DIVERSITY & CSR.
CBSR-CIDI Webinar.
March 6, 2014.
Cathy Gallagher-Louisy,
Director, Community Partnerships and Knowledge ...
Agenda for Today’s Session.
• About CBSR & CIDI.
• Defining Diversity & Inclusion.
• What does Diversity have to do with C...
About CBSR.
Founded in 1995, Canadian Business for Social Responsibility
(CBSR) is a non-profit member organization with a...
About CIDI.
The Canadian Institute of Diversity and Inclusion is a
national non-profit organization that provides:
• netwo...
DEFINING “DIVERSITY &
INCLUSION”.
“We do not see things as they are,
we see things as we are.”
-Anais Nin.
What is Diversity?
di·ver·si·ty:
1. the state or fact of being diverse;
difference; unlikeness.
2. variety; multiformity.
...
What is Inclusion?
in·clu·sion:
1. the act of including.
2. the state of being included.
Diversity and Inclusion Defined.
• Diversity is about Difference.
Diversity and Inclusion Defined.
• Diversity is about Difference.
• Inclusion is about Including.
Diversity and Inclusion Defined.
Difference.Including
• Diversity is about Difference.
• Inclusion is about Including.
Diversity and Inclusion Defined.
DifferenceIncluding
Diversity has
sometimes been about
counting people.
Inclusion is abou...
Diversity Dimensions.
• Gender.
• Race/Ethnicity.
• Culture.
• Indigenous Peoples.
• Ability.
• Sexual Orientation.
• Age ...
Organizational Diversity Terminology.
• Diversity & Inclusion.
• Equity & Human Rights.
• Equality.
• Accessibility.
• Ant...
Verbiage is Important.
Inclusion
vs
Tolerance.
Verbiage is Important.
Equality is giving everyone…
Equity is giving everyone…
Verbiage is Important.
Equality is giving everyone…
a shoe.
Equity is giving everyone…
a shoe that fits.
WHAT DOES DIVERSITY HAVE
TO DO WITH CSR?
“The real voyage of discovery consists not
in seeking new landscapes, but in havi...
Community
Environment Ethics/
Governance
Employees
Human Rights
CSR
Pillars of CSR.
Community
Environment Ethics/
Governance
Employees
Human Rights
CSR
DIVERSITY
Pillars of CSR.
Community
Environment Ethics/
Governance
Employees
Human Rights
CSR
DIVERSITY
Pillars of CSR.
Community
Environment Ethics/
Governance
Employees
Human Rights
CSR
DIVERSITY
Pillars of CSR.
GRI SOCIAL INDICATORS.
"Communities that include everyone
become stronger and everyone wins."
-Jane Imbody.
What is the GRI?
• Global Reporting Initiative.
• Used since 2000.
• Most widely used CSR/Sustainability
reporting framewo...
Labor Practices and Decent Work.
GRI Aspect: Employment.
Indicator G4-LA1
• Total number and rates of new employee hires a...
Labor Practices and Decent Work.
GRI Aspect: Occupational Health and Safety.
Indicator G4-LA6
• Type of injury and rates o...
Labor Practices and Decent Work.
GRI Aspect: Training and Education.
Indicator G4-LA9
• Average hours of training per year...
Labor Practices and Decent Work.
Aspect: Diversity and Equal Opportunity.
Indicator G4-LA12
• Composition of governance bo...
Labor Practices and Decent Work.
GRI Aspect: Equal Remuneration for Women and Men.
Indicator G4-LA13
• Ratio of basic sala...
Human Rights.
GRI Aspect: Investment.
Indicator G4-HR1
• Percentage and total number of significant investment
agreements ...
Human Rights.
GRI Aspect: Investment.
Indicator G4-HR2
• Total hours of employee training on human rights policies
or proc...
Human Rights.
GRI Aspect: Non-discrimination.
Indicator G4-HR3
• Total number of incidents of discrimination and correctiv...
