Technology Transformations
Online Learning and Social Interaction
Michele Hampton-Pickett, PhD
A lack of social interaction has been noted as a primary barrier to
online learning from the students’ perspective
Online ...
Social Presence Construct
Interaction
Bonds
Social
Presence
The ability of participants in a
community to project
themselv...
Social presence was first introduced by Short, Williams and Christie in 1976
explained the effect telecommunications media...
Research supports the need for social interaction
Social interaction in
the online course
room directly
correlates with
st...
Interaction is the glue that holds the learning stage components
together
Real-time
conversations Student-InstructorOrgani...
Stages of Learning
Introduction
Reinforcement
Mastery
• Expert in a live format without face-to-face interaction
• Interactive discussions
• Group tasks
• Memorization
• Instru...
Introduction Reinforcement
Podcast
Create Podcast
Avatar
Multimedia videosNarrated PowerPoint
Content
Modules
Expert in a ...
Interactive
discussions
Memorization
Group tasks
Instructor oversight
required
Video
conferencing
Electronic
flashcards
Re...
Student presentations and assessment
Electronic
storytelling
Video
conferencing
Multimedia
videos
Online
Posterboard
Concluding Remarks
Reducing the psychological distance felt by online students is rooted in the ability of
those students ...
References
• Argyle, M. and Dean, J. (1965). Eye contact, distance and affiliation. Sociometry, 28, 289-304.
• Cobb, S. (2...
CUYAHOGA COMMUNITY COLLEGE
CLEVELAND, OHIO
Michele Hampton-Pickett, PhD
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Technology Transformations Online Learning and Social Interaction - Course Technology Computing Conference

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Technology Transformations Online Learning and Social Interaction - Course Technology Computing Conference

Presenter: Michele Hampton-Pickett, Cuyahoga Community College

Research has found that social interactions support effective online learning experiences. Rich media tools, thoughtful student-student and student-teacher interactions, and concept scaffolding underpin successful use of technology in the online learning environment. Examples of these tools - avatars, narrated solved problems, digital storytelling, virtual whiteboards, YouTube and other instructional videos, and student work groups - and how to properly incorporate them into an online course will be presented. The discussion will include interactive questions and answers, audience contribution, and demonstration of media tools.

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Technology Transformations Online Learning and Social Interaction - Course Technology Computing Conference

  1. 1. Technology Transformations Online Learning and Social Interaction Michele Hampton-Pickett, PhD
  2. 2. A lack of social interaction has been noted as a primary barrier to online learning from the students’ perspective Online learning can present educational challenges Online learning increases educational access
  3. 3. Social Presence Construct Interaction Bonds Social Presence The ability of participants in a community to project themselves, socially and emotionally, as real people through a medium of communication
  4. 4. Social presence was first introduced by Short, Williams and Christie in 1976 explained the effect telecommunications media can have on communication defined social presence as the degree of salience between two communicators using a communication medium they believed that a medium with a high degree of social presence was perceived as being sociable, warm, and personal
  5. 5. Research supports the need for social interaction Social interaction in the online course room directly correlates with student achievement Positive student interaction builds a sense of community and belonging, which results in a positive attitude regarding the online course room experience A sense of community or belonging to a group leads to student success and learning Social Interaction
  6. 6. Interaction is the glue that holds the learning stage components together Real-time conversations Student-InstructorOrganized instruction Student-Student Student-Content Timely feedback Visual presence of professor Easily communicate Group workVisual presence of classmates Screen sharingVideoAudioPowerPoint
  7. 7. Stages of Learning Introduction Reinforcement Mastery
  8. 8. • Expert in a live format without face-to-face interaction • Interactive discussions • Group tasks • Memorization • Instructor oversight required • Self-assessment • Instructor assessment • Student presentations Introduction Reinforcement Mastery
  9. 9. Introduction Reinforcement Podcast Create Podcast Avatar Multimedia videosNarrated PowerPoint Content Modules Expert in a live format without face-to-face interaction
  10. 10. Interactive discussions Memorization Group tasks Instructor oversight required Video conferencing Electronic flashcards Remote polling Prezi
  11. 11. Student presentations and assessment Electronic storytelling Video conferencing Multimedia videos Online Posterboard
  12. 12. Concluding Remarks Reducing the psychological distance felt by online students is rooted in the ability of those students “getting to know” their online classmates and their instructor Course design should be focused on increasing meaningful and authentic interactions Instructional design should be used to encourage online students to interact socially and academically with each other and their instructor, thereby enriching their learning experiences Instructor intervention is required to encourage students to exhibit intimate and immediate behaviors with each other
  13. 13. References • Argyle, M. and Dean, J. (1965). Eye contact, distance and affiliation. Sociometry, 28, 289-304. • Cobb, S. (2009). Social Presence and Online Learning: A Current View from a Research Perspective. Journal of Interactive Online Learning, 8(3), 241-254. • Conaway, R. N., Easton, S. S., & Schmidt, W. V. (2005, March). Strategies for enhancing student interaction and immediacy in online courses. Business Communication Quarterly, 68, 23-35. • Garrison, D. R., and T. Anderson. 2003. E-learning in the 21st century: A framework for research and practice. New York: Routledge Falmer. • Kim, J., Kwon, Y. & Cho, D. (2011). Investigating factors that influence social presence and learning outcomes in distance higher education. Computers & Education, 57, 1512-1520. • Mehrabian, A. (1971). Silent messages. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth. • Short, J., Williams, E., & Christie, B. (1976). The social psychology of telecommunications. London: John Wiley & Sons. • Sung, E. and Mayer, R. (2012). Five facets of social presence in online distance education. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 1738-1747.
  14. 14. CUYAHOGA COMMUNITY COLLEGE CLEVELAND, OHIO Michele Hampton-Pickett, PhD

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