Cengage Learning Webinar, Psychology, Teaching the Psychology of Adjustment as Psychological Literacy

256 views

Published on

The old adage "Try, try again" suggesting persistence leads to success turns out to be true, according to recent research. In this April 16, 2013 session discussed ideas that will help your students become better learners and more successful in endeavors beyond the classroom.

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
256
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
2
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Cengage Learning Webinar, Psychology, Teaching the Psychology of Adjustment as Psychological Literacy

  1. 1. Laura BrackenLewis-Clark State Collegebracken@lcsc.edu
  2. 2. Four year college with“community collegefunction”Only 5 communitycolleges in Idaho;nearest 200 mi60% of our studentsplace intodevelopmental math
  3. 3. Four Polls (background of participants)Current emphasis on persistence, retention, anddegree completionClassroom level strategies for improving studentpersistenceQuestions
  4. 4. Poll
  5. 5. Funding depended on enrollment, not retentionor degree completionStudents who were not making progresstowards a degree still could receive financial aidLarge pool of first-generation studentsAdministrators focused on recruitment
  6. 6. State funding partially linked to retention anddegree completionTotal state funding support decreasing; percentthat students must pay increasingChanges in federal financial aid rulesAdministrators focused on retention and degreecompletion
  7. 7. What can be done at the classroom level toincrease student persistence?Without new fundingStill teaching students mathematicsManaging work load
  8. 8. Lack of persistence has multiple causesToday: locus of control
  9. 9. Dalloway, M. The Relationship Between Locus of Control and Brain Research-Compatible Instructional Strategies: Helping First-Year Community College StudentsSuccessfully Transition. Unpublished dissertation, 2011.
  10. 10. Often External Locus of ControlResponsibility for learning given to or taken byparents, teachers, coachesAcademic results attributed to external factorsLuckHaving a bad day (mood)Bad teachingDisabilities (adapted curriculum required)Life circumstances (change in expectations required)
  11. 11. Internal Locus of ControlStudent responsible for academic performance,time management, obtaining extra helpStudents expected to adapt to teachingStudents expected to learn curriculum despitedisabilities (access accommodations only)Student expected to manage life circumstances
  12. 12. Research has indicated that an internal locus of control iscorrelated with academic success and retention in highereducation (Bruinsma, 2003; Cassidy & Eachus, 2000;Dollinger, 2000; Gifford et al., 2006; Shell & Husman,2008)Dalloway, M. The Relationship Between Locus of Control and Brain Research-Compatible Instructional Strategies: Helping First-Year Community CollegeStudents Successfully Transition. Unpublished dissertation, 2011.
  13. 13. Shifting Locus of ControlEducation about locus of controlProvide opportunities for success to buildconfidence in shifting to internal locusDetailed information about expectationsInstruction in academic skills required to besuccessful in college level math coursesTeach students how to get help
  14. 14. Education about Locus of ControlHelp students learn about the concept of locusof control: readings, group activities, classdiscussion, homework questions
  15. 15. A student has missed a lot of classes. At midterm, she is failing. Whenher instructor asks her why she has been missing class, she says, “Ican’t help it. My roommate stays up late with her friends. I sleepright through my alarm because I’m so tired.”97. Who does the student believe is responsible for her success orfailure?98. Describe the actions that this student might take to be successful inthis situation.
  16. 16. Shifting Locus of ControlEducation about locus of controlProvide opportunities for success to buildconfidence in shifting to internal locus
  17. 17. Provide Opportunities for SuccessIncorporate in-class active learningOpportunities to practice and feel successfulwithout the pressure of gradingOpportunities for individual positive feedback fromyouPaper/pencil or computer or board work; individualor pairs or small groupBetter to do fewer examples and give students timeto workDo not have students do homework
  18. 18. Education about locus of controlProvide opportunities for successDetailed information about expectations sothat students really understand what theyneed to do to be successful
  19. 19. No syllabusNo work required outside of classShort answer or multiple choice testsAstonishing amounts of extra credit availableStudents can pass even if test scores are below50%; few students fail courseCheating is ignored or minimal consequencesSocial promotion expected by community
