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US-China Education Review B 2 (2011), 167-184 
Earlier title: US-China Education Review, ISSN 1548-6613 
Differentiation and Explicit Teaching: Integration of Students 
With Learning Difficulties 
France Dubé, Lyne Bessette, Catherine Dorval 
Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada 
This collaborative research was carried out among 197 elementary school students, in the context of a rural 
Canadian school of the Quebec province. Several students of the school presented learning difficulties, mostly in 
writing. The teachers and the learning specialist decided to differentiate the groups in special subgroups of needs 
that met for a half-day once a week; they also implemented the explicit teaching of writing. The results showed that 
there was an important improvement in all the students’ writing ability, especially of those with learning difficulties. 
Indeed, the subgroups of students with severe learning difficulties showed a significant reduction in the average 
error rate. The dialogue among the teachers, the learning specialist, the director and the researcher was a key 
component for the success of this project, which aims mainly to accompany the teachers and to encourage the 
effective integration of students with learning difficulties. 
Keywords: integration, differentiation, explicit teaching, writing, pedagogical innovation 
Problem 
According to various studies, the integration of students with learning difficulties into regular classes 
contributes to the learning process (Bear & Proctor, 1990; Gross, 2003). However, regular teachers felt this 
integration was a real challenge (Meese, 2001). In Quebec schools, students with learning difficulties are 
removed from their classroom and referred to learning specialists—orthopédagogue in French—for a specific 
number of periods or sessions (generally between 30 and 60 minutes) per week for remedial exercises or 
re-education. They may work individually or in groups of three or four students. This practice poses several 
negative effects—it stigmatizes the student leaving his/her classroom to receive a special education service 
(Affleck, Madge, Adams, & Lowenbraun, 1988); the student misses regular classroom instruction (Bean, 
Cooley, Eichelberger, Lazar, & Zigmond, 1991); the abilities and behaviours learned outside the classroom lack 
generalization (Adamson, Matthews, & Schuller, 1990); and there is a lack of coherence and coordination 
between the classroom teacher and the learning specialist regarding the content, teaching plan, material, 
terminology and strategy used (Slavin, 1987). 
In 2000, Quebec implemented an education reform, which states that the mission of the school is to help 
students succeed in terms of instruction, socialization and qualifications. A restructuring of the curriculum in 
elementary school is also proposed. The elementary level of education is thus divided into three two-year 
cycles so as to take into account the development of competencies implying long-term pedagogical 
France Dubé, Ph. D., professor, Special Education Department, Université du Québec à Montréal. 
Lyne Bessette, Université du Québec à Montréal. 
Catherine Dorval, Université du Québec à Montréal.
168 DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 
interventions. The new competence-based education program respects the students’ learning rhythm and 
enhances pedagogical differentiation (Ministry of Education, 2001). The students now have two years to 
develop the competencies they need to move onto the next cycle. The elementary level hence is divided into 
three two-year cycles: the first cycle of the elementary school (i.e., grades one and two), the second cycle of the 
elementary school (i.e., grades three and four), and the third cycle of the elementary school (i.e., grades five 
and six). At the end of each cycle, the teacher writes a competence report to determine each student’s progress. 
Students are considered to have learning difficulties when the analysis of their situation shows that the remedial 
instruction measures implemented by the teacher or other school stakeholders during a significant period of 
time, have not allowed him/her to achieve the minimal educational requirements for the cycle either in 
mathematics or in the language of instruction (Ministry of Education, Recreation and Sport, 2007). It is 
important to specify that Quebec special education policies favours the integration of disabled students, who are 
with learning difficulties or adjustment difficulties (Ministry of Education, 1999). However, teachers feel that it 
is a really difficult responsibility due to the complexity of the task, as they have to teach a class where there are 
students with a variety of difficulties and they are also responsible for the individual follow-up. In order to 
support the integration of students with difficulties and attain their learning needs while developing the reading, 
writing and mathematics competencies expected at their level, the educational milieu has to innovate. 
The general research question is as follows: What innovating services can favour the mainstreaming and 
the development of the writing competencies of elementary school children with difficulties? 
Framework of Reference 
In a previous study that examined and described various innovative teaching methods contributing to the 
success of students with learning difficulties integrated to elementary school regular classes, differentiation, 
flexible grouping, direct teaching and explicit teaching have proven to be effective (Dubé, 2008). Empirical 
studies have already analysed the flexible grouping, the explicit teaching and their effect on the development of 
competencies in elementary schools and more particularly among students with learning difficulties. 
Flexible Grouping 
Flexible grouping strategies are based on Vygotsky’s socio-constructivist conceptual model, which 
recognizes the contribution of the peers’ influence and the teachers’ intervention in the learning process. Groups 
are organized so as to meet the students’ individual and changing needs. The teachers organize them taking into 
account the students’ strengths and difficulties. In this context, subgroups are formed and dissolved to fit the 
students’ learning needs. The subgroups of needs comprised a variable number of students and they respected 
the specific needs of the students of one or more classes (Reutzel, 2003). Tomlinson (2000) suggested that the 
subgroups of needs helped teachers achieve an overall picture of the students; this overview can evolve and be 
evaluated in different learning contexts. The use of various materials, different levels of difficulties and 
activities based upon the students’ interests are practices that should always be privileged. She suggested that 
differentiated instruction should allow flexible grouping in order to grant different learning contexts. 
In the United States, Castle, Baker, and Tortora (2005) have studied the flexible grouping in an elementary 
school of 435 students in order to evaluate its impact on students’ basic knowledge. The research lasted five 
years, during which the researchers assessed the students’ progress in reading and writing skills by means of
DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 169 
standardized assessment tools. The researchers also studied the way in which flexible grouping was 
implemented, and to do so they studied the classroom practices and interviewed the teachers. Notable progress 
was reported both in the students’ reading and writing competencies, when they profited from flexible grouping 
from first grade onwards, during which the research was implemented. Only 25% of the school teachers put 
into practice the flexible grouping at least once a week during the second year of the study, while there was 
95% that put it into practice on a weekly basis during the fifth year. Seven out of nine interviewed teachers 
have observed positive effects on the students’ learning process. According to them, the positive effects are due 
to the fact that students can work on a specific notion connected to their specific learning needs while their 
attention is focused on a particular and specific objective. They have also reported a better concentration at 
work, when they are in small groups, as well as a higher motivation, more ease and self-confidence. These 
researchers stress that each teaching instance requires a particular consideration, when students having the same 
needs are associated within the framework of flexible grouping. They say flexible grouping contributes to 
individualized instruction, providing superior quality instruction to all students while eliminating the 
stereotypes that arise when students have to follow a particular learning path. The results confirm what other 
studies have shown regarding the positive effects differential instruction used in combination with flexible 
grouping has on reading (Baumgartner, Lipowski, & Rush, 2003; Radencich & McKay, 1995). 
The results show the positive effects of flexible grouping, particularly when groups are implemented for 
more than three years. Castle et al. (2005) précised that groups have to be constantly rearranged so as to always 
respect the specific needs of the students and the progress they made. The flexible groupings previously studied 
help differentiate the learning process, according to the particular needs of the students, whether they have a 
high level of performance or they experience learning difficulties. When the groups of needs are associated to a 
structured teaching practice, they help the acquisition of basic knowledge and school integration. In the next 
section, we have listed the empirical studies that examine the effects of explicit teaching on learning. 
Explicit Teaching 
Explicit teaching has its origins in studies made on effective teaching practices and is based on direct 
teaching. This research trend examines the teaching strategies and techniques used by expert teachers and thus 
empirically proven to be “efficient”. Some of the effects of explicit teaching—approach based on cognitive 
psychology—are the development of the students’ feeling of competence, self-confidence, more engagement 
and a greater feeling of responsibility. Students developed a better comprehension of their difficulties and 
applied appropriate strategies to overcome them (Beckman, 2002). Rosenshine (1986) divided the explicit 
teaching into three distinct and successive phases: 
Modeling, where the teacher makes demonstrations, making explicit the procedures and reasoning that would 
otherwise be implicit. 
Guided practice, where the teacher accompanies the students, organizing team tasks. 
Independent practice, where the teacher provides practice for seatwork exercise and pedagogical activities tied to 
previous learning, while reinvesting what students have understood during the modeling and the guided practice phases. (p. 
305) 
In Quebec, Boyer (1993) developed an explicit teaching method for reading that helped the students
170 DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 
become accountable for their own learning, as well as it made them be aware of the strategies they used and 
those they should have used; it recalls cognitive strategies and learning items trying to make them conscious. Its 
aim is to make visible the cognitive procedures put into practice, while they are reading. These meta-cognitive 
activities allow students to automate the decoding process, so that it becomes fast and accurate. 
We will briefly explain the explicit teaching model we have implemented during our research. It works as 
follows: Firstly, the goals of the activity and the expected level of performance are clearly defined, and the 
necessary previous basic knowledge is recalled; a few examples are presented and a demonstration is done; 
then the teacher asks a few questions and objectifies. Afterwards, students either work alone or in teams so as to 
use the strategies that they have learned. The teacher evaluates their performance and provides them feedback 
on the answers given and the strategies they have used. Finally, they revise and the teacher provides 
independent practice (Swanson & Deshler, 2003). According to several studies, the explicit teaching would be 
effective to favour reading, mathematics, grammar and the first language learning (Rosenshine, 1986). 
Likewise, it would also be effective to contribute to the success of students with learning difficulties (Swanson 
& Hoskyn, 1998; Gauthier, Mellouki, Simard, Bissonnette, & Richard, 2004). 
