Information Literacy & ScholarlyCommunication: Intersections thatReinforce New Library Collections       a lively lunch pr...
Cathy Palmer (cpalmer@uci.edu)•Head of Education and Outreach, UC IrvineLibraries, 2001-•English, Comparative Literature, ...
•Access to authoritative, current, credible information•Quick and intuitive links from citations to full-text•Affordabilit...
•(Potentially) reduced cost•Commenting features•Intuitive links from citations to source materials•Access to continually u...
•Digital divide issues•Ability to transfer ownership or movecontent from one device to another•Habit and past practice
•Course reserves•Provide access through check-out ofdigital devices•Make e-publications easily accessiblefrom off-site
•Promote understanding of how scholars createknowledge•Interactive potential engages students increation of new knowledge•...
Julia GelfandApplied Science Librarian, UC Irvine         jgelfand@uci.eduThe Library Collections Side of theHouse: Promot...
Basic Library Context•Academic Libraries have & will continue to change•Less emphasis on collection building, even inresea...
More Library Issues•Products must support & encourage collaboration•Easy remote access 24/7 & available via differentmobil...
Elastic Trends•Library as Publisher actively expanding•Establishing and growing repositories•Promoting Open Access/Open So...
Introducing and Reinforcing Scholarly         Communication Principles•Leading by example•Retaining author’s rights to pub...
Future Planning•Library budgets are unlikely to grow & maycontinue to shrink – sustainability is critical•Users will not b...
Ownership vs. Access•Usage data dictating actions•Plain & Simple - Demand Driven Acquisitions –deferred buying at time of ...
Libraries are still buying… but what? •Affordable content •Scholarly emphasis for local needs •Credible authors / publishi...
Hints for Publishers & Vendors•Concurrent release of print & online•Immediate availability of MARC records attime of promo...
Your TurnHow has information literacy influencedscholarly communication?How has scholarly publishinginfluenced information...
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Information Literacy and Scholarly Communication

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Information Literacy and Scholarly Communication

  1. 1. Information Literacy & ScholarlyCommunication: Intersections thatReinforce New Library Collections a lively lunch presentation by Joel Claypool, Claypool and Morgan Julia Gelfand, Univ. of California, Irvine Sylvia Miller, Univ. of North Carolina Press Cathy Palmer, Univ. of California, Irvine Charleston Conference 5 November 2011
  2. 2. Cathy Palmer (cpalmer@uci.edu)•Head of Education and Outreach, UC IrvineLibraries, 2001-•English, Comparative Literature, and ClassicsLibrarian, 1990-2001, UC IrvineOne of my favorite quotes: "Anyone who does research knows you have to stay focused on your topic and not go down every interesting avenue you pass, or you will end up wandering endlessly in attention deficit limbo." Ian Frazier, New Yorker, April 25, 2005
  3. 3. •Access to authoritative, current, credible information•Quick and intuitive links from citations to full-text•Affordability•Portability and ownership•Tools that guide them toauthoritative, current, credible information•Tools that help them document their sources andavoid academic dishonesty
  4. 4. •(Potentially) reduced cost•Commenting features•Intuitive links from citations to source materials•Access to continually updated materials•Tools that guide them to authoritative, current, credibleinformation•Affordability•Portability and ownership•Tools that help them document their sources and avoidacademic dishonesty
  5. 5. •Digital divide issues•Ability to transfer ownership or movecontent from one device to another•Habit and past practice
  6. 6. •Course reserves•Provide access through check-out ofdigital devices•Make e-publications easily accessiblefrom off-site
  7. 7. •Promote understanding of how scholars createknowledge•Interactive potential engages students increation of new knowledge•Evaluative tools can teach fundamental ILconcepts—authority, credibility, use of originalmaterial to create newinterpretations, importance of providingattribution for sources used
  8. 8. Julia GelfandApplied Science Librarian, UC Irvine jgelfand@uci.eduThe Library Collections Side of theHouse: Promoting Best Scholarly Communication Practices
  9. 9. Basic Library Context•Academic Libraries have & will continue to change•Less emphasis on collection building, even inresearch libraries•Physical space may shrink or morph into moreopen purposed ―commons‖•Associated costs are driving factor—less $$ now &predicted for the future•Selection being replaced by user demands•Discovery is the new game•Desire to influence new output•More emphasis on digitizing local content
  10. 10. More Library Issues•Products must support & encourage collaboration•Easy remote access 24/7 & available via differentmobile devices•Links to relevant information w/o intervention•Citation to content is clear, highly visible, andtransfers when copied or dowloaded•Incorporates multi-media as appropriate•Libraries have less capacity to process materials—shelf-ready, plug-in•Wikipedia & Google formats attract users
  11. 11. Elastic Trends•Library as Publisher actively expanding•Establishing and growing repositories•Promoting Open Access/Open Source options•Print on Demand stations or ordering as needed•Implementing and promoting public access policies •Federal mandates (NIH, etc) •Public Advocacy•Integrating more eFormats (video, film, sound, etc)yet format agnostic•Challenging subscription models, embargoes,barriers to access
  12. 12. Introducing and Reinforcing Scholarly Communication Principles•Leading by example•Retaining author’s rights to publish in institutionaland/or discipline repositories – less buy back offaculty work•Considering Open Access options•Promoting Shared Resources•Encouraging ―Model License‖ language•Enforcing copyright•Emphasizing cost containment
  13. 13. Future Planning•Library budgets are unlikely to grow & maycontinue to shrink – sustainability is critical•Users will not become more avid readers butcontinue to treat everything as a ―reference tool‖ forselective searching, finding, browsing•Libraries seek new models & products•Encouraging more born digital content rather thanlegacy of post-print aftermath
  14. 14. Ownership vs. Access•Usage data dictating actions•Plain & Simple - Demand Driven Acquisitions –deferred buying at time of need for both print & e•Network directed - expanded holdings via OCLCLocal or other federations•Business models are ROI focused•Acquisitions – changes from Approval Plan profilingthat was publisher-based; today many new sources•Concerns about ―in-print‖ availability
  15. 15. Libraries are still buying… but what? •Affordable content •Scholarly emphasis for local needs •Credible authors / publishing sources •Promotes appropriate technology use •Accompanied by library friendly license •Well packaged •Has staying power
  16. 16. Hints for Publishers & Vendors•Concurrent release of print & online•Immediate availability of MARC records attime of promotion•Better understanding of ―just in case‖ vs ―justin time‖ actions where service is key in boththe collection and delivery•Chapter level browsing is not sufficient•Depreciation is the forensic metric for buyingolder releases•Reasonable pricing•More flexible and faster service – Amazonlike rush services – direct to users
  17. 17. Your TurnHow has information literacy influencedscholarly communication?How has scholarly publishinginfluenced information literacy?What alignments do you see betweeninformation literacy, scholarlycommunication, and scholarlypublishing?
  18. 18. Thanks for joining us!

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