Human Rights.
GRI Aspect: Security Practices.
Indicator G4-HR7
• Percentage of security personnel trained in the
organizat...
Human Rights.
Aspect: Indigenous Rights.
Indicator G4-HR8
• Total number of incidents of violations involving
rights of in...
Human Rights.
GRI Aspect: Assessment.
Indicator G4-HR9
• Total number and percentage of operations that have
been subject ...
Human Rights.
GRI Aspect: Human Rights Grievance Mechanisms.
Indicator G4-HR12
• Number of grievances related to human rig...
Society.
GRI Aspect: Local Communities.
Indicator G4-SO1
• Percentage of operations with implemented local
community engag...
Society.
GRI Aspect: Compliance.
Indicator G4-SO8
• Monetary value of significant fines and total number of
non-monetary s...
Society.
GRI Aspect: Grievance Mechanisms for Impacts on
Society.
Indicator G4-SO11
• Number of grievances about impacts o...
THE BUSINESS CASE.
“Most progressive corporations understand
that this is one of those instances where what
you think is t...
Changing Demographics.
• Canada has the highest rate of immigration of any of the
G20 countries, with approximately 250,00...
Financial Influence.
The Business Case – Customers
-
Group Purchasing Power
Women Women account for almost 50% of the Cana...
Quiz.
In what school year did women start to account for more
than 50% of undergraduate degrees?
Quiz.
In what school year did women start to account for more
than 50% of undergraduate degrees?
1979-1980
Women in Canadian Business.
Catalyst. Pyramid: Canadian Women in Business. New York: Catalyst, March 3, 2014.
Women in Canadian Business.
WHY FOCUS ON MANAGING
DIVERSITY?
"Inclusion and accessibility are basic
pillars of everyday democracy.”
- Michael Brigugli...
Leader acknowledges and
supports cultural difference.
Cultural difference becomes an
asset to performance.
Effectiveness i...
Bottom Line Impacts.
Increase revenues.
Embracing diversity can help increase revenues by:
• Attracting new customers and ...
Bottom Line Impacts.
Reduce costs.
Fostering a diverse and inclusive environment will help
your company reduce costs by;
•...
Bottom Line Impacts.
Increase Productivity.
Cultivating a diverse and inclusive work environment
ensures that you get the ...
THE BELLALIANT STORY.
"Inclusion elevates all."
Elaine Hall.
Bell Aliant – Who We Are.
• Created July 7, 2006, Bell Aliant is one
of the largest regionally focused
communications serv...
The Bell Aliant Diversity Story.
• Diversity is part of our Corporate Social Responsibility
Report.
• Our objective is to ...
The Bell Aliant Diversity Story.
• Bell Aliant Diversity Committee
• Diverse group of union employees and
Managers.
• Focu...
The Bell Aliant Diversity Story.
In 2013 focused on our recruitment strategies;
• Ensuring we are getting diverse candidat...
HOW CANADIAN
ORGANIZATIONS MEASURE
DIVERSITY & INCLUSION.
Full report:
http://www.cidi-icdi.ca/?page_id=1331
“Hard metrics...
D&I is a Strategic Priority.
79.6%
Measuring Impact of D&I Programs.
18.8%
Using a Diversity Scorecard.
12.5%
Results of Using Diversity Scorecard.
Raised profile of D&I initiatives
among organizations’ leadership.
Diversity Scoreca...
Standard Measures of Inclusion.
1. Representation.
2. Recruitment, promotion, and turnover.
3. Employee engagement.
4. Inc...
Going Beyond Basic Measures.
Leading vs. Lagging Indicators.
Who is Accountable for D&I?
Senior Leaders.
All People Managers.
All Employees.
Successful Diversity Scorecards.
• Owned by the most senior leaders.
• Top leader is accountable.
• Top leader holds leade...
Successful Diversity Scorecards.
• Wide range data available.
