EXCERPT

                                                               Worldw ide Business Anal ytics Softw are 2008-2012...
Business Analytics Market Definition

As shown in Figure 1, the business analytics software market is divided into two
cat...
Performance of Leading Vendors in 2007

Market shares of leading vendors in the overall business analytics software market...
FIGURE 2

Business Analytics Software Competitive Market Map, 2007


                                                     ...
Momentum

Momentum, shown on the vertical axis, represents the growth rate of each vendor
weighted by vendor's size. Momen...
The competitive picture changes when DW platform software vendors are excluded
and only the PM tools and applications vend...
TABLE 2

 Worldwide Performance Management Tools & Applications Revenue by Leading
 Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M)

              ...
Hyperion are not impacted by the removal of DW platform revenue, as both
companies derive all their revenue from PM tools ...
Figure 4 will need to be filled with automation, external services firms,
hosted/software-as-a-service (SaaS) solutions, o...
TABLE 4

 Worldwide Business Analytics Software Revenue by Segment, 2005–2012 ($M)

                                      ...
When dealing with the ad hoc query and analysis needs of analysts, the only viable
method for successful deployment of suc...
analytics, and line-of-business management must clearly identify which of their
     decisions are not being optimized and...
Worldwide Business Intelligence Tools 2007 Vendor Shares: Query, Reporting,
    and Analysis, and Advanced Analytics Marke...
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IDC Worldwide Business Analytics Software 2008 2012 Forecast And 2007 Vendor Shares (Excerpt), November 2008

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IDC Worldwide Business Analytics Software 2008 2012 Forecast And 2007 Vendor Shares (Excerpt), November 2008