Our specific research question is: Up to what extent does the flexible grouping associated to the explicit 
teaching contribute to the development of competencies in writing of students with learning difficulties 
integrated to regular classes? 
Method 
Research Objectives 
This research has two main objectives: 
(1) The first objective is to contribute to the development of writing competencies of students with 
learning difficulties integrated to regular classes. This objective targets mainly the competence “write different 
types of texts” of the Quebec Education Program; 
(2) The second objective is to accompany the teachers in the development of a dynamics of pedagogical 
concentration and a reflective practice (Schön, 1994) towards the group differentiation for all cycles, and this, 
associated with an explicit teaching approach in writing. 
Research Development 
We implemented a group and teaching differentiation by establishing flexible groupings on a half-day per 
week basis associated to two hours of explicit teaching strategies in writing. These groups were not fixed, as 
they were constantly reconfigured to accommodate the students’ specific needs and the progress they made 
during the school year. As we have already specified in our framework of reference, empirical results show that 
explicit teaching can be particularly effective for students with learning difficulties (Rosenshine, 1986; 
Beckman, 2002; Swanson & Deshler, 2003; Gauthier et al., 2004); it also shows that the differentiation 
associated to a structured teaching program by means of flexible grouping favours the development of 
competencies of students with learning difficulties. In this project, the students with learning difficulties, as 
well as those with conduct disorders have taken part in all the activities at the same time as their peers. 
Our aim of collaborative research is to accompany the teachers and establish durable teaching practices 
adapted to the school needs, which will allow the development of an expertise in the participating school. By 
means of a reflective practice (Schön, 1994), the different school participants have decided together what the
DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 171 
students’ needs were at the beginning of the school year and they have followed the evolution of the first, 
second or third cycle students, planning differentiated explicit teaching activities every month during all the 
school year. Figure 1 presents a schematization of the teachers’ process of reflexive analysis. 
1. Attention is focused on 
concrete situations that arise in 
our professional practice. 
(Awareness) 
2. Identification of the factors 
that determine a particular 
situation. 
Resonance 
3. Explanation of what happens 
during the development of the 
activity and formulation of 
hypotheses. 
(Explanation) 
4. Development of a personal 
approach and experimentation 
in a new situation. 
Figure 1. Teachers’ reflexive analysis (adapted from Holborn, 1992). 
(Analysis) 
(Planning) 
The reflexive analysis essentially entails a continuous process of four phases: (1) becoming aware of 
pedagogical practices and describes them; (2) analyzing them; (3) explicating the actions and formulating the 
clues or hypothesis to better meet the students’ needs; and (4) guiding the students towards future pedagogical 
practices. These practices are experimented in new situations and subsequently analyzed; immediately 
afterwards, another cycle begins. These concentration and analysis models have empirically proven their 
success (Hunt, Soto, Maier, & Doering, 2003). 
Procedures 
At the beginning of the school year, the learning needs of the students of the three cycles were identified, 
and the subgroups of needs were established, taking into account their level of competence in writing. Then, the 
students named their groups: comets, meteoroids, suns, etc.. Students with severe learning difficulties benefited 
from the explicit teaching in subgroups of needs with a ratio of one teacher for every six students. For the 
students with less severe learning difficulties, and those who had already developed the required competencies 
in writing, the teachers proposed writing situations respecting their learning needs, always favouring explicit 
teaching strategies in writing. The more students the groups had, the better the students’ level of competence 
was. However, subgroups were flexible: Students could change subgroups at any time during the school year. 
Each teacher was responsible for a subgroup of needs. The learning specialist was responsible for the subgroup 
with severe learning difficulties in the first, second and third cycles. 
The monthly guidance meetings guaranteed the students’ follow-up and the researcher accompanied the
172 DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 
school participants both in the organization of the flexible groupings (Tomlinson, 2000) and the planning of the 
explicit teaching approach activities, respecting the students’ learning difficulties which were determined by the 
teachers of each cycle (Beckman, 2002; Swanson & Deshler, 2003; Gauthier et al., 2004). In addition, every 
fortnight, the students and the teachers of the three cycles participated in flexible groupings associated to two 
hours of explicit teaching in writing. 
Data Collection 
A mixed method was used for qualitative and quantitative data collection: 
(1) To achieve the first objective of the research and evaluate the progress of the development of the 
students’ competencies, three writing tasks were designed to evaluate the students’ progress: one at the 
beginning (in October), another in the middle (in January) and the third at the end (in May). We could thus 
compare the results from the beginning to the end of the school year for every student of all subgroups’ needs; 
(2) To achieve the second objective of the research, a concertation and training day on explicit teaching 
was planned at the beginning of the school year with the teachers, the learning specialist, the principal, the 
research assistant and the researcher. 
We will now describe the explicit teaching model applied in our study: 
(1) Clearly define the goals of the activity and the expected level of performance; 
(2) Review of previous, prerequisite learning; 
(3) Present examples and do demonstrations; 
(4) Ask the students a few questions and favour the objectivity; 
(5) Make the students work alone or in teams to apply the strategies explicitly taught—this phase enhances the 
cooperation among the students of the subgroup; 
(6) Evaluate the students’ performances and provide them feedback on the answers given and the strategies they have 
used; 
(7) Do independent practice and revise. (Swanson & Deshler, 2003) 
Monthly meetings assured the follow-up. The teachers and the learning specialist wrote a fortnight journal 
so as to leave traces of the component skill “write different types of texts” done in the subgroups’ needs and 
also to write down the modifications the subgroups experience. The observations were written down in a 
structured way and all the participants used identical notebooks, so as to facilitate the future qualitative data 
collection (Van der Maren, 1996). 
Samples 
The sample was composed of 197 students, of whom 39 were of the first cycle in the second year, 80 were 
of the second cycle in the third and fourth years, 64 were of the third cycle in the fifth and sixth years. 
The school has 250 students in all but those attending kindergarten (five years old) and the first school 
year were not included in the research. 
Data Analysis Plan 
The data obtained in the tasks done in October (task 1), January (task 2) and May (task 3) were analysed, 
so as to determine the progress of students with learning difficulties and the data obtained was compared to that 
of the other subgroups’ needs. The complex writing tasks were corrected with the help of a uniformed and 
standardized assessment grid. The data were compiled and analyzed using Excel.
DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 173 
The teachers and the specialist wrote a weekly journal, which was mechanically analyzed with a word 
processor and the results for each teaching cycle were compared to trace the modifications made to each 
subgroup of needs. The data collected also allowed us to keep traces of the writing strategies employed as well 
as the phases of the explicit teaching planned for each one of the subgroups of needs. 
The results obtained in the competence “write different types of texts” were assessed as follows. One 
corrector, a graduated teacher and candidate to a Master in Education, corrected the three writing tasks with the 
help of an assessment grid based on Ministère de l’Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport (2004). We established five 
error categories: orthography, conjugation, agreement, punctuation and syntax. We counted the total number of 
words written by each student, as well as the number of errors for each category in order to calculate the error 
rate as follows: 
Number of errors (ne) 
Total number of words (nt) 
Error rate (y) 
Results 
y = ne 
nt * 100 
Firstly, we will show the results of the three writing tasks for all the students differentiating their 
elementary level cycle. Secondly, we will present the results for each subgroup’s needs from the first cycle, the 
second cycle and the third cycle, specifying the results of each subgroup of needs, as well as the type of errors 
that they made in each of the three writing tasks. Finally, we will bring before the teachers the results obtained. 
The Students 
Figure 2 shows a reduction in the error rate for the students of the first, second and third cycles between 
the first and the second task. A slight increase can be observed during the third writing task. However, on 
average, there was a 5.45% reduction for the first cycle, an 8.1% for the second cycle and a 7.61% for the third 
cycle from the beginning of the school year to the end, for all types of errors. The vertical line illustrates the 
variances for each one of the activities. 
33.78 
38.22 
26.26 
18.29 
27.65 
18.26 
28.33 
30.12 
18.65 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 
0 
1st cycle 2nd cycle 3rd cycle 
Error rate 
Average error rate by cycle 
Average error rate, activity 1 
Average error rate, activity 2 
Average error rate, activity 3 
Figure 2. Students’ average error rate for the three cycles.
174 DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 
The first cycle students. We will show the results of the three writing tasks of first cycle students. The 
subgroups’ needs were divided as follows: Subgroup 1 gathered the students with severe learning difficulties in 
writing, while subgroup 4 with the highest level of competence in writing. Figure 3 presents the average error 
rate in the students of all subgroups differentiating activities 1, 2 and 3. 
55.55 
35.33 
32.69 
22.42 
14.55 
30.58 
17.46 
16.19 
39.33 38.19 
26.79 
16.58 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 
0 
Subgroup 1 Subgroup 2 Subgroup 3 Subgroup 4 
Error rate 
Average error rate of 1st cycle subgroups 
Average error rate, activity 1 
Average error rate, activity 2 
Average error rate, activity 3 
Figure 3. The first cycle average error rate for all subgroups of needs. 
When we assessed the students’ results, we also compared the subgroups of needs among them. We found 
that those with severe learning difficulties (subgroup 1) had the greatest reduction in error rate, from 55.55% to 
39.33%, a 16.22% reduction, and it is for all types of errors, from the beginning to the end of the school year. 
Figure 4 shows the total number of words written for each of the writing tasks in the subgroups’ needs. We 
observe an increase in the number of words written by all subgroups with a highest increase for the group of 
students with high level of competence. They wrote longer texts reducing a 5.84% their error rate. 
