Ic tto supportteachingandlearning5july2011

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ICT in the Classroom Conference
St John's College

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  • Educators must get over the idea that technology will replace them. Any teacher that can be replaced by a computer absolutely deserves to be because they just do not get it. I love this quote by Ian Jukes. For years, there was a belief going around that teachers would eventually be replaced by computers. The role of the teacher is going to change but they will still remain the most critical part of the education process. The issue is not so much replacing teachers with technology, but encouraging them to embrace it. Jukes says: 1. It is time for education and educators to catch up, to learn the new digital world. 2. In the information age, students need to be both producers and consumers of content. We have to move beyond 20th century literacy to 21st century fluency— being able to use technological tools without thinking about it. 3. Educators need to shift their instructional approach from director to facilitator. 4. If we want understanding and comprehension, we must teach in a new way. He theorizes that rather than experiencing an epidemic of ADD and ADHD, we’re simply not teaching effectively to the way students learn today. 5. We need to let students access information natively. Just as calculators were scoffed in the 1960s, social networking is similarly cast aside in schools today— where it needs to be an integral part of learning. 6. Let kids collaborate. Prepare them for their future , not our past .
  • Educators must get over the idea that technology will replace them. Any teacher that can be replaced by a computer absolutely deserves to be because they just do not get it. I love this quote by Ian Jukes. For years, there was a belief going around that teachers would eventually be replaced by computers. The role of the teacher is going to change but they will still remain the most critical part of the education process. The issue is not so much replacing teachers with technology, but encouraging them to embrace it. Jukes says: 1. It is time for education and educators to catch up, to learn the new digital world. 2. In the information age, students need to be both producers and consumers of content. We have to move beyond 20th century literacy to 21st century fluency— being able to use technological tools without thinking about it. 3. Educators need to shift their instructional approach from director to facilitator. 4. If we want understanding and comprehension, we must teach in a new way. He theorizes that rather than experiencing an epidemic of ADD and ADHD, we’re simply not teaching effectively to the way students learn today. 5. We need to let students access information natively. Just as calculators were scoffed in the 1960s, social networking is similarly cast aside in schools today— where it needs to be an integral part of learning. 6. Let kids collaborate. Prepare them for their future , not our past .
  • Wifi hotspots
  • ICT definition
  • ICT removes problems concerning space and time the students can communicate any where, any time the functions of first class allow them to chat in pairs, in groups and they can arrange chats with or without the participation of the teacher the students can contact the teacher any where, any time the mail system and the chat function makes it easy to contact the teacher and the students can get quick answers to problems that would otherwise slow down the work process. There is also a good side effect in this; the students are trained in formulating their problems which is a central part of the learning process itself. Naturally they can also arrange f2f meetings with the teacher but again it involves an independent planning of the working process. the students can collect and exchange information any where, any time Naturally the students have to be trained how to distinguish the valid and useful information, but this is a skill that becomes increasingly important in a society overflowing with information ICT gives access to knowledge in principle the students can draw on a global pool of knowledge in principle because it requires a number of skills to do so, among them good language skills ICT makes saving – and sharing – knowledge easier the students can, individually and/or together create records of notes and presentations (portfolio) and thus register their progress and use it for exams this way they are also trained for future participation in global research communities with today set the standards for new discoveries
  • Educators must get over the idea that technology will replace them. Any teacher that can be replaced by a computer absolutely deserves to be because they just do not get it. I love this quote by Ian Jukes. For years, there was a belief going around that teachers would eventually be replaced by computers. The role of the teacher is going to change but they will still remain the most critical part of the education process. The issue is not so much replacing teachers with technology, but encouraging them to embrace it. Jukes says: 1. It is time for education and educators to catch up, to learn the new digital world. 2. In the information age, students need to be both producers and consumers of content. We have to move beyond 20th century literacy to 21st century fluency— being able to use technological tools without thinking about it. 3. Educators need to shift their instructional approach from director to facilitator. 4. If we want understanding and comprehension, we must teach in a new way. He theorizes that rather than experiencing an epidemic of ADD and ADHD, we’re simply not teaching effectively to the way students learn today. 5. We need to let students access information natively. Just as calculators were scoffed in the 1960s, social networking is similarly cast aside in schools today— where it needs to be an integral part of learning. 6. Let kids collaborate. Prepare them for their future , not our past .