  1. 1. EXCERPT Worldw ide Business Anal ytics Softw are 2008-2012 Forecast and 2007 Vendor Shares Dan Vesset Brian McDonough IN THIS EXCERPT The content in this paper is excerpted from the IDC Market Analysis, Worldwide Business Analytics Software 2008 Forecast and 2007 Vendor Shares, by Dan Vesset, www.idc.com Program Vice President, Analytics and Brian McDonough, Research Manager, Analytics and Data Warehousing Software. All or part of the following sections are included: In this Study, Situation Overview, Future Outlook, Essential Guidance, Learn More as well as Figures 1, 2, 3, 4 and Tables 1, 2, 3, 4. F.508.935.4015 IN THIS STUDY This study examines the business analytics software market for the period from 2005 P.508.872.8200 to 2012, with vendor revenue trends and market growth forecasts. Worldwide market sizing is provided for 2007, with trends from 2005. A five-year growth forecast for this market is shown for 2008–2012. Revenue and market share of the leading vendors is provided for 2007. Global Headquarters: 5 Speen Street Framingham, MA 01701 USA This document updates the forecast published in Worldwide Business Analytics Software 2007–2011 Forecast Update and 2006 Vendor Shares: Business Intelligence, Data Warehousing, and Analytics Applications Forecasts Point to Continued Strength (IDC #208699, September 2007). Methodology See the Learn More section for a description of the data collection and analysis methodology employed in this study. In addition, please note the following: The information contained in this study was derived from IDC's Software Market Forecaster database as of September 25, 2008. All numbers in this document may not be exact due to rounding. For more information on IDC's software definitions and methodology, see IDC's Software Taxonomy, 2008 (IDC #210828, February 2008). Filing Information: November 2008, IDC #214904E : Excerpt
  2. 2. Business Analytics Market Definition As shown in Figure 1, the business analytics software market is divided into two categories: PM tools and applications and DW platforms. There are 11 market segments: DW generation, DW management, query/reporting/analysis, advanced analytics, spatial information management analytics, financial performance and strategy management applications, CRM analytics, workforce analytics, supply chain production planning, services operations analytics, and other supply chain analytics. FIGURE 1 IDC's Business Analytics Software Taxonomy, 2008 Business Analytics Software Performance Management Tools and Applications Financial Performance CRM Analytic Business Intelligence tools and Strategy Management Applications Query, Reporting, Sales -, Customer Service -, Applications Analysis Contact Center -, Marketing -, Budgeting, Planning, Web Site Analytics, Price includes dashboards, production Consolidation, Profitability Optimization reporting, OLAP, ad-hoc query Mgmt/ABC, Scorecards Other Supply Chain Services Operations Analytic Applications Analytic Applications Advanced Analytics Related to procurement, logistics, Operational analytics in financial includes data mining & inventory, manufacturing. services, education, government, statistics healthcare, etc. Supply Chain Production Workforce Analytic Analytic Spatial Information Planning Applications Management tools Data Warehouse Platform DW management and DW generation (ETL + portions of Data Quality) Source: IDC, 2008 SITUATION OVERVIEW The Business Analytics Software Market in 2007 In 2007, the worldwide business analytics software market grew at a rate of 12.7% to reach $22.1 billion. This was 1.5% above the forecast growth rate. The PM tools and applications category reached $15.4 billion, and the DW platform category reached $6.7 billion. 2 #214904E ©2008 IDC
  3. 3. Performance of Leading Vendors in 2007 Market shares of leading vendors in the overall business analytics software market are shown in Table 1. This data excludes all mergers and acquisitions (M&A) completed in calendar year 2008, and includes, among others, SAP's acquisition of Business Objects, IBM's acquisition of Cognos, and TIBCO's acquisition of Insightful. TABLE 1 Worldwide Business Analytics Software Revenue by Leading Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M) Revenue ($M) Share (%) Growth (%) 2005 - 2006 - Vendor 2005 2006 2007 2005 2006 2007 2006 2007 Oracle 3025 3429 3894 17.3 17.5 17.6 13.3 13.6 SAS 1400 1594 1815 8.0 8.1 8.2 13.9 13.9 SAP 1256 1438 1715 7.2 7.3 7.8 14.5 19.3 Microsoft 1042 1299 1508 5.9 6.6 6.8 24.6 16.1 IBM 1167 1301 1470 6.7 6.6 6.7 11.5 13.0 Business Objects 1032 1124 1233 5.9 5.7 5.6 8.9 9.8 Cognos 739 817 919 4.2 4.2 4.2 10.6 12.4 Teradata 567 586 662 3.2 3.0 3.0 3.3 12.9 Fair Isaac 397 416 405 2.3 2.1 1.8 4.7 -2.6 Infor 247 266 290 1.4 1.4 1.3 7.5 9.1 Subtotal 10872 12269 13911 62.0 62.6 62.9 12.9 13.4 Other 6656 7334 8190 38.0 37.4 37.1 10.2 11.7 Total 17528 19603 22101 100.0 100.0 100.0 11.8 12.7 Notes: This table does not take into account any mergers and acquisitions that closed after December 31, 2007. This table shows the top 10 vendors based on 2007 business analytics software revenue. Source: IDC, October 2008 Business Analytics Competitive Market Map To evaluate the competitive market dynamics among the leading vendors in an increasingly complex market, IDC presents the 2007 business analytics Competitive Market Map (CMM) in Figure 2. ©2008 IDC #214904E 3