Figure 5 shows the error rate for each one of the three writing tasks, according to the five categories of 
errors. The results allow us to establish that the most important error rate reduction was observed in orthography, 
from 19.88% to 13.88%, an average reduction of 6% from the beginning to the end of the school year. 
When we analyze the results of the subgroups of students with severe learning difficulties, we confirm 
once again that the orthography errors are the ones that decreased the most, from 34.04% to 20.06% between 
October and May, an average reduction of almost 14% (see Figure 6). 
The second cycle students. In this section, we will present the results obtained in the three writing tasks 
of the second cycle students. The subgroups’ needs were organized as follows: Subgroup 1 had the students 
with severe learning difficulties in writing, while subgroup 5 had those with the highest level of competence. 
The Figure 7 shows the students’ average error rate for each of the subgroups differentiating activities 1, 2 and 
3. 
During the school year, there was an important reduction in the average error rate of second cycle students’ 
needs. However, the increase of the error rate reported between the second and the third task for students in the
DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 175 
first cycle is not so noticeable for students in second cycle. If we analyze the results for the first subgroup of 
need—students with severe learning difficulties—they passed from an error rate of 51.14% to 37.75% from 
October to May. All the other subgroups’ needs have improved their competencies in writing. 
150 
125 
100 
75 
50 
25 
Figure 4. Number of words written by the first cycle students while in their subgroups of needs. 
19.88 
9.58 
13.88 
6.90 
3.56 3.93 
2.43 2.44 2.00 2.69 1.87 
6.38 
1.79 0.83 
2.15 
30 
20 
10 
0 
Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 
Orthography Conjugation Agreement Punctuation Syntax 
Error rate 
The first cycle students' average error rate 
All types of errors 
Figure 5. The first cycle average error rate according to the type of error. 
0 
Tâche 1 Tâche 2 Tâche 3 
Mots écrits 
Sous-groupe 1 
Sous-groupe 2 
Sous-groupe 3 
Sous-groupe 4 
Average number of words written by each subgroup 
Subgroup 1 
Subgroup 2 
Subgroup 3 
Subgroup 4 
Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3
176 DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 
34.04 
7.47 
20.06 
9.81 
4.46 4.81 4.52 
0.44 
2.45 
4.27 
1.74 
10.83 
2.91 
0.44 1.18 
30 
20 
10 
0 
Activity 1Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1Activity 2 Activity 3 
Orthography Conjugation Agreement Punctuation Syntax 
Error rate 
The first cycle students' average error rate 
Students with severe learning difficulties 
Figure 6. The first cycle students’ average error rate of students with severe learning difficulties. 
51.14 
46.92 
38.33 
34.30 
32.21 
36.58 
34.07 
26.13 26.74 
21.48 
37.75 
32.56 30.35 
28.01 
25.71 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 
0 
Subgroup 1 Subgroup 2 Subgroup 3 Subgroup 4 Subgroup 5 
Error rate 
Average error rate of 2nd cycle subgroups 
Average error rate, activity 1 
Average error rate, activity 2 
Average error rate, activity 3 
Figure 7. Average error rate of the second cycle subgroups’ needs. 
Figure 8 shows a significant increase in the number of words written for each one of the writing tasks for 
all the subgroups’ needs. However, we observe that students with severe learning difficulties are those who had 
the most drastic increase in the number of words written. It is also important to observe that they are the ones 
who made fewer errors in the third writing task. These results show an important improvement of the level of
DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 177 
writing competencies for the second cycle students with learning difficulties. 
Moyenne de mots écrits par chaque sous-groupe 
250 
225 
200 
175 
150 
125 
100 
75 
50 
25 
0 
Average number of words written by each subgroup 
Tâche 1 Tâche 2 Tâche 3 
Mots écrits 
Subgroup 1 
Subgroup2 
Subgroup 3 
Subgroup 4 
Subgroup 5 
Sous-groupe 1 
Sous-groupe 2 
Sous-groupe 3 
Sous-groupe 4 
Sous-groupe 5 
Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 
Figure 8. Average number of words written by the second cycle students while in their subgroups of needs. 
19.95 
12.21 12.34 
7.00 7.58 
5.70 
4.17 
2.42 2.75 
4.03 
2.78 
6.07 
3.13 2.66 3.26 
Number of words 
30 
20 
10 
0 
Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 
Orthography Conjugation Agreement Punctuation Syntax 
Error rate 
The second cycle students' average error rate 
All types of errors 
Figure 9. Average error rate of the second cycle students, according to the type of errors. 
Figure 9 shows the reduction in the error rate, according to the type of error: orthography, conjugation, 
agreement, punctuation or syntax for all students in the second cycle, and this, for the first, second, and third 
writing tasks. We observe that for this cycle, the orthography errors are also the ones that significantly
178 DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 
decreased the most, from 19.95% in the first task, to 12.34% in the third task, an average reduction of 7.61%. 
28.26 
18.56 
15.04 
9.67 
8.40 
8.72 
3.66 3.32 2.53 
4.74 
3.14 
6.86 
4.80 
3.15 
4.60 
30 
20 
10 
0 
Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 
Orthography Conjugation Agreement Punctuation Syntax 
Error rate 
The second cycle students' average error rate 
Students with severe learning difficulties 
Figure 10. The second cycle average error rate of students with severe learning difficulties. 
Figure 10 shows that students with severe learning difficulties were the ones who saw their orthography 
error rate constantly drop, from 28.26% on the first activity, to 18.56% afterwards. On the whole, the average 
reduction rate was of 15.04%, for the first subgroup, which represents a 13.22% reduction in the error rate of 
orthography. It was also observed that the subgroups that reported most overall positive effects in the first and 
second cycles were those students with severe learning difficulties. 
34.14 34.78 
27.51 
22.57 
19.42 
25.99 
22.79 
18.48 
14.48 
12.85 
26.31 
23.43 
18.58 
13.67 
13.75 
60 
50 
40 
30 
20 
10 
0 
Subgroup 1 Subgroup 2 Subgroup 3 Subgroup 4 Subgroup 5 
Error rate 
Average error rate of 3rd cycle subgroups 
Average error rate, activity 1 
Average error rate, activity 2 
Average error rate, activity 3 
Figure 11. Average error rate of the third cycle subgroups’ needs. 
Error rate 
The third cycle students. As Figure 11 shows, all subgroups achieved, in average, an error rate reduction. 
However, for the third cycle, the students of the second subgroups’ needs—those who presented difficulties but 
not severe ones—presented the most significant drop in the error rate from 34.78% in October, to 23.43% in
DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 179 
May, an 11.35% reduction in the error rate. For the students with severe learning difficulties, we observe that 
the average error rate fell from 34.14% to 26.31%, a 7.83% reduction in the error rate. 
Figure 12 shows an important increase in the number of words written in each one of the writing tasks, and 
that for all the subgroups’ needs, except for the third cycle students with severe learning difficulties. Indeed, the 
learning specialist responsible for this subgroup had asked the students to limit the number of words to 200. 
Unfortunately, we cannot assert if there would have been a rise of the number of words written for this 
subgroup, without the teacher’s specific instruction. 
Moyenne du nombre de mots écrits par chaque sous-groupe 
500 
400 
300 
200 
100 
0 
Average number of words written by each subgroup 
Tâche 1 Tâche 2 Tâche 3 
Sous-groupe 1 
Sous-groupe 2 
Sous-groupe 3 
Sous-groupe 4 
Sous-groupe 5 
Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 
Subgroup 1 
Subgroup2 
Subgrou 
Subgroup 3 
Subgroup 4 
Subgroup 5 
p 1 
Figure 12. Average number of words written by 3rd cycle students while in their subgroups of needs. 
Mots écrits 
Nubmer of words 
The third cycle students, of all subgroups and considering the results of all students, saw their average 
error rate drop from 11.83% to 6.46% between the first and the third task, a 5.37% reduction in the error rate in 
orthography. For the other categories of errors we observe a 1% reduction of the average error rate (see Figure 13). 
According to Figure 14, the analysis of the results obtained by the students of the subgroup with severe 
learning difficulties in writing, once again shows a marked reduction in the error rate in orthography. In fact, 
the error rate drops from 16.96% in September, to 10.57% in May, a 6.39% reduction in the error rate in 
orthography. This reduction is more important than the average for all the third cycle students, but it is less 
marked than for the students of the subgroups’ needs with severe learning difficulties of the first and second 
cycles. For the other types of errors, few effects were observed. We note a minor increase of the punctuation 
error rate, a little more than 1%. Notwithstanding, the reduction in the error rate for the students in the third 
cycle is less important, not only in orthography but also globally. This can be explained by the fact that the third 
cycle students were more experienced writers and thus the effects of this methodology were not as marked as in
180 DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 
the subgroups of the other two cycles. 
11.83 
6.57 6.46 5.75 
4.57 4.39 3.58 
2.35 2.58 
3.85 
3.05 3.45 
2.54 1.63 1.70 
30 
20 
10 
0 
Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 
Orthography Conjugation Agreement Punctuation Syntax 
Error rate 
The third cycle students' average error rate 
All types of errors 
Figure 13. Error rate of the third cycle subgroups of needs according to the types of errors. 
16.96 
10.35 10.57 
8.66 
6.81 6.01 
3.62 2.64 3.47 3.25 
4.58 4.91 
1.65 1.62 1.36 
30 
20 
10 
0 
Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 
Orthography Conjugation Agreement Punctuation Syntax 
Error rate 
The third cycle students' average error rate 
Students with severe learning difficulties 
Figure 14. Average error rate for the third cycle subgroup of students with severe learning difficulties. 