  • Benefits and shortcomings of ICT
  • Educators must get over the idea that technology will replace them. Any teacher that can be replaced by a computer absolutely deserves to be because they just do not get it. I love this quote by Ian Jukes. For years, there was a belief going around that teachers would eventually be replaced by computers. The role of the teacher is going to change but they will still remain the most critical part of the education process. The issue is not so much replacing teachers with technology, but encouraging them to embrace it. Jukes says: 1. It is time for education and educators to catch up, to learn the new digital world. 2. In the information age, students need to be both producers and consumers of content. We have to move beyond 20th century literacy to 21st century fluency— being able to use technological tools without thinking about it. 3. Educators need to shift their instructional approach from director to facilitator. 4. If we want understanding and comprehension, we must teach in a new way. He theorizes that rather than experiencing an epidemic of ADD and ADHD, we’re simply not teaching effectively to the way students learn today. 5. We need to let students access information natively. Just as calculators were scoffed in the 1960s, social networking is similarly cast aside in schools today— where it needs to be an integral part of learning. 6. Let kids collaborate. Prepare them for their future , not our past .
  • How do you usually teach these different aspects of mathematics? And other subject? E.g. Afrikaans 1 st additional language. Do you use ICT to help you teach any/all of them? If not, why not? Do you have access to suitable resources to help you teach with ICT? Are there other resources you might use? How could using ICT help you teach these aspects of mathematics easier? better? differently?
  • Teachers are often surprised by the range of ICT hardware and software that might be used to support the teaching and learning of mathematics, languages and all other learning areas, even PE - ICT is not just about computers!
  • Ic tto supportteachingandlearning5july2011

    1. 1. Using ICT to support Teaching and Learning Workshop by Ceanlia Vermeulen Northwood High Durban Kwa-Zulu Natal South Africa St John's College, Johannesburg 5-7 July 2011 Intel ICT in the Classroom Conference, Johannesburg, South Africa
    2. 2. Welcome St John's College, Johannesburg 5-7 July 2011 Intel ICT in the Classroom Conference, Johannesburg, South Africa Welcome
    3. 3. I am Ceanlia Vermeulen (Sie-an-lie-a) If I had to summarise myself in one word it would be Bohemian: n. A person with artistic or literary interests who disregards conventional standards of behaviour.
    4. 4. ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL Not all the resources at this Conference will work for you. Not everyone comes to the workshops with the same classroom experiences or expectations. There isn't one perfect tool or one right way to utilize these tools in the classroom.
    5. 5. ONE SIZE DOES NOT FIT ALL I think it it is important to look at the usefulness of all the info for yourself before you can really think about how to bring it to your students.So, my hope is that you learn something new today and want to explore at least one of these resources. If you have any questions or comments, the wifi is on and my email is available to you.