  4. 4. FIGURE 2 Business Analytics Software Competitive Market Map, 2007 <25% <50% <75% <100% Reliance 700 650 600 550 Oracle 500 450 400 Momentum 350 SAP 300 SAS 250 Microsoft 200 IBM Business Objects 150 Cognos 100 Teradata 50 Infor 0 Fair Isaac 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 -50 -100 Diversity Notes: Size is the measure of a vendor's software revenue in the selected market. Momentum is the size-adjusted annual software growth rate for the selected market. Reliance is a vendor's dependence on selected software revenue. Diversity is the measure of the breadth and depth of product offerings within the selected software market. Source: IDC, 2008 Definition and Methodology of the Competitive Market Map The goal of the CMM is to present a quantitative software vendor comparison tool based on IDC's rigorous software taxonomy and the depth and breadth of software market data collected and analyzed by IDC. The CMM depicts the competitive positioning of the leading software vendors based on the four dimensions discussed in the following sections. Size Company size is shown by the size of the bubble, which is based on current year's software revenue in U.S. dollars. Total software revenue is a combination of license and maintenance revenue and excludes any other company revenue such as services or hardware. 4 #214904E ©2008 IDC
  5. 5. Momentum Momentum, shown on the vertical axis, represents the growth rate of each vendor weighted by vendor's size. Momentum is a function of a vendor's annual software revenue growth rate and the company's size (i.e., revenue) in the software market. It is calculated as a one-year growth rate of software revenue multiplied by the company size. Growth is an important measure of software vendors that is available from the vendor share tables in IDC's competitive analysis studies, Software Market Forecaster databases, and trackers. However, momentum offers an alternative metric that considers both growth and company size in the same context. Reliance Reliance refers to the extent that a vendor's total software revenue is dependent on the selected software market segment's revenue. Shown through color coding, reliance represents each vendor's focus on the selected software segments being evaluated. On the other hand, it indicates dependence on the selected software market segments. Diversity Diversity, shown on the horizontal axis, represents the breadth and depth of product offerings of each vendor across the selected software market segments. Diversity is weighted by the total size of each individual market segment among all segments along the selected dimension. Diversity is calculated as follows: Σ share(k,j) Diversityk = W j * (1 - (1/10 ) ), for all vendors, k market segments j Where: Diversity(k,j) is the share of vendor k in market segment j W j is the share of market segment j among all segments along the selected dimension Comments on Leading Vendors SAS maintains its focus on business analytics software, and through portfolio expansion, has been able to maintain its number 2 position in the market and strong momentum. Performance Management Tools and Applications Competitive Market Map The main categories of the business analytics software market include performance management tools and applications and data warehouse platform software. The latter segment is discussed in greater detail in Worldwide Data Warehouse Platform Software 2007 Vendor Shares (IDC #213671, August 2008). Figure 3 shows the Competitive Market Map for the PM tools and applications market, excluding DW platform software. ©2008 IDC #214904E 5
  6. 6. The competitive picture changes when DW platform software vendors are excluded and only the PM tools and applications vendors are shown. The strong correlation between size and both diversity and momentum is less clear in this view. Within the PM tools and applications market, Oracle is still the largest vendor, followed by SAP, SAS, Business Objects, Cognos, and Microsoft (see Table 2). SAP still has the highest diversity measure but Oracle has expanded its reach with the acquisition of Hyperion. It is well distributed across the 11 segments of the PM tools and applications category. Microsoft's diversity decreases substantially when only PM tools and applications are considered. DW vendor shares are shown in Table 3. FIGURE 3 Performance Management Tools and Applications Competitive Market Map, 2007 <25% <50% <75% <100% Reliance 700 650 600 550 500 450 400 Momentum 350 SAP 300 250 Oracle 200 SAS 150 Business Objects Cognos 100 Microsoft 50 Infor SPSS MicroStrategy 0 Fair Isaac 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 -50 -100 Diversity Notes: Size is the measure of a vendor's software revenue in the selected market. Momentum is the size-adjusted annual software growth rate for the selected market. Reliance is a vendor's dependence on selected software revenue. Diversity is the measure of the breadth and depth of product offerings within the selected software market. Source: IDC, 2008 6 #214904E ©2008 IDC