  20. 20. Accountable to syllabusWork outside of class is essentialShowing work required on homework and testsTests more than 50% of final grade; manystudents fail courseLimited or no extra creditCheating may have devastating consequencesNo social promotion
  21. 21. …students enter postsecondary education with avague sense that college is different than highschool, but without awareness of the specific waysin which it is different (Collier & Morgan, 2008; Cox,2009).Karp, M. and Bork, R. Community College ResearchCenter, July 2012
  22. 22. ProvideDetailedInformation aboutExpectationsDirect Instruction on Idea/Content of SyllabusShifts locus of control by insisting that students areresponsible for knowing class requirementsE-mail and brief group activityEmphasize most misunderstood expectationsNo late workMake-up testsAttendanceDocument student “acceptance of terms” toemphasize importance
  23. 23. Poll In your developmental classes, do you requirepaper/pencil homework and grade at leastsome of the problems?A. YesB. No
  24. 24. ProvideDetailedInformation aboutExpectationsTeach students about academic dishonestyShifts locus of control by teaching students what isexpectedProvide examples of academic dishonestyDiscuss consequences of academic dishonesty
  25. 25. Problem of the Day Name____________________Math 251. Where is my office? When are my office hours?2. What is the purpose of office hours?3. When is the Math Lab open?4. Identify the percent that each of these is worth in your semester grade.Tests _____ Homework _____ Participation ____ Final ____ SQ ____5. Is copying someone else’s homework cheating?6. Is copying an answer from the back of the book cheating?7. What are the consequences for cheating?8. What should you do if an extraordinary circumstance prevents you from taking atest?
  26. 26. Shifting Locus of ControlEducation about locus of controlProvide opportunities for success to buildconfidence in shifting to internal locusDetailed information about expectationsInstruction in academic skills required to besuccessful in college level math courses
  27. 27. Instruction in Academic SkillsTeach students how to use objectives toorganize contentShifts locus of control by providing way for studentsto feel that content is manageableHelps students prioritize studying for testsCheck list of objectivesComplete or create practice tests based on lists ofobjectives
  28. 28. ClassSnapshot
  29. 29. Instruction in Academic SkillsTeach students how to find their own mistakesShifts locus of control from erasing and startingover (no control) or from asking instructor or tutorto find mistake (external control)Reduces frustration; improves attention to detailHomework or in-class
  30. 30. Poll Do your students bring their textbook to classmost of the time?A. YesB. No
  31. 31. Instruction in Academic SkillsTeach students how to use a textbookShifts locus of control by giving student confidencein self-helpShow organizationAnswersLink objectives, examples, practice problems, exercisesBolding and colorUse book during instructionAdvantage of using textbook examples (smart pens)Color matching
  32. 32. Instruction in Academic SkillsTeach students to learn from graded testsShifts locus of control by insisting that students usetests as formative assessmentsCorrelate errors and objectivesCorrelate errors and prerequisite skillsReflect on test-taking strategiesReflect on math anxiety
  33. 33. Shifting Locus of ControlEducation about locus of controlProvide opportunities for success to buildconfidence in shifting to internal locusDetailed information about expectationsDirect instruction in academic skills required tobe successful in college level math coursesTeach students how to get help
  34. 34. Teach Students How to Get HelpIdentify resources for extra helpIdentify campus resources; student favoritesBookmarksDiscuss issues with help from friends, web sites,and significant othersDiscuss how to learn from tutorsMake appointments to meet students in thetutoring center
  35. 35. Poll Does your tutoring center provide effectivetutoring that is consistent with your teaching? Yes No
  36. 36. Teach Students How to Get HelpHelp from YouOffice hoursBuild supportive relationshipPre-first day e-mailsFirst day activitiesPersona of patience (without forbearance); no scoldingor comments that students perceived as shaming
  37. 37. Problem of the Day Name ____________________Math 25 Wed Jan 231. Tell me one thing about yourself.2. Tell me something that you do well.3. Tell me something that you do not do well.4. Briefly describe your experiences in learning math.
  38. 38. Why not depend on student success courses?Not specific to mathematics and not taught bymathematics instructorsCurriculum is often broad; no opportunity forpractice or feedbackMay not address locus of control
  39. 39. Shifting Locus of ControlEducation about locus of controlProvide opportunities for success to buildconfidence in shifting to internal locusDetailed information about expectationsDirect instruction in academic skills required tobe successful in college level math coursesTeach students how to get help
  40. 40. Questions?

×