Error rate 
The Teachers 
The teachers, the learning specialist and the school principal wanted to innovate, so as to integrate all 
school students and help them with their difficulties. The researcher accompanied the teachers during the entire 
project so that they could go beyond their apprehensions: They had to delegate their students to another 
colleague of the same cycle, teach students that they may not know and thus had to adapt themselves to the 
students. It is important to point out that one of the guiding principles of this project is that teachers have to 
adapt themselves to the students’ learning needs. The journal recorded the strategies explicitly taught during the 
flexible periods. The teachers chose topics in relation with the simple sentences: types of words, agreement, 
punctuation, spelling, as well as outline writing. Every month, once the theme for the cycle was determined, 
each teacher had to plan a sequence of differentiated explicit teaching recourses for the subgroup’s needs he/she
DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 181 
was responsible for. The teachers noticed that all students, especially the youngest, were more motivated to 
participate in class, when they were in the subgroups. In addition, when they taught their own group of students, 
they could remark the positive effects of the subgroups, as the students used the strategies they had learned 
during the research project in every day writing situations, when they were in their own classes. 
Discussion 
A global reduction in the average error rate for all cycles was reported. The most important reduction is 
shown from the first to the second task, with a minor increase of the average error rate in the third task. This 
increase could be explained by the fact that the third writing task was significantly longer. Unfortunately, for 
the third cycle students with severe difficulties, it is impossible to determine the variation of the number of 
words written, as the experiment conditions were different due to a restriction of the numbers of words they 
could write. 
The first objective of the research was accomplished and the most important effects of our project 
association of the flexible grouping with the explicit teaching in writing were obtained for the first and the 
second cycles, and this is, particularly for the students with severe difficulties. These students did fewer errors, 
despite they wrote longer texts. In the following, we will present a synthesis of some of the most significant 
outcomes. 
For the first cycle elementary students, comparing the error rate obtained at the beginning and at the end of 
the experiment, we note an average error rate variation of: 
(1) 16.22% of all types of errors, for the students with severe learning difficulties; 
(2) 6% of orthography errors, for all the first cycle students; 
(3) 13.98% of orthography errors, for students with severe learning difficulties. 
For the second cycle elementary students, comparing the error rate obtained at the beginning and at the 
end of the experiment, we note an average error rate variation of: 
(1) 13.39% of all types of errors, for the students with severe learning difficulties; 
(2) 7.61% of orthography errors, for all the second cycle students; 
(3) 13.22% of orthography errors, for students with severe learning difficulties. 
For the third cycle elementary students, comparing the error rate obtained at the beginning and at the end 
of the experiment, we note an average error rate variation of: 
(1) 7.83% of all types of errors, for the students with severe learning difficulties; 
(2) 5.37% of orthography errors, for all the third cycle students; 
(3) 6.39% of orthography errors, for students with severe learning difficulties. 
These results confirm what a longitudinal study had already shown: Flexible grouping in writing would 
promote the development of competencies. In their study, the most important progress was reported for the 
students profiting from flexible groupings from the first grade and this, during the five years the research lasted 
(Castle et al., 2005). We combined the flexible groupings with the explicit teaching of writing, a method which 
had many times shown its effectiveness in the development of the competencies of the students with learning 
difficulties (Swanson & Hoskyn, 1998; Gauthier et al., 2004). Indeed, in our study, the positive effects of the 
combination of flexible grouping, associated with the explicit teaching of writing are particularly clear in the 
subgroups of students with learning difficulties or severe learning difficulty in writing. 
In reference to the second objective of the research, the teachers developed a concerted planning approach
182 DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 
and changes were observed in their pedagogical practices. Indeed, the teachers systematically used various 
teaching strategies that implied the seven stages of the explicit teaching, while teaching their regular classes. 
Besides, certain teaching strategies, as the explicit teaching strategies of the students’ self-assessment, were 
once again explained in the regular classes and frequently used by the students. As the same strategies were 
generalized in all the groups of a cycle, all the students could work with the same strategies and thus be more 
competent in writing. Formerly, each teacher showed his/her students a self-assessment procedure that was 
different from that of his/her colleagues in the same cycle. The fact that the teachers shared their pedagogical 
practices favoured transfers and learning consolidation from one year to another and from one cycle to the next. 
The monthly guidance meetings, where a reflexive analysis of the pedagogical practices used, also 
contributed to the teachers and the learning specialists’ professional development; to the instauration of 
generalized practices in all the school; and to the development of a consensus about the notion of differentiated 
and explicit instruction. This project contributed to the integration and the success of students with severe 
learning difficulties by differentiating the groups two hours per week, proposing teaching situations that 
respected the students’ level of writing competencies and using the seven phases of the explicit teaching 
strategies in writing. 
Conclusions 
We observe that there are indeed positive effects on the development of the competence “to different types 
of texts”, when the flexible grouping is associated with the explicit teaching of writing. Furthermore, the results 
show a decrease of the average error rate when a writing task is presented to the students, and an increase in the 
number of words written between the beginning of the research project and its end. This increase of the level of 
competencies is mainly marked in orthography for the three cycles. 
The monthly guidance meetings and the exchanges regarding the pedagogical practices employed, 
favoured the conciliation among the teachers of a cycle and the learning specialist. Moreover, the 
pedagogical strategies were presented to all the students of a cycle at the same time, but differentiating the 
groups and the learning situations so as to respond to the students’ learning needs. This practice also 
favoured the transfer of the strategies previously learned in other writing situations when the students 
returned to their regular classes. In addition, the teachers of all cycles adopted the practices that they 
developed jointly during the concertation meetings. 
The positive effects are reinforced by the possibility of working with the students on a specific notion, 
taking into account their precise learning needs. As a consequence, the students’ attention is fixed on a writing 
strategy, one half-day every fortnight, in subgroups where the ratio teacher-student changes, according to the 
students’ level of competence. Small subgroups enhanced the exchanges, the interactions and the questionings 
as the students received answers adapted to their learning needs. 
Study Limits 
This collaborative research was implemented in only one elementary school. In order to be able to 
generalize the results, this research should be repeated in several different types of elementary schools: rural, 
urban, semi-urban, reputed, disadvantaged schools, etc.. Future research should also have a control group for 
each elementary cycle to further compare the evolution of the students’ competencies in writing.
DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 183 
Collateral Effects 
This project stresses the importance of collaborative research strategies at schools. They facilitate the use 
of the results of empiric studies adapting them to the students’ needs and to the teachers and school participants’ 
pedagogical purposes, thus bridging the gap between the research and the practice (Buysse, Sparkman, & 
Wesley, 2003). This collaborative research project favoured the school integration and the development of 
competencies in writing, having a particularly positive effect on the quality of learning and teaching, specially 
for the students with learning difficulties integrated to regular classes, who did not have to endure the negative 
effects of being taken out of the classroom for special education services, such as stigmatisation, loss of regular 
classroom instruction and lack of coherence between what is learned out of the classroom and what is actually 
done in class. 
Nevertheless, we recommend adjusting the subgroups whenever needed, so that they always respect the 
students’ needs and follow the progress that they make during the school year. This practice enhances the 
effects of the association of flexible grouping with explicit teaching and helps to respond positively to the 
learning needs of students with learning difficulties. In addition, it proves to be important to implement 
subgroups’ needs early during the elementary school and for several years. 
References 
Adamson, D. R., Matthews, P., & Schuller, J. (1990). Five ways to bridge: The resource room-to-regular classroom gap. Teaching 
Exceptional Children, 22, 74-77. 
Affleck, J., Madge, S., Adams, A., & Lowenbraun, S. (1988). Integrated classroom versus resource model: Academic viability and 
effectiveness. Exceptional Children, 54, 339-348. 
Bean, R. M., Cooley, W. W., Eichelberger, R. T., Lazar, M. K., & Zigmond, N. (1991). In-class or pull-out: Effects of setting on 
the remedial reading program. Journal of Reading Behavior, 23, 445-464. 
Bear, G. G., & Proctor, W. A. (1990). Impact of full time integrated program on the achievement of non-handicapped and mildly 
handicapped children. Journal of Exceptionalities, 1, 227-238. 
Baumgartner, T., Lipowski, M. B., & Rush, C. (2003). Increasing reading achievement of primary and middle school students 
through differentiated instruction. ERIC: ED 479-203. 
Beckman, P. (2002). Strategy instruction. ERIC: ED 474 302. 
Boyer, C. (1993). Explicit teaching for reading comprehension. Boucherville: Graficor. (in French) 
Buysse, V., Sparkman, K. L., & Wesley, P. W. (2003). Communities of practice: Connecting what we know with what we do. 
Exceptional Children, 69(3), 263-277. 
Castle, S., Baker Deniz, C., & Tortora, M. (2005). Flexible grouping and student learning in a high-needs school. Education and 
Urban Society, 37(2), 139-150. 
Dubé, F. (2008). Students with learning difficulties in regular classes: Analysis of school innovations (Doctoral dissertation, 
University of Montreal). (in French) 
Gauthier, C., Mellouki, M., Simard, D., Bissonnette, S., & Richard, M. (2004). Effectiveness of pedagogical intervention and 
school success for children in poverty: A literature review. Quebec: Laval University. (in French) 
Gross, J. (2002). Special educational needs in the primary school: A practical guide (3rd ed.). Philadelphia, P. A.: Open University 
Press. 
Gullatt, D. E., & Lofton, B. D. (1998). Helping at-risk learners succeed: A whole-school approach to success. Window with a 
View. School in the Middle, 7(4), 11-14, 42-43. 