  7. 7. TABLE 2 Worldwide Performance Management Tools & Applications Revenue by Leading Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M) Revenue ($M) Share (%) Growth (%) Vendor 2005 2006 2007 2005 2006 2007 2005 - 2006 2006 - 2007 Oracle 1372 1544 1757 11.2 11.3 11.4 12.5 13.8 SAP 1256 1438 1715 10.2 10.5 11.2 14.5 19.3 SAS 942 1095 1266 7.7 8.0 8.2 16.2 15.6 Business Objects 981 1066 1162 8.0 7.8 7.6 8.7 9.0 Cognos 739 817 919 6.0 6.0 6.0 10.6 12.4 Microsoft 412 523 603 3.3 3.8 3.9 27.0 15.3 Fair Isaac 397 416 405 3.2 3.0 2.6 4.7 -2.6 Infor 247 266 290 2.0 1.9 1.9 7.5 9.1 MicroStrategy 216 250 266 1.8 1.8 1.7 15.6 6.6 SPSS 210 234 262 1.7 1.7 1.7 11.6 12.0 Subtotal 6772 7648 8645 55.0 55.8 56.3 12.9 13.0 Other 5531 6068 6711 45.0 44.2 43.7 9.7 10.6 Total 12303 13716 15357 100.0 100.0 100.0 11.5 12.0 This table does not take into account any mergers and acquisitions that closed after December 31, 2007. This table shows the top 10 vendors based on 2007 business analytics software revenue. Source: IDC, October 2008 TABLE 3 Worldwide Data Warehouse Platform Software Revenue by Leading Vendor, 2005–2007 ($M) Revenue ($M) Share (%) Growth (%) Vendor 2005 2006 2007 2005 2006 2007 2005 - 2006 2006 - 2007 Oracle 1653 1885 2137 31.6 32.0 31.7 14.0 13.3 IBM 1121 1254 1424 21.4 21.3 21.1 11.9 13.5 Microsoft 630 776 905 12.1 13.2 13.4 23.1 16.6 Teradata 524 538 610 10.0 9.1 9.0 2.8 13.3 SAS 457 499 549 8.8 8.5 8.1 9.0 10.1 Informatica 223 248 283 4.3 4.2 4.2 11.3 14.1 Sybase 88 94 138 1.7 1.6 2.0 7.2 45.9 Business Objects 51 58 71 1.0 1.0 1.1 13.2 23.5 Netezza Corporation 22 31 49 0.4 0.5 0.7 41.9 58.3 Pitney Bowes 28 31 34 0.5 0.5 0.5 9.1 9.9 Distribution Solutions Subtotal 4797 5414 6199 91.8 92.0 91.9 12.9 14.5 Other 428 473 546 8.2 8.0 8.1 10.5 15.4 Total 5225 5887 6744 100.0 100.0 100.0 12.7 14.6 This table does not take into account any mergers and acquisitions that closed after December 31, 2007. This table shows the top 10 vendors based on 2007 business analytics software revenue. Source: IDC, October 2008 Business Objects' diversity is somewhat impacted by removing DW generation revenue — a segment in which the company has made key investments. Cognos and ©2008 IDC #214904E 7
  8. 8. Hyperion are not impacted by the removal of DW platform revenue, as both companies derive all their revenue from PM tools and applications. For this analysis, IDC evaluated 150 other business analytics vendors that are not shown in Figures 2 and 3. FUTURE OUTLOOK Forecast and Assumptions The business analytics market continues to be driven by the need for improved performance management and compliance. The fundamental goal of the technology is to empower all stakeholders with the right information, at the right time, using the right technology to enable better decision making across all business functions, including revenue or profit improvement, cost containment, innovation, and risk mitigation. In this context, organizations deploy business analytics technology to find or discover information, describe historical or predict future trends, conduct scenario planning, and disseminate information to relevant stakeholders. IDC continues to evaluate the market in 15-year market cycles, as shown in Figure 4, with the first cycle occurring from 1975 to 1989, and the second occurring from 1990 to 2004. Most markets experience a typical S-curve pattern, with different levels of growth along the S-curve. We expect such a pattern to continue in the current (or third) 15-year market cycle. This analysis suggests that we are at the beginning of a new wave of business analytics deployments that will materialize over the next decade and will be focused on addressing two primary demands: More data. The black arrow in Figure 4 represents the rapid growth of information available for decision support projects. As the awareness of the potential of business analytics solutions to influence performance increases, the need to combine structured transactional data with various other forms of unstructured, semistructured, and rich media content becomes more acute. More users. The blue arrow in Figure 4 represents the continued growth in the number of decision makers with access to some type of decision support technology. Traditionally, the business intelligence tools market has addressed the needs of business and quantitative analysts, with less attention paid to managers and supervisors, line-of-business (LOB) staff, and stakeholders external to an organization. To achieve pervasive business intelligence, end-user organizations and technology vendors will have to rethink their approaches to technology deployment by taking into account expectations that users have for information access and interactivity on the Web and by embedding business analytics functionality into operational applications. At the same time, the number of internal IT developers and analytics experts (represented by the red arrow) doesn't seem to be keeping pace with the increased demand from end users. The widening gap between supply and demand shown in 8 #214904E ©2008 IDC
  9. 9. Figure 4 will need to be filled with automation, external services firms, hosted/software-as-a-service (SaaS) solutions, or outsourced business analytics solutions. FIGURE 4 Business Analytics Market Trends Data/Content Users Alerting Alerting High Collaboration Collaboration Predictive Predictive and and Analysis Analysis Workflow Workflow Dashboards Dashboards Process Process Internal Templates and Templates and Awareness Awareness Developers Visualization Visualization Ad-hoc Ad-hoc Data Content Data Content Query and Scorecards Query and Scorecards Models Analysis Models Analysis OLAP OLAP Static, ETL and Static, ETL and Data DW Lifecycle Event Data DW Lifecycle Event Batch Data Batch Data Warehousing Management Monitoring Warehousing Management Monitoring Reporting Quality Reporting Quality Low Production Production OLAP, BI Suites Decision Intelligent OLAP, BI Suites Decision Intelligent Reporting