• Leadership teams regularly review and understand the
score...
“If you don’t know who your people are,
how do you design a strategy to support
them?” ~Michael Bach
References (Purchasing Power).
• [1] MasterCard Worldwide, MasterIndex of Canadian Women Consumers (2006).
• [2] www.catal...
THANK YOU
Cathy Gallagher-Louisy
Director, Community Partnerships
and Knowledge Services
cathy.gallagherlouisy@cidi-icdi.c...
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CBSR + CIDI Webinar re: Diversity in CSR

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This webinar - presented March 6, 2014 - discusses how diversity is an important part of Corporate Social Responsibility, the Business Case for Diversity, and how to measure diversity initiatives.

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  • For ease of reference, throughout this presentation I’m going to use the following short forms. CSR for the entire realm of Corporate Social Responsibility & Sustainability. And D&I for the realm of Diversity & Inclusion, Equity, Human Rights, Anti-Racism and Anti Oppressive Practice. This will be a very introductory look at the linkages and synergies between CSR & D&I. For those of you very familiar with D&I some of the D&I info might be somewhat basic. For those of you very familiar with CSR, some of the CSR info might be somewhat basic. But I’m hoping you’ll all learn something by seeing the linkages and synergies and also learning more about the other realm which you might not be so familiar with.
  • It isn’t different from…It includes the SWAMIt MUST include the SWAM
  • My former boss, Andres Tapia put it this way: Diversity is the Mix. Inclusion is making the mix work. Whatever mix of difference you have in your organization.
  • Most people when they think about diversity, they think about ethnicity. We really need to broaden our definition of diversity so it’s not so narrow. Every organization has diversity. Even if you are not in a highly ethnically diverse area, you have people of different generations, genders, abilities, sexual orientations and socioeconomic status…. Among many other dimensions.
  • Different organizations use different verbiage to refer to diversity. For the purpose of this discussion I will use the term Diversity or D&I to refer to all these different organizational approaches.
  • I cannot tolerate the word tolerance. Tolerance means I will put up with you but I wont like it. I tolerate going to the dentist. Inclusion means I value you and you are accepted, respected, and a part of the group. Inclusion means you are as welcome as me.
  • GRI is a non-profit organization that promotes economic sustainability. The GRI reporting standard is the worlds most widely used sustainability reporting framework. Also known as ecological footprint reporting, environmental social governance (ESG) reporting, triple bottom line (TBL) reporting, and corporate social responsibility (CSR) reporting. GRI seeks to make sustainability reporting by all organizations as routine as, and comparable to, financial reporting.GRI Standards are based on United Nations and International Labour Organization conventions and developed through extensive global consultation with business, goviernments, NGO’s and members of the public. G4 has expanded guidance for reporting on human rights, local community impacts, and diversity metrics. GRI G4, launched 2013.For more info on the GRI, please go to Globalreporting.org
  • GRI G3.1, launched in 2011, has expanded guidance for reporting on human rights, local community impacts, and gender
  • GRI G3.1, launched in 2011, has expanded guidance for reporting on human rights, local community impacts, and gender
  • Report the percentage of individuals within the organization’s governance bodies in each of the following diversity categories: Gender Age group: under 30 years old, 30-50 years old, over 50 years old Minority groups Other indicators of diversity where relevant b. Report the percentage of employees per employee category in each of the following diversity categories: Gender Age group: under 30 years old, 30-50 years old, over 50 years old Minority groups Other indicators of diversity where relevant
  • GRI G3.1, launched in 2011, has expanded guidance for reporting on human rights, local community impacts, and gender
  • GRI’s Human Rights frameworks are comprised of the following:United Nations (UN) Declaration, ‘Universal Declaration of Human Rights’, 1948 ..United Nations (UN) Convention, ‘International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights’, 1966 ..United Nations (UN) Convention, ‘International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights’, 1966
  • A report on CBC from march 3, 2014 indicates 42% of Canada's biggest listed companies have no female directors.According to a Catalyst Study, Fortune 500 companies with 3 or more women on their board gain a significant financial advantage over companies without women on their board. This includes 73%+ return on sales, 83%+ return on equity, and 112%+ return on invested capital.