    6. 6. wifi hotspots There are wifi hotspots available in this room, Classroom 1. The wifi network to connect to is called school . To access the Internet on the wifi network the user name is schoolnet & password is intel 123
    7. 7. The Flower Personality Predictor Ice-Breaker
    8. 8. Hardware: CPUs, printers, digital cameras and audio, etc. Software ( I nformation and C ommunications T echnology) ICT ICT (definition) Text editors, databases, e-mails, spreadsheets, Internet, browsers, CALL software, etc. “ They are the computing and communications facilities and features that variously SUPPORT teach ing, learn ing and a range of activities in education .” http:// www.kented.org.uk/NGfL/ict/definition.htm
    9. 9. Spoon feeding in the long run teaches us nothing but the shape of the spoon. ~E. M. Forster
    10. 10. Quiz
    11. 11. But why ICT? <ul><li>ICT removes problems concerning space and time </li></ul><ul><li>the students can communicate any where, any time </li></ul><ul><li>the students can contact the teacher any where, any time </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the students can collect and exchange information any where, any time </li></ul></ul><ul><li>ICT gives access to knowledge </li></ul><ul><ul><li>in principle the students can draw on a global pool of knowledge </li></ul></ul><ul><li>ICT makes saving – and sharing –knowledge easier </li></ul><ul><ul><li>the students can, individually and/or together create </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>records of notes and presentations (portfolio) and thus register their progress and use it for exams </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. Koos van der Merwe
    13. 13. IT skills as prerequisite System failure Software familiarisation Careful lesson planning Computer phobia Integration problems Level quality of language Content Repetition of activities Individual and collaborative work Motivation Interactivity Multimedia Adquisition of IT skills Flexibility Authenticity Fun shortcomings of ICT + - Benefits &
    14. 14. Educators must get over the idea that technology will replace them. Any teacher that can be replaced by a computer absolutely deserves to be, because they just do not get it. Ian Jukes
    15. 15. Six Strategies that Most Excite and Motivate Learners <ul><li>Education that takes place out of the building </li></ul><ul><li>Learners really want to do it and have a choice in what they pursue </li></ul><ul><li>Learners have an opportunity to collaborate with others </li></ul><ul><li>Learners produce something. There is a product and an audience beyond the teacher </li></ul><ul><li>Learners efforts are useful to others </li></ul><ul><li>Learners have an opportunity for reflection and refinement </li></ul><ul><li>(Joe Nathan, Director, Center for School Change, Humphrey Institute at the University of Minnesota) </li></ul>
    16. 16. Social Impact of ICT
    17. 17. ICT is not JUST about computers!
    18. 18. How can web-based resources support mathematics? <ul><li>Access to web-based resources can help teaching and learning of mathematics in several ways, including: </li></ul><ul><li>exploring, describing and explaining number patterns </li></ul><ul><li>practising and consolidating number skills </li></ul><ul><li>exploring patterns in data </li></ul><ul><li>estimating and comparing measures of distance, angle, time and so on </li></ul><ul><li>experimenting with properties of shapes and geometric patterns </li></ul><ul><li>developing mathematical vocabulary, logical thinking and problem-solving skills. </li></ul>
    19. 19. What constitutes ICT? <ul><li>ICT includes calculators as well as computers and extends to the whole range of audio-visual aids. You might use: </li></ul><ul><li>a digital camera to take pictures of shapes found around the school </li></ul><ul><li>a CD-ROM to research data on the heights of mountains </li></ul><ul><li>calculators to convert fractions into decimals </li></ul><ul><li>audio tapes for learning counting and multiplication facts </li></ul><ul><li>numberlines displayed on a large computer screen to look at number patterns </li></ul><ul><li>a television broadcast to focus on an aspect of mathematics </li></ul><ul><li>a video recorder to record data over a period of time </li></ul><ul><li>data-logging equipment to record changes in temperature over time </li></ul><ul><li>the internet to access up-to-date weather data. </li></ul>
    20. 21. SlideShare Klara Majola 1. KlaraMajola INTRODUCTION English 2. Heroes Klara Majola WriteALetter 3. KlaraMajola Gedig
    21. 22. Copies of this document can be obtained from: Ceanlia Vermeulen Northwood High School, Durban, South Africa Tel: 031- 5636501 Email: ceanlia@gmail.com Using ICT to supportTandL5 July2011 Conference documents and community sharing is taking place on the Partners in Learning Network (http://africa.partnersinlearningnetwork.com). See the community called: Intel ICT in the Classroom Conference, South Africa 2011
    22. 23. [email_address] Thank you Thank you

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