Holborn, P. (1992). Becoming a teacher (Book 1 and 2). Montréal: Logiques. (in French) 
Hunt, P., Soto, G., Maier, J., & Doering, K. (2003). Collaborative teaming to support students at risk and students with severe 
disabilities in general education classrooms. Exceptional Children, 69(3), 315-332. 
Kuhn, M. (2004). Helping students become accurate, expressive readers: Fluency instruction for small groups. International 
Reading Association, 58(4), 338-344.
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Meese, R. L. (2001). Teaching learners with mild disabilities: Integrating research and practice. Stamford, C. T.: Wadsworth: 
Thomson Learning. 
Ministry of Education. (1999). Adapting our schools to the needs of all students. Government of Québec. 
Ministry of Education. (2001). Quebec education program. Government of Quebec. 
Ministry of Education, Recreation and Sports. (2007). Students at risk, with learning disabilities or behavioural disabilities. 
Government of Quebec. 
Radencich, M. C., & McKay, L. J. (1995). Flexible grouping for literacy in the elementary grades. Boston, M. A.: Allyn & 
Bacon. 
Reutzel, D. R. (2003). Organizing effective literacy instruction: Grouping strategies and instructional routines. In L. M. Dans, L. 
B. Morrow, Gambrell, & M. Pressley (Eds.), Best practices in literacy instruction (pp. 241-267). New-York: Guilford. 
Rosenshine, B. (1986). Teaching functions in instructional programs. In M. Crahay, & D. Lafontaine (Eds.), The art and science 
of teaching (pp. 304-305). Bruxelles: Labor. 
Schön, D. (1983). The reflective practitioner. Basic Books: New York. 
Slavin, R. E. (1987). Cooperative learning and individualized instruction. Arithmetic Teacher, 3(3), 14-16. 
Swanson, H. L., & Deshler, D. (2003). Instructing adolescent with learning disabilities: Converting a meta-analysis to practice. 
Journal of Learning Disabilities, 36(2), 124-135. 
Swanson, H. L., & Hoskyn, M. (1998). Experimental intervention research on students with learning disabilities: A meta-analysis 
of treatment outcomes. Review of Educational Research, 68(3), 277-321. 
Tomlinson, C. A. (2000). Differentiation of instruction in the elementary grades. ERIC: ED 443 572. 
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Form 6

  • 1. US-China Education Review B 2 (2011), 167-184 Earlier title: US-China Education Review, ISSN 1548-6613 Differentiation and Explicit Teaching: Integration of Students With Learning Difficulties France Dubé, Lyne Bessette, Catherine Dorval Université du Québec à Montréal, Canada This collaborative research was carried out among 197 elementary school students, in the context of a rural Canadian school of the Quebec province. Several students of the school presented learning difficulties, mostly in writing. The teachers and the learning specialist decided to differentiate the groups in special subgroups of needs that met for a half-day once a week; they also implemented the explicit teaching of writing. The results showed that there was an important improvement in all the students’ writing ability, especially of those with learning difficulties. Indeed, the subgroups of students with severe learning difficulties showed a significant reduction in the average error rate. The dialogue among the teachers, the learning specialist, the director and the researcher was a key component for the success of this project, which aims mainly to accompany the teachers and to encourage the effective integration of students with learning difficulties. Keywords: integration, differentiation, explicit teaching, writing, pedagogical innovation Problem According to various studies, the integration of students with learning difficulties into regular classes contributes to the learning process (Bear & Proctor, 1990; Gross, 2003). However, regular teachers felt this integration was a real challenge (Meese, 2001). In Quebec schools, students with learning difficulties are removed from their classroom and referred to learning specialists—orthopédagogue in French—for a specific number of periods or sessions (generally between 30 and 60 minutes) per week for remedial exercises or re-education. They may work individually or in groups of three or four students. This practice poses several negative effects—it stigmatizes the student leaving his/her classroom to receive a special education service (Affleck, Madge, Adams, & Lowenbraun, 1988); the student misses regular classroom instruction (Bean, Cooley, Eichelberger, Lazar, & Zigmond, 1991); the abilities and behaviours learned outside the classroom lack generalization (Adamson, Matthews, & Schuller, 1990); and there is a lack of coherence and coordination between the classroom teacher and the learning specialist regarding the content, teaching plan, material, terminology and strategy used (Slavin, 1987). In 2000, Quebec implemented an education reform, which states that the mission of the school is to help students succeed in terms of instruction, socialization and qualifications. A restructuring of the curriculum in elementary school is also proposed. The elementary level of education is thus divided into three two-year cycles so as to take into account the development of competencies implying long-term pedagogical France Dubé, Ph. D., professor, Special Education Department, Université du Québec à Montréal. Lyne Bessette, Université du Québec à Montréal. Catherine Dorval, Université du Québec à Montréal.
  • 2. 168 DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING interventions. The new competence-based education program respects the students’ learning rhythm and enhances pedagogical differentiation (Ministry of Education, 2001). The students now have two years to develop the competencies they need to move onto the next cycle. The elementary level hence is divided into three two-year cycles: the first cycle of the elementary school (i.e., grades one and two), the second cycle of the elementary school (i.e., grades three and four), and the third cycle of the elementary school (i.e., grades five and six). At the end of each cycle, the teacher writes a competence report to determine each student’s progress. Students are considered to have learning difficulties when the analysis of their situation shows that the remedial instruction measures implemented by the teacher or other school stakeholders during a significant period of time, have not allowed him/her to achieve the minimal educational requirements for the cycle either in mathematics or in the language of instruction (Ministry of Education, Recreation and Sport, 2007). It is important to specify that Quebec special education policies favours the integration of disabled students, who are with learning difficulties or adjustment difficulties (Ministry of Education, 1999). However, teachers feel that it is a really difficult responsibility due to the complexity of the task, as they have to teach a class where there are students with a variety of difficulties and they are also responsible for the individual follow-up. In order to support the integration of students with difficulties and attain their learning needs while developing the reading, writing and mathematics competencies expected at their level, the educational milieu has to innovate. The general research question is as follows: What innovating services can favour the mainstreaming and the development of the writing competencies of elementary school children with difficulties? Framework of Reference In a previous study that examined and described various innovative teaching methods contributing to the success of students with learning difficulties integrated to elementary school regular classes, differentiation, flexible grouping, direct teaching and explicit teaching have proven to be effective (Dubé, 2008). Empirical studies have already analysed the flexible grouping, the explicit teaching and their effect on the development of competencies in elementary schools and more particularly among students with learning difficulties. Flexible Grouping Flexible grouping strategies are based on Vygotsky’s socio-constructivist conceptual model, which recognizes the contribution of the peers’ influence and the teachers’ intervention in the learning process. Groups are organized so as to meet the students’ individual and changing needs. The teachers organize them taking into account the students’ strengths and difficulties. In this context, subgroups are formed and dissolved to fit the students’ learning needs. The subgroups of needs comprised a variable number of students and they respected the specific needs of the students of one or more classes (Reutzel, 2003). Tomlinson (2000) suggested that the subgroups of needs helped teachers achieve an overall picture of the students; this overview can evolve and be evaluated in different learning contexts. The use of various materials, different levels of difficulties and activities based upon the students’ interests are practices that should always be privileged. She suggested that differentiated instruction should allow flexible grouping in order to grant different learning contexts. In the United States, Castle, Baker, and Tortora (2005) have studied the flexible grouping in an elementary school of 435 students in order to evaluate its impact on students’ basic knowledge. The research lasted five years, during which the researchers assessed the students’ progress in reading and writing skills by means of
  • 3. DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 169 standardized assessment tools. The researchers also studied the way in which flexible grouping was implemented, and to do so they studied the classroom practices and interviewed the teachers. Notable progress was reported both in the students’ reading and writing competencies, when they profited from flexible grouping from first grade onwards, during which the research was implemented. Only 25% of the school teachers put into practice the flexible grouping at least once a week during the second year of the study, while there was 95% that put it into practice on a weekly basis during the fifth year. Seven out of nine interviewed teachers have observed positive effects on the students’ learning process. According to them, the positive effects are due to the fact that students can work on a specific notion connected to their specific learning needs while their attention is focused on a particular and specific objective. They have also reported a better concentration at work, when they are in small groups, as well as a higher motivation, more ease and self-confidence. These researchers stress that each teaching instance requires a particular consideration, when students having the same needs are associated within the framework of flexible grouping. They say flexible grouping contributes to individualized instruction, providing superior quality instruction to all students while eliminating the stereotypes that arise when students have to follow a particular learning path. The results confirm what other studies have shown regarding the positive effects differential instruction used in combination with flexible grouping has on reading (Baumgartner, Lipowski, & Rush, 2003; Radencich & McKay, 1995). The results show the positive effects of flexible grouping, particularly when groups are implemented for more than three years. Castle et al. (2005) précised that groups have to be constantly rearranged so as to always respect the specific needs of the students and the progress they made. The flexible groupings previously studied help differentiate the learning process, according to the particular needs of the students, whether they have a high level of performance or they experience learning difficulties. When the groups of needs are associated to a structured teaching practice, they help the acquisition of basic knowledge and school integration. In the next section, we have listed the empirical studies that examine the effects of explicit teaching on learning. Explicit Teaching Explicit teaching has its origins in studies made on effective teaching practices and is based on direct teaching. This research trend examines the teaching strategies and techniques used by expert teachers and thus empirically proven to be “efficient”. Some of the effects of explicit teaching—approach based on cognitive psychology—are the development of the students’ feeling of competence, self-confidence, more engagement and a greater feeling of responsibility. Students developed a better comprehension of their difficulties and applied appropriate strategies to overcome them (Beckman, 2002). Rosenshine (1986) divided the explicit teaching into three distinct and successive phases: Modeling, where the teacher makes demonstrations, making explicit the procedures and reasoning that would otherwise be implicit. Guided practice, where the teacher accompanies the students, organizing team tasks. Independent practice, where the teacher provides practice for seatwork exercise and pedagogical activities tied to previous learning, while reinvesting what students have understood during the modeling and the guided practice phases. (p. 305) In Quebec, Boyer (1993) developed an explicit teaching method for reading that helped the students
  • 4. 170 DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING become accountable for their own learning, as well as it made them be aware of the strategies they used and those they should have used; it recalls cognitive strategies and learning items trying to make them conscious. Its aim is to make visible the cognitive procedures put into practice, while they are reading. These meta-cognitive activities allow students to automate the decoding process, so that it becomes fast and accurate. We will briefly explain the explicit teaching model we have implemented during our research. It works as follows: Firstly, the goals of the activity and the expected level of performance are clearly defined, and the necessary previous basic knowledge is recalled; a few examples are presented and a demonstration is done; then the teacher asks a few questions and objectifies. Afterwards, students either work alone or in teams so as to use the strategies that they have learned. The teacher evaluates their performance and provides them feedback on the answers given and the strategies they have used. Finally, they revise and the teacher provides independent practice (Swanson & Deshler, 2003). According to several studies, the explicit teaching would be effective to favour reading, mathematics, grammar and the first language learning (Rosenshine, 1986). Likewise, it would also be effective to contribute to the success of students with learning difficulties (Swanson & Hoskyn, 1998; Gauthier, Mellouki, Simard, Bissonnette, & Richard, 2004). Our specific research question is: Up to what extent does the flexible grouping associated to the explicit teaching contribute to the development of competencies in writing of students with learning difficulties integrated to regular classes? Method Research Objectives This research has two main objectives: (1) The first objective is to contribute to the development of writing competencies of students with learning difficulties integrated to regular classes. This objective targets mainly the competence “write different types of texts” of the Quebec Education Program; (2) The second objective is to accompany the teachers in the development of a dynamics of pedagogical concentration and a reflective practice (Schön, 1994) towards the group differentiation for all cycles, and this, associated with an explicit teaching approach in writing. Research Development We implemented a group and teaching differentiation by establishing flexible groupings on a half-day per week basis associated to two hours of explicit teaching strategies in writing. These groups were not fixed, as they were constantly reconfigured to accommodate the students’ specific needs and the progress they made during the school year. As we have already specified in our framework of reference, empirical results show that explicit teaching can be particularly effective for students with learning difficulties (Rosenshine, 1986; Beckman, 2002; Swanson & Deshler, 2003; Gauthier et al., 2004); it also shows that the differentiation associated to a structured teaching program by means of flexible grouping favours the development of competencies of students with learning difficulties. In this project, the students with learning difficulties, as well as those with conduct disorders have taken part in all the activities at the same time as their peers. Our aim of collaborative research is to accompany the teachers and establish durable teaching practices adapted to the school needs, which will allow the development of an expertise in the participating school. By means of a reflective practice (Schön, 1994), the different school participants have decided together what the
  • 5. DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 171 students’ needs were at the beginning of the school year and they have followed the evolution of the first, second or third cycle students, planning differentiated explicit teaching activities every month during all the school year. Figure 1 presents a schematization of the teachers’ process of reflexive analysis. 1. Attention is focused on concrete situations that arise in our professional practice. (Awareness) 2. Identification of the factors that determine a particular situation. Resonance 3. Explanation of what happens during the development of the activity and formulation of hypotheses. (Explanation) 4. Development of a personal approach and experimentation in a new situation. Figure 1. Teachers’ reflexive analysis (adapted from Holborn, 1992). (Analysis) (Planning) The reflexive analysis essentially entails a continuous process of four phases: (1) becoming aware of pedagogical practices and describes them; (2) analyzing them; (3) explicating the actions and formulating the clues or hypothesis to better meet the students’ needs; and (4) guiding the students towards future pedagogical practices. These practices are experimented in new situations and subsequently analyzed; immediately afterwards, another cycle begins. These concentration and analysis models have empirically proven their success (Hunt, Soto, Maier, & Doering, 2003). Procedures At the beginning of the school year, the learning needs of the students of the three cycles were identified, and the subgroups of needs were established, taking into account their level of competence in writing. Then, the students named their groups: comets, meteoroids, suns, etc.. Students with severe learning difficulties benefited from the explicit teaching in subgroups of needs with a ratio of one teacher for every six students. For the students with less severe learning difficulties, and those who had already developed the required competencies in writing, the teachers proposed writing situations respecting their learning needs, always favouring explicit teaching strategies in writing. The more students the groups had, the better the students’ level of competence was. However, subgroups were flexible: Students could change subgroups at any time during the school year. Each teacher was responsible for a subgroup of needs. The learning specialist was responsible for the subgroup with severe learning difficulties in the first, second and third cycles. The monthly guidance meetings guaranteed the students’ follow-up and the researcher accompanied the
  • 6. 172 DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING school participants both in the organization of the flexible groupings (Tomlinson, 2000) and the planning of the explicit teaching approach activities, respecting the students’ learning difficulties which were determined by the teachers of each cycle (Beckman, 2002; Swanson & Deshler, 2003; Gauthier et al., 2004). In addition, every fortnight, the students and the teachers of the three cycles participated in flexible groupings associated to two hours of explicit teaching in writing. Data Collection A mixed method was used for qualitative and quantitative data collection: (1) To achieve the first objective of the research and evaluate the progress of the development of the students’ competencies, three writing tasks were designed to evaluate the students’ progress: one at the beginning (in October), another in the middle (in January) and the third at the end (in May). We could thus compare the results from the beginning to the end of the school year for every student of all subgroups’ needs; (2) To achieve the second objective of the research, a concertation and training day on explicit teaching was planned at the beginning of the school year with the teachers, the learning specialist, the principal, the research assistant and the researcher. We will now describe the explicit teaching model applied in our study: (1) Clearly define the goals of the activity and the expected level of performance; (2) Review of previous, prerequisite learning; (3) Present examples and do demonstrations; (4) Ask the students a few questions and favour the objectivity; (5) Make the students work alone or in teams to apply the strategies explicitly taught—this phase enhances the cooperation among the students of the subgroup; (6) Evaluate the students’ performances and provide them feedback on the answers given and the strategies they have used; (7) Do independent practice and revise. (Swanson & Deshler, 2003) Monthly meetings assured the follow-up. The teachers and the learning specialist wrote a fortnight journal so as to leave traces of the component skill “write different types of texts” done in the subgroups’ needs and also to write down the modifications the subgroups experience. The observations were written down in a structured way and all the participants used identical notebooks, so as to facilitate the future qualitative data collection (Van der Maren, 1996). Samples The sample was composed of 197 students, of whom 39 were of the first cycle in the second year, 80 were of the second cycle in the third and fourth years, 64 were of the third cycle in the fifth and sixth years. The school has 250 students in all but those attending kindergarten (five years old) and the first school year were not included in the research. Data Analysis Plan The data obtained in the tasks done in October (task 1), January (task 2) and May (task 3) were analysed, so as to determine the progress of students with learning difficulties and the data obtained was compared to that of the other subgroups’ needs. The complex writing tasks were corrected with the help of a uniformed and standardized assessment grid. The data were compiled and analyzed using Excel.
  • 7. DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 173 The teachers and the specialist wrote a weekly journal, which was mechanically analyzed with a word processor and the results for each teaching cycle were compared to trace the modifications made to each subgroup of needs. The data collected also allowed us to keep traces of the writing strategies employed as well as the phases of the explicit teaching planned for each one of the subgroups of needs. The results obtained in the competence “write different types of texts” were assessed as follows. One corrector, a graduated teacher and candidate to a Master in Education, corrected the three writing tasks with the help of an assessment grid based on Ministère de l’Éducation, du Loisir et du Sport (2004). We established five error categories: orthography, conjugation, agreement, punctuation and syntax. We counted the total number of words written by each student, as well as the number of errors for each category in order to calculate the error rate as follows: Number of errors (ne) Total number of words (nt) Error rate (y) Results y = ne nt * 100 Firstly, we will show the results of the three writing tasks for all the students differentiating their elementary level cycle. Secondly, we will present the results for each subgroup’s needs from the first cycle, the second cycle and the third cycle, specifying the results of each subgroup of needs, as well as the type of errors that they made in each of the three writing tasks. Finally, we will bring before the teachers the results obtained. The Students Figure 2 shows a reduction in the error rate for the students of the first, second and third cycles between the first and the second task. A slight increase can be observed during the third writing task. However, on average, there was a 5.45% reduction for the first cycle, an 8.1% for the second cycle and a 7.61% for the third cycle from the beginning of the school year to the end, for all types of errors. The vertical line illustrates the variances for each one of the activities. 33.78 38.22 26.26 18.29 27.65 18.26 28.33 30.12 18.65 50 40 30 20 10 0 1st cycle 2nd cycle 3rd cycle Error rate Average error rate by cycle Average error rate, activity 1 Average error rate, activity 2 Average error rate, activity 3 Figure 2. Students’ average error rate for the three cycles.