  • Report from Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives last year indicated that if we continue at the current rate of change, women won’t achieve equality for 228 years. Clearly we need to accelerate the pace of change.
  • Refer to website
  • Nearly 80% of organizations stated that diversity, inclusiveness, equity and/or human rights are considered a strategic priority within their organization.This is great right? Well we would hope to see 100%, but almost 80% is good. Right?
  • Less than 19% of organizations are measuring the impact, efficacy or ROI (return on investment) of their diversity, inclusiveness, equity and/or human rights initiatives.This is puzzling. How many other strategic initiatives does your organization NOT measure?Many organizations invest significant resources in D&I initiatives. Why would three fifths of organizations NOT measure something they consider to be a strategic priority? How can they know whether their efforts are effective or making an impact? This suggests a gap between Canadian organizations’ desire to see D&I as a strategic priority and the actual practices to back up that desire. For most organizations, anything that is truly a strategic priority has robust metrics to show efficacy or impact. Even more puzzling…..
  • Only 12.5 % of organizations are using a Diversity Scorecard. Why is this a problem?As we know – what gets measured gets done. What are the leaders of your organization paying attention to? Your strategic reporting or your scorecard, right?As D&I champions, we need to get better at showing our organizational leaders the value of our diversity initiatives.Let’s take a look at some stats from organizations that ARE using a Diversity Scorecard
  • What percentage of respondents who are using a Diversity Scorecard said that the Scorecard had raised the profile of their diversity, inclusiveness, equity and/or human rights initiatives among the organization's leadership?What percentage of respondents who are using a Diversity Scorecard said that it has become part of the strategic reporting for their organization?It’s hard to argue with 100%
  • Representation of diverse/under-represented groups by job levelRecruitment, promotion, and turnover statistics by demographic groupEmployee engagement scores by demographic groupDiversity-related or inclusiveness questions on employee surveys Human rights, harassment, or discrimination complaints Participation in training on diversity, inclusiveness, equity and/or human rightsParticipation in Employee Resource/Networking GroupsASK AUDIENCE - What do all methods 1 through 4 have in common? ANSWER: They all require the organizaton to have collected demographic data. Remember – just over half of organizations are collecting demographic data, and only 20 % were doThe O’Mara and Richter report “Global Diversity and Inclusion Benchmarks” indicates most of these measurements fall in the first and second quartile of global diversity initiatives.
  • lagging indicators measure of what has already happened in an organization, such as turnover, lawsuits and complaints, leading indicators predict what will happen with an employee’s experience, and those are more important than lagging indicators when measuring diversity and inclusion work. leading indicators may include whether the employee has a mentor or executive sponsor, or which employees are working on high-profile projects/clients.
  • These findings are compiled from amongst the literature review and the interviews conducted with Canadian diversity leadersOwned by the most senior leaders of the company. The top leader is accountable for the results and hold their leadership teams accountable.Leaders are involved in developing the scorecardThe results are relevant to the organization’s strategic goalsThe organization is ready for the measures
  • These findings are compiled from amongst the literature review and the interviews conducted with Canadian diversity leadersA wide range of year-over-year data are available on all aspects of the employee experience throughout all levels of the organization Leadership teams regularly read and understand the scorecardLeadership and managers understand how they can personally impact the resultsIt is communicated effectively and consistently through multiple communication methodsMeasures demonstrate efficacy and impact, not just list activities undertaken
  • What do you think is missing from my report?What else would you have wanted to know?Are there any other research topics that you would like to see from the CIDI?
  • CBSR + CIDI Webinar re: Diversity in CSR

    1. 1. DIVERSITY & CSR. CBSