Comparing Events Coverage in Online News and Social Media: The Case of Climate Change. A. Olteanu, C. Castillo, N. Diakopoulos, K. Aberer. ICWSM 2015.
  4. 4. News Reading From mainstream media to social media Are people missing anything by getting more and more of their news through social media? What happens if they switch completely? What happens if they don't switch at all? Comparing Events Coverage in Online News and Social Media: The Case of Climate Change. A. Olteanu, C. Castillo, N. Diakopoulos, K. Aberer. ICWSM 2015.
  5. 5. Our approach ● Focus on one issue: climate change ● Focus on events, e.g. release of a study ○ Drives media coverage of this topic [Schmidt et al. 2013] ● Focus on one social media platform: Twitter ○ Large user base, significant emphasis on news ● Use a large source of online news: GDELT ○ Huge collection of online news articles Comparing Events Coverage in Online News and Social Media: The Case of Climate Change. A. Olteanu, C. Castillo, N. Diakopoulos, K. Aberer. ICWSM 2015.
  6. 6. What are "Climate Change" news? UNFCCC definition «A change of climate which is attributed directly or indirectly to human activity that alters the composition of the global atmosphere and which is in addition to natural climate variability observed over comparable time periods.» News within the climate change frame Defining the problem, diagnosing its causes, making a moral judgment, or suggesting a remedy [Kuypers 2009]
  7. 7. Data 17 months Internet Archive Tweets 480K+ tweets 428 peaks →111 events News from GDELT 560K+ news articles 218 peaks →100 events Comparing Events Coverage in Online News and Social Media: The Case of Climate Change. A. Olteanu, C. Castillo, N. Diakopoulos, K. Aberer. ICWSM 2015.
  8. 8. Event typology Disasters, Natural Hazards Disasters, Human-Induced Legal Actions Publications/Studies/Research Meetings/Conferences Other (Campaigns, Statements) Comparing Events Coverage in Online News and Social Media: The Case of Climate Change. A. Olteanu, C. Castillo, N. Diakopoulos, K. Aberer. ICWSM 2015.
  9. 9. Actor typology Disasters, Natural Hazards Disasters, Human-Induced Legal Actions Publications Meetings Other Comparing Events Coverage in Online News and Social Media: The Case of Climate Change. A. Olteanu, C. Castillo, N. Diakopoulos, K. Aberer. ICWSM 2015. by: Gov. & Intergov. NGOs & Univ. For-profit Individuals
  10. 10. Distribution of events Comparing Events Coverage in Online News and Social Media: The Case of Climate Change. A. Olteanu, C. Castillo, N. Diakopoulos, K. Aberer. ICWSM 2015. Twitter: less interest in meetings, publications, more interest on individuals, orig. journalism News: more interest on disasters, meetings
  11. 11. News values [Galtung and Rouge 1965, Harcup and O’Neill 2001, Stovall 2004, ...] Both media tend to cover events that are: ● extraordinary ● unpredictable ● of moderate and high magnitude ● negative or neutral ● not involving conflict ● not involving elite persons Comparing Events Coverage in Online News and Social Media: The Case of Climate Change. A. Olteanu, C. Castillo, N. Diakopoulos, K. Aberer. ICWSM 2015.
  12. 12. News values differences Comparing Events Coverage in Online News and Social Media: The Case of Climate Change. A. Olteanu, C. Castillo, N. Diakopoulos, K. Aberer. ICWSM 2015. Extraordinary Ordinary Twitter 76% 24% News 84% 16% Both 80% 20% Both tend to focus on extraordinary, high- magnitude news … but Twitter also cover ordinary, low-magnitude news Both differences significant at p<0.05 High Medium Low Twitter 25% 55% 20% News 34% 55% 11% Both 29% 55% 16%
  13. 13. Conclusions Overlap in events around 22% to 25% Don't get your news from only one of them Publications on the effects of climate change covered even if not endorsed by elite persons Methodology in the paper is generic: can be applied to any topic e.g. racism or immigration Comparing Events Coverage in Online News and Social Media: The Case of Climate Change. A. Olteanu, C. Castillo, N. Diakopoulos, K. Aberer. ICWSM 2015.
  14. 14. Dataset on Climate Change in Media (and more) http://crisislex.org/ See Poster & Science Slam Presentation

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