  • 8. 174 DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING The first cycle students. We will show the results of the three writing tasks of first cycle students. The subgroups’ needs were divided as follows: Subgroup 1 gathered the students with severe learning difficulties in writing, while subgroup 4 with the highest level of competence in writing. Figure 3 presents the average error rate in the students of all subgroups differentiating activities 1, 2 and 3. 55.55 35.33 32.69 22.42 14.55 30.58 17.46 16.19 39.33 38.19 26.79 16.58 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Subgroup 1 Subgroup 2 Subgroup 3 Subgroup 4 Error rate Average error rate of 1st cycle subgroups Average error rate, activity 1 Average error rate, activity 2 Average error rate, activity 3 Figure 3. The first cycle average error rate for all subgroups of needs. When we assessed the students’ results, we also compared the subgroups of needs among them. We found that those with severe learning difficulties (subgroup 1) had the greatest reduction in error rate, from 55.55% to 39.33%, a 16.22% reduction, and it is for all types of errors, from the beginning to the end of the school year. Figure 4 shows the total number of words written for each of the writing tasks in the subgroups’ needs. We observe an increase in the number of words written by all subgroups with a highest increase for the group of students with high level of competence. They wrote longer texts reducing a 5.84% their error rate. Figure 5 shows the error rate for each one of the three writing tasks, according to the five categories of errors. The results allow us to establish that the most important error rate reduction was observed in orthography, from 19.88% to 13.88%, an average reduction of 6% from the beginning to the end of the school year. When we analyze the results of the subgroups of students with severe learning difficulties, we confirm once again that the orthography errors are the ones that decreased the most, from 34.04% to 20.06% between October and May, an average reduction of almost 14% (see Figure 6). The second cycle students. In this section, we will present the results obtained in the three writing tasks of the second cycle students. The subgroups’ needs were organized as follows: Subgroup 1 had the students with severe learning difficulties in writing, while subgroup 5 had those with the highest level of competence. The Figure 7 shows the students’ average error rate for each of the subgroups differentiating activities 1, 2 and 3. During the school year, there was an important reduction in the average error rate of second cycle students’ needs. However, the increase of the error rate reported between the second and the third task for students in the
  • 9. DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 175 first cycle is not so noticeable for students in second cycle. If we analyze the results for the first subgroup of need—students with severe learning difficulties—they passed from an error rate of 51.14% to 37.75% from October to May. All the other subgroups’ needs have improved their competencies in writing. 150 125 100 75 50 25 Figure 4. Number of words written by the first cycle students while in their subgroups of needs. 19.88 9.58 13.88 6.90 3.56 3.93 2.43 2.44 2.00 2.69 1.87 6.38 1.79 0.83 2.15 30 20 10 0 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Orthography Conjugation Agreement Punctuation Syntax Error rate The first cycle students' average error rate All types of errors Figure 5. The first cycle average error rate according to the type of error. 0 Tâche 1 Tâche 2 Tâche 3 Mots écrits Sous-groupe 1 Sous-groupe 2 Sous-groupe 3 Sous-groupe 4 Average number of words written by each subgroup Subgroup 1 Subgroup 2 Subgroup 3 Subgroup 4 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3
  • 10. 176 DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 34.04 7.47 20.06 9.81 4.46 4.81 4.52 0.44 2.45 4.27 1.74 10.83 2.91 0.44 1.18 30 20 10 0 Activity 1Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1Activity 2 Activity 3 Orthography Conjugation Agreement Punctuation Syntax Error rate The first cycle students' average error rate Students with severe learning difficulties Figure 6. The first cycle students’ average error rate of students with severe learning difficulties. 51.14 46.92 38.33 34.30 32.21 36.58 34.07 26.13 26.74 21.48 37.75 32.56 30.35 28.01 25.71 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Subgroup 1 Subgroup 2 Subgroup 3 Subgroup 4 Subgroup 5 Error rate Average error rate of 2nd cycle subgroups Average error rate, activity 1 Average error rate, activity 2 Average error rate, activity 3 Figure 7. Average error rate of the second cycle subgroups’ needs. Figure 8 shows a significant increase in the number of words written for each one of the writing tasks for all the subgroups’ needs. However, we observe that students with severe learning difficulties are those who had the most drastic increase in the number of words written. It is also important to observe that they are the ones who made fewer errors in the third writing task. These results show an important improvement of the level of
  • 11. DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 177 writing competencies for the second cycle students with learning difficulties. Moyenne de mots écrits par chaque sous-groupe 250 225 200 175 150 125 100 75 50 25 0 Average number of words written by each subgroup Tâche 1 Tâche 2 Tâche 3 Mots écrits Subgroup 1 Subgroup2 Subgroup 3 Subgroup 4 Subgroup 5 Sous-groupe 1 Sous-groupe 2 Sous-groupe 3 Sous-groupe 4 Sous-groupe 5 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Figure 8. Average number of words written by the second cycle students while in their subgroups of needs. 19.95 12.21 12.34 7.00 7.58 5.70 4.17 2.42 2.75 4.03 2.78 6.07 3.13 2.66 3.26 Number of words 30 20 10 0 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Orthography Conjugation Agreement Punctuation Syntax Error rate The second cycle students' average error rate All types of errors Figure 9. Average error rate of the second cycle students, according to the type of errors. Figure 9 shows the reduction in the error rate, according to the type of error: orthography, conjugation, agreement, punctuation or syntax for all students in the second cycle, and this, for the first, second, and third writing tasks. We observe that for this cycle, the orthography errors are also the ones that significantly
  • 12. 178 DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING decreased the most, from 19.95% in the first task, to 12.34% in the third task, an average reduction of 7.61%. 28.26 18.56 15.04 9.67 8.40 8.72 3.66 3.32 2.53 4.74 3.14 6.86 4.80 3.15 4.60 30 20 10 0 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Orthography Conjugation Agreement Punctuation Syntax Error rate The second cycle students' average error rate Students with severe learning difficulties Figure 10. The second cycle average error rate of students with severe learning difficulties. Figure 10 shows that students with severe learning difficulties were the ones who saw their orthography error rate constantly drop, from 28.26% on the first activity, to 18.56% afterwards. On the whole, the average reduction rate was of 15.04%, for the first subgroup, which represents a 13.22% reduction in the error rate of orthography. It was also observed that the subgroups that reported most overall positive effects in the first and second cycles were those students with severe learning difficulties. 34.14 34.78 27.51 22.57 19.42 25.99 22.79 18.48 14.48 12.85 26.31 23.43 18.58 13.67 13.75 60 50 40 30 20 10 0 Subgroup 1 Subgroup 2 Subgroup 3 Subgroup 4 Subgroup 5 Error rate Average error rate of 3rd cycle subgroups Average error rate, activity 1 Average error rate, activity 2 Average error rate, activity 3 Figure 11. Average error rate of the third cycle subgroups’ needs. Error rate The third cycle students. As Figure 11 shows, all subgroups achieved, in average, an error rate reduction. However, for the third cycle, the students of the second subgroups’ needs—those who presented difficulties but not severe ones—presented the most significant drop in the error rate from 34.78% in October, to 23.43% in
  • 13. DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 179 May, an 11.35% reduction in the error rate. For the students with severe learning difficulties, we observe that the average error rate fell from 34.14% to 26.31%, a 7.83% reduction in the error rate. Figure 12 shows an important increase in the number of words written in each one of the writing tasks, and that for all the subgroups’ needs, except for the third cycle students with severe learning difficulties. Indeed, the learning specialist responsible for this subgroup had asked the students to limit the number of words to 200. Unfortunately, we cannot assert if there would have been a rise of the number of words written for this subgroup, without the teacher’s specific instruction. Moyenne du nombre de mots écrits par chaque sous-groupe 500 400 300 200 100 0 Average number of words written by each subgroup Tâche 1 Tâche 2 Tâche 3 Sous-groupe 1 Sous-groupe 2 Sous-groupe 3 Sous-groupe 4 Sous-groupe 5 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Subgroup 1 Subgroup2 Subgrou Subgroup 3 Subgroup 4 Subgroup 5 p 1 Figure 12. Average number of words written by 3rd cycle students while in their subgroups of needs. Mots écrits Nubmer of words The third cycle students, of all subgroups and considering the results of all students, saw their average error rate drop from 11.83% to 6.46% between the first and the third task, a 5.37% reduction in the error rate in orthography. For the other categories of errors we observe a 1% reduction of the average error rate (see Figure 13). According to Figure 14, the analysis of the results obtained by the students of the subgroup with severe learning difficulties in writing, once again shows a marked reduction in the error rate in orthography. In fact, the error rate drops from 16.96% in September, to 10.57% in May, a 6.39% reduction in the error rate in orthography. This reduction is more important than the average for all the third cycle students, but it is less marked than for the students of the subgroups’ needs with severe learning difficulties of the first and second cycles. For the other types of errors, few effects were observed. We note a minor increase of the punctuation error rate, a little more than 1%. Notwithstanding, the reduction in the error rate for the students in the third cycle is less important, not only in orthography but also globally. This can be explained by the fact that the third cycle students were more experienced writers and thus the effects of this methodology were not as marked as in
  • 14. 180 DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING the subgroups of the other two cycles. 11.83 6.57 6.46 5.75 4.57 4.39 3.58 2.35 2.58 3.85 3.05 3.45 2.54 1.63 1.70 30 20 10 0 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Orthography Conjugation Agreement Punctuation Syntax Error rate The third cycle students' average error rate All types of errors Figure 13. Error rate of the third cycle subgroups of needs according to the types of errors. 16.96 10.35 10.57 8.66 6.81 6.01 3.62 2.64 3.47 3.25 4.58 4.91 1.65 1.62 1.36 30 20 10 0 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Activity 1 Activity 2 Activity 3 Orthography Conjugation Agreement Punctuation Syntax Error rate The third cycle students' average error rate Students with severe learning difficulties Figure 14. Average error rate for the third cycle subgroup of students with severe learning difficulties. Error rate The Teachers The teachers, the learning specialist and the school principal wanted to innovate, so as to integrate all school students and help them with their difficulties. The researcher accompanied the teachers during the entire project so that they could go beyond their apprehensions: They had to delegate their students to another colleague of the same cycle, teach students that they may not know and thus had to adapt themselves to the students. It is important to point out that one of the guiding principles of this project is that teachers have to adapt themselves to the students’ learning needs. The journal recorded the strategies explicitly taught during the flexible periods. The teachers chose topics in relation with the simple sentences: types of words, agreement, punctuation, spelling, as well as outline writing. Every month, once the theme for the cycle was determined, each teacher had to plan a sequence of differentiated explicit teaching recourses for the subgroup’s needs he/she