Reporting Query, and and Analytic Query, and and Analytic Process Process Process Process and and Data Mining Applications Automation Automation Data Mining Applications Automation Automation Statistics Statistics 1975–1989 1990–2004 2005–2020 Source: IDC, 2008 TABLE 4 Worldwide Business Analytics Software Revenue by Segment, 2005–2012 ($M) 2007– Market 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2012 CAGR (%) Performance Management Tools & Applications Advanced Analytics Software 1,093 1,218 1,378 1,515 1,632 1,793 1,982 2,196 9.8% End-User 4,539 5,072 5,675 6,206 6,678 7,364 8,151 9,025 9.7% Query/Reporting/Anal. Spatial Info Mgmt Analytics 549 617 705 787 854 946 1,050 1,167 10.6% CRM Analytics 1,206 1,391 1,617 1,813 1,990 2,234 2,507 2,815 11.7% Financial Performance and 1,580 1,775 1,969 2,166 2,344 2,617 2,902 3,215 10.3% Strategy Management Applications Other Supply Chain Analytics 1,244 1,351 1,497 1,598 1,692 1,815 1,947 2,090 6.9% ©2008 IDC #214904E 9
  10. 10. TABLE 4 Worldwide Business Analytics Software Revenue by Segment, 2005–2012 ($M) 2007– Market 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2012 CAGR (%) Supply Chain Production 890 967 1,099 1,161 1,223 1,297 1,380 1,467 6.0% Planning Services Operation Analytics 1,109 1,218 1,285 1,386 1,475 1,594 1,724 1,865 7.7% Workforce Analytics 94 108 130 141 150 163 177 192 8.1% Subtotal 12,303 13,716 15,357 16,774 18,038 19,825 21,822 24,033 9.4% Data Warehouse Platform Data Warehouse Generation 1,197 1,358 1,548 1,721 1,868 2,084 2,315 2,581 10.8% Data Warehouse 4,028 4,529 5,196 5,757 6,227 6,885 7,643 8,506 10.4% Management Subtotal 5,225 5,887 6,744 7,478 8,095 8,970 9,958 11,088 10.5% Total Business Analytics 17,528 19,603 22,101 24,253 26,133 28,794 31,780 35,121 9.7% Software Growth (%) Notes The other supply chain analytics market includes inventory, logistics, procurement, and manufacturing analytics. The difference in market size and forecast figures is due to recent news signaling an economic downturn, Source: IDC, October 2008 ESSENTIAL GUIDANCE Advice for Technology Buyers and End-User Decision Makers There is increasing evidence that the use of business analytics solutions can improve competitiveness. IDC has been conducting research to this effect for several years, including a 2003 study titled Financial Impact of Business Analytics that examined the return on investment (ROI) from various business analytics projects from private and public sector organizations in North American and Western Europe. More recently, emphasis on competing on analytics was further highlighted by Thomas Davenport in his Harvard Business Review article, Competing on Analytics. Of course, the idea of using information to gain competitive advantage is not new to business leaders. Aristotle Onassis said: The secret of business is to know something that nobody else knows. What is new, however, is the focus on automating decision processes. End-user needs can be divided into two broad categories: Ad hoc query/analysis and advanced analytics by those for whom analysis of information is part of their job Prescriptive analytics provided at decision time in operational settings to the rest of the employees, especially those on the front lines 10 #214904E ©2008 IDC
  11. 11. When dealing with the ad hoc query and analysis needs of analysts, the only viable method for successful deployment of such solutions is for IT to create a self-service environment in which end-user access to quality data is controlled centrally, while the analytic techniques, methods, and user interface are controlled by analysts/end users themselves. The same strategy would not work for projects in which the primary goal is to follow the intelligent process automation strategy of embedding business analytics in operational applications for line-of-business employees. In this case, IT needs to take full control of the solution because end users' use-case scenarios will include little if any ad hoc querying. Instead, organizations will be looking to deliver prescriptive decision support to users at operational decision time. In too many cases, wasteful data manipulation is still being done under the auspices of analysis where automated systems can and should be used to optimize decision-making processes. The traditional excuses for not using more of such systems have included both business and technology issues: On the business side, there has been a lack of executive vision and sponsorship for business analytics projects, undefined business processes, a lack of well- defined key performance indicators and other metrics to manage these processes based on analytics, and turf wars by business units unwilling to share information. On the IT side, there has been pushback from IT groups that fear being disintermediated by the technology. IT groups must overcome this perception given their existing and future high and potentially unsustainable workload requirements. The outcome of further intelligent process automation is not that IT staff will be eliminated due to automation. Instead, IT groups will be freed to perform the higher-value-added tasks of developing new applications and enhancing existing applications to support innovation and internal process efficiencies. Greater automation must be viewed by IT as a means to show its true value to the organization. To be fair, some internal IT staff is likely to be adversely affected by further automation. However, it is just as likely that