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Introduction to Zoology Lecture 1

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Created for the first lecture of Intro to Zoology for non-majors.

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Introduction to Zoology Lecture 1

  1. 1. Flash Card Info 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. Name Age Major Favorite Music Genre What is the best way that you learn Favorite Movie Anyone in class you don’t want to be in your group 1
  2. 2. N190: Animals Among Us Introduction to Zoology for Non-Majors Cecilia Hennessy, PhD
  3. 3. Course Objectives • Discover and explore other animals • Learn to identify adaptations and understand how they enable niche inhabitance • Expand awareness of the natural world • Understand how resources are limited • Hone skills to participate in citizen science and be an ambassador for nature 3
  4. 4. Broad Outline • Zoology – What makes an animal an animal? – List 4
  5. 5. Animals 5
  6. 6. Animal? 6
  7. 7. Broad Outline • Zoology – What makes an animal an animal? – Animal cells – Form and function – Comparative morphology • Major Taxa (singular: taxon) – Invertebrates and Vertebrates 7
  8. 8. Broad Outline • • • • Evolution and adaptation Cognition and Social Behavior Biodiversity and Conservation Artificial Selection – Animals we WANT • Pests and Parasites – Animals we DON’T WANT 8
  9. 9. Assignments • Readings most Thursdays – Answer 2-4 questions before Tuesday Lecture – Discussions of readings in Lab • Media assignments (2) – Two REPUTABLE news sources – Summaries turned in, one presented to class 9
  10. 10. Semester Project • Observe assigned animal at Potawatomi Zoo • Ethology report • 6-8 page report • 10 minute presentation to class with Powerpoint • At least 3 citations from primary literature • Zoo exhibit critique 10
  11. 11. Testing • Exams – Two midterms – One final • 5 independent quizzes • 5 group quizzes 11
  12. 12. Animals of Michiana • Ongoing animal ID – Sight – Sound • ~3 per lecture • Any could be on quiz or exam • Stay on top of these 12
  13. 13. American Goldfinch 13
  14. 14. Expectations • We cannot fulfill our expectations if we do not share them with each other • AKA: I cannot read your mind, and you cannot read mine 14
  15. 15. My Expectations of You • We will communicate during normal human hours – You will not expect me to respond to an email anytime 9 PM to 6 AM. I might, but don’t count on it. • You will depend on online resources and other students for missed notes – I will not provide anything beyond what is online. My handwriting is atrocious. 15
  16. 16. My Expectations of You • Basic Respect – No texting during class – No disruptive behavior – No texting during class – Attending class and paying attention – No texting during class – Zero tolerance for cheating 16
  17. 17. What it takes to be a student • Set aside your ego – Admit ignorance (ask questions) – Drop your cool (ask questions, approach prof) • Set aside your time – 2.5 study hours for every 1 hour in class – This is your job – If getting credentials was easy, they would be worthless. 17
  18. 18. What it takes to be a student • Respect – Your professor – Your fellow students – Yourself • Take breaks, feed yourself, seek help when needed • Non-students will not understand – Do yourself a favor and explain to your family, children, friends, etc. why you need time to study 18
  19. 19. Good Study Habits • Set aside TIME and SPACE – A regular time, during the day • What takes 1 hour during daylight can take 1.5 at night – A regular space • Dedicated to studying • Shut out distractions – Training your mind to process and think 19
  20. 20. Study Breaks Every 15 Minutes 20
  21. 21. Good Study Habits • Schedule space in between classes, if possible – Good time to ask a question of the prof/TA – Great time to study and prepare • “Overprepare” – Be pro-active, not reactive. Bring your tools to class and be ready to learn 21
  22. 22. Good Study Skills • Use campus resources – Writing labs, computer labs, tutoring – 10% of Final Project grade is writing • “Can I understand what you are trying to state?” • “Are you stating this in the best way possible?” • Form a study group – Avoid discussing extraneous topics – this is YOUR TIME and YOUR MONEY • Study the hardest topics first 22
  23. 23. Good Study Skills • TIME + ENERGY = LEARNING 23
  24. 24. Life and Cells
  25. 25. List Properties of Life • Think-Pair-Share 25
  26. 26. Defining Properties of Life 1. Complex molecular organization – Macromolecules: lipids, nucleic acids, proteins, carbohydrates 1. Complex, hierarchical organization – Macromolecules -> Cells -> Tissues -> Organs -> Organ systems -> Organisms -> Populations 1. Reproduction – Heredity and Variation 26
  27. 27. Defining Properties of Life 4. Genetic Code 5. Metabolism – Acquiring nutrients from the environment to obtain energy 4. Development – Characteristic life cycle from gametes to adult 7. Environmental Interaction – Ecology 27
  28. 28. Fundamental Difference Between Animals and Everything Else* • Obtain their nutrition from other organisms – Heterotrophs • Multicellular • Typically motile Autotrophs Heterotrophs 28
  29. 29. Eukaryotic Cells • • • • • Plasma membrane forms cell Filled with cytoplasm Membrane-bound nucleus DNA in nucleus Organelles – Golgi bodies, ribosomes, mitochondria, lysosomes – Specialized function for types of work 29
  30. 30. Tutorvista.com 30
  31. 31. Cellular Differences • Plants – Cell wall – Vacuole – Chloroplasts • Animals – No cell wall – Smaller vacuole – No chloroplasts – More mitochondria 31
  32. 32. Why Is a Sponge an Animal but Fungi Aren’t? 1. Although fungi lack cellulose in their cell walls, they still have cell wall structures. 2. All animals are motile, if only at one life stage. Sponge larvae are motile. 32
  33. 33. Structures of the Animal Cell • Plasma Membrane • Centrioles • Endoplasmic Reticulum – Ribosomes • Lysosomes • Mitochondria • Nucleus 33
  34. 34. Semi-Permeable Plasma Membrane • Keeps some substances out, lets others in • Lipid-protein composition – Lipids maintain flexibility – Proteins allow substances to cross membrane • Lipid bilayer – Hydrophobic heads out – Hydrophilic tails in 34
  35. 35. 35
  36. 36. Centrioles Organize assembly of microtubules during cell division 36
  37. 37. Endoplasmic Reticulum • Synthesizes important macromolecules, such as membranes, proteins, antibodies, carbohydrates, lipids, and hormones. • Rough ER has ribosomes • Ribosomes assemble proteins 37
  38. 38. Lysosome Via hydrolytic processes (adding water molecule to break bonds), lysosomes break down macromolecules into smaller components 38
  39. 39. Mitochondria • “Mighty” power house • Cellular respiration – source of all energy in animal cells • Endosymbiotic theory – mitochondria were bacteria that entered animal cells early in evolutionary history 39
  40. 40. Nucleus • Nuclear envelope – Double membrane • Chromosomes reside inside nucleus 40
  41. 41. Next Lecture • Cellular Reproduction (Mitosis and Meiosis) • Cellular Respiration and Metabolism 41
  42. 42. Microscope • Carry with both hands – One hand on arm and one underneath • Never use the coarse adjustment while looking at an object under high power – Be careful to not crush the lens against the slide 42
  43. 43. 43
  44. 44. Slides • • • • • • Prepared plant cells Prepared animal cells Muscle Tissue Slides Bone Tissue Slides Cheek swabs Answer in-lab assignment 44
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