  • 15. DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 181 was responsible for. The teachers noticed that all students, especially the youngest, were more motivated to participate in class, when they were in the subgroups. In addition, when they taught their own group of students, they could remark the positive effects of the subgroups, as the students used the strategies they had learned during the research project in every day writing situations, when they were in their own classes. Discussion A global reduction in the average error rate for all cycles was reported. The most important reduction is shown from the first to the second task, with a minor increase of the average error rate in the third task. This increase could be explained by the fact that the third writing task was significantly longer. Unfortunately, for the third cycle students with severe difficulties, it is impossible to determine the variation of the number of words written, as the experiment conditions were different due to a restriction of the numbers of words they could write. The first objective of the research was accomplished and the most important effects of our project association of the flexible grouping with the explicit teaching in writing were obtained for the first and the second cycles, and this is, particularly for the students with severe difficulties. These students did fewer errors, despite they wrote longer texts. In the following, we will present a synthesis of some of the most significant outcomes. For the first cycle elementary students, comparing the error rate obtained at the beginning and at the end of the experiment, we note an average error rate variation of: (1) 16.22% of all types of errors, for the students with severe learning difficulties; (2) 6% of orthography errors, for all the first cycle students; (3) 13.98% of orthography errors, for students with severe learning difficulties. For the second cycle elementary students, comparing the error rate obtained at the beginning and at the end of the experiment, we note an average error rate variation of: (1) 13.39% of all types of errors, for the students with severe learning difficulties; (2) 7.61% of orthography errors, for all the second cycle students; (3) 13.22% of orthography errors, for students with severe learning difficulties. For the third cycle elementary students, comparing the error rate obtained at the beginning and at the end of the experiment, we note an average error rate variation of: (1) 7.83% of all types of errors, for the students with severe learning difficulties; (2) 5.37% of orthography errors, for all the third cycle students; (3) 6.39% of orthography errors, for students with severe learning difficulties. These results confirm what a longitudinal study had already shown: Flexible grouping in writing would promote the development of competencies. In their study, the most important progress was reported for the students profiting from flexible groupings from the first grade and this, during the five years the research lasted (Castle et al., 2005). We combined the flexible groupings with the explicit teaching of writing, a method which had many times shown its effectiveness in the development of the competencies of the students with learning difficulties (Swanson & Hoskyn, 1998; Gauthier et al., 2004). Indeed, in our study, the positive effects of the combination of flexible grouping, associated with the explicit teaching of writing are particularly clear in the subgroups of students with learning difficulties or severe learning difficulty in writing. In reference to the second objective of the research, the teachers developed a concerted planning approach
  • 16. 182 DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING and changes were observed in their pedagogical practices. Indeed, the teachers systematically used various teaching strategies that implied the seven stages of the explicit teaching, while teaching their regular classes. Besides, certain teaching strategies, as the explicit teaching strategies of the students’ self-assessment, were once again explained in the regular classes and frequently used by the students. As the same strategies were generalized in all the groups of a cycle, all the students could work with the same strategies and thus be more competent in writing. Formerly, each teacher showed his/her students a self-assessment procedure that was different from that of his/her colleagues in the same cycle. The fact that the teachers shared their pedagogical practices favoured transfers and learning consolidation from one year to another and from one cycle to the next. The monthly guidance meetings, where a reflexive analysis of the pedagogical practices used, also contributed to the teachers and the learning specialists’ professional development; to the instauration of generalized practices in all the school; and to the development of a consensus about the notion of differentiated and explicit instruction. This project contributed to the integration and the success of students with severe learning difficulties by differentiating the groups two hours per week, proposing teaching situations that respected the students’ level of writing competencies and using the seven phases of the explicit teaching strategies in writing. Conclusions We observe that there are indeed positive effects on the development of the competence “to different types of texts”, when the flexible grouping is associated with the explicit teaching of writing. Furthermore, the results show a decrease of the average error rate when a writing task is presented to the students, and an increase in the number of words written between the beginning of the research project and its end. This increase of the level of competencies is mainly marked in orthography for the three cycles. The monthly guidance meetings and the exchanges regarding the pedagogical practices employed, favoured the conciliation among the teachers of a cycle and the learning specialist. Moreover, the pedagogical strategies were presented to all the students of a cycle at the same time, but differentiating the groups and the learning situations so as to respond to the students’ learning needs. This practice also favoured the transfer of the strategies previously learned in other writing situations when the students returned to their regular classes. In addition, the teachers of all cycles adopted the practices that they developed jointly during the concertation meetings. The positive effects are reinforced by the possibility of working with the students on a specific notion, taking into account their precise learning needs. As a consequence, the students’ attention is fixed on a writing strategy, one half-day every fortnight, in subgroups where the ratio teacher-student changes, according to the students’ level of competence. Small subgroups enhanced the exchanges, the interactions and the questionings as the students received answers adapted to their learning needs. Study Limits This collaborative research was implemented in only one elementary school. In order to be able to generalize the results, this research should be repeated in several different types of elementary schools: rural, urban, semi-urban, reputed, disadvantaged schools, etc.. Future research should also have a control group for each elementary cycle to further compare the evolution of the students’ competencies in writing.
  • 17. DIFFERENTIATION AND EXPLICIT TEACHING 183 Collateral Effects This project stresses the importance of collaborative research strategies at schools. They facilitate the use of the results of empiric studies adapting them to the students’ needs and to the teachers and school participants’ pedagogical purposes, thus bridging the gap between the research and the practice (Buysse, Sparkman, & Wesley, 2003). This collaborative research project favoured the school integration and the development of competencies in writing, having a particularly positive effect on the quality of learning and teaching, specially for the students with learning difficulties integrated to regular classes, who did not have to endure the negative effects of being taken out of the classroom for special education services, such as stigmatisation, loss of regular classroom instruction and lack of coherence between what is learned out of the classroom and what is actually done in class. Nevertheless, we recommend adjusting the subgroups whenever needed, so that they always respect the students’ needs and follow the progress that they make during the school year. This practice enhances the effects of the association of flexible grouping with explicit teaching and helps to respond positively to the learning needs of students with learning difficulties. In addition, it proves to be important to implement subgroups’ needs early during the elementary school and for several years. References Adamson, D. R., Matthews, P., & Schuller, J. (1990). Five ways to bridge: The resource room-to-regular classroom gap. Teaching Exceptional Children, 22, 74-77. Affleck, J., Madge, S., Adams, A., & Lowenbraun, S. (1988). Integrated classroom versus resource model: Academic viability and effectiveness. Exceptional Children, 54, 339-348. Bean, R. M., Cooley, W. W., Eichelberger, R. T., Lazar, M. K., & Zigmond, N. (1991). In-class or pull-out: Effects of setting on the remedial reading program. Journal of Reading Behavior, 23, 445-464. Bear, G. G., & Proctor, W. A. (1990). Impact of full time integrated program on the achievement of non-handicapped and mildly handicapped children. Journal of Exceptionalities, 1, 227-238. Baumgartner, T., Lipowski, M. B., & Rush, C. (2003). Increasing reading achievement of primary and middle school students through differentiated instruction. ERIC: ED 479-203. Beckman, P. (2002). Strategy instruction. ERIC: ED 474 302. Boyer, C. (1993). Explicit teaching for reading comprehension. Boucherville: Graficor. (in French) Buysse, V., Sparkman, K. L., & Wesley, P. W. (2003). Communities of practice: Connecting what we know with what we do. Exceptional Children, 69(3), 263-277. Castle, S., Baker Deniz, C., & Tortora, M. (2005). Flexible grouping and student learning in a high-needs school. Education and Urban Society, 37(2), 139-150. Dubé, F. (2008). Students with learning difficulties in regular classes: Analysis of school innovations (Doctoral dissertation, University of Montreal). (in French) Gauthier, C., Mellouki, M., Simard, D., Bissonnette, S., & Richard, M. (2004). Effectiveness of pedagogical intervention and school success for children in poverty: A literature review. Quebec: Laval University. (in French) Gross, J. (2002). Special educational needs in the primary school: A practical guide (3rd ed.). Philadelphia, P. A.: Open University Press. Gullatt, D. E., & Lofton, B. D. (1998). Helping at-risk learners succeed: A whole-school approach to success. Window with a View. School in the Middle, 7(4), 11-14, 42-43. Holborn, P. (1992). Becoming a teacher (Book 1 and 2). Montréal: Logiques. (in French) Hunt, P., Soto, G., Maier, J., & Doering, K. (2003). Collaborative teaming to support students at risk and students with severe disabilities in general education classrooms. Exceptional Children, 69(3), 315-332. Kuhn, M. (2004). Helping students become accurate, expressive readers: Fluency instruction for small groups. International Reading Association, 58(4), 338-344.
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