they will find a new role within outsourcing, systems integration, and consulting companies — all of whom continue to search for new business analytics staff. Therefore, organizations should expand their view of business intelligence and analytics beyond traditional query and reporting tools to include advanced analytics, search and discovery, business process automation, collaboration, and workflow management. As the overall solution expands, an iterative development and deployment strategy becomes increasingly important. Key considerations when evaluating, developing, and deploying business analytics technology include: Identifying analytic projects with a clear impact on business goals. Building data warehouses and hundreds of reports for their own sake will assure project failure, a lack of trust in IT's capabilities, and a withholding of funds for future projects. Executive management must set in place a culture that embraces ©2008 IDC #214904E 11
  12. 12. analytics, and line-of-business management must clearly identify which of their decisions are not being optimized and can benefit from business analytics technology. Identifying performance metrics. Not all performance indicators are key. Select only those that are actionable and impact the business. Albert Einstein said it best: Not everything that counts can be counted, and not everything that can be counted counts. Identifying users and their specific analytics needs. Rethink which members of your organization are the decision makers. You will likely find that line-of- business managers, front-line staff, suppliers, and distributors make many more operational decisions on a daily basis than executives or top managers. Each user group will have their own needs and require access to different metrics — at different intervals and using different technology. An organization's business analytics solution must be ready to address all of these issues. Identifying frequencies of data capture and delivery. Very few business processes require true real-time data capture. However, organizations may need to track data in real time but deliver it at different intervals. Identifying data needs. The definition of data should be expanded to include not only structured data but also unstructured, semistructured, and rich media content — all of which can be used to arrive at performance metrics used to optimize business processes. Evaluation of data needs should also include the level of granularity required to support the business analytics solution — a decision that will impact data warehouse scalability requirements. Identifying IT requirements. Finally, all of the variables mentioned previously will dictate what specific software and hardware technology will be required at any given point in time to support the decision-making needs of end users. These IT components will span all of the segments of the business analytics market and those in other related IT markets. LE ARN MORE Related Research Worldwide Spatial Information Management Software 2008–2012 Forecast and 2007 Vendor Shares (IDC #213930, September 2008) Worldwide Data Warehouse Platform Software 2007 Vendor Shares (IDC #213671, August 2008) Business Analytics Appliances: Novelty to Necessity (IDC #212720, July 2008) Overcoming Data Integration and Data Quality Challenges: End-User Survey Results (IDC #212773, July 2008) 12 #214904E ©2008 IDC
  13. 13. Worldwide Business Intelligence Tools 2007 Vendor Shares: Query, Reporting, and Analysis, and Advanced Analytics Markets Stable in the Face of Economic Turmoil (IDC #212921, June 2008) Setting the Stage for More Pervasive Use of Advanced Analytics (IDC #lcUS21277108, June 2008) Business Analytics Survey, 2008: It's Time to Turn Midmarket Challenges into Opportunities (IDC #211641, April 2008) Worldwide Business Analytics Services 2008–2012 Forecast: Slight Reduction in Expected Growth as Economy Falters (IDC #211324, March 2008) Business Intelligence and Analytics Survey, 2008: What Do Buyers Want? (IDC #211323, March 2008) IDC's Software Taxonomy, 2008 (IDC #210828, February 2008) Software Predictions 2008 — Beyond Consolidation: Exploring New Opportunities (IDC #TB20080207, February 2008) Information Access and Analysis Predictions for 2008: Consolidation, Specialization, Eureka 2.0 and the Wisdom of Crowds (IDC #210362, January 2008) Business Analytics Software as a Service (IDC #209815, December 2007) Worldwide Business Analytics Software 2007–2011 Forecast Update and 2006 Vendor Shares: Business Intelligence, Data Warehousing, and Analytics Applications Forecasts Point to Continued Strength (IDC #208699, September 2007) Enhancing Open Source Business Intelligence Is a Two-Way Street (IDC #lcUS20895707, September 2007) Copyright Notice This IDC research document was published as part of an IDC continuous intelligence service, providing written research, analyst interactions, telebriefings, and conferences. Visit www.idc.com to learn more about IDC subscription and consulting services. To view a list of IDC offices worldwide, visit www.idc.com/offices. Please contact the IDC Hotline at 800.343.4952, ext. 7988 (or +1.508.988.7988) or sales@idc.com for information on applying the price of this document toward the purchase of an IDC service or for information on additional copies or Web rights. Copyright 2008 IDC. Reproduction is forbidden unless authorized. All rights reserved. ©2008 IDC #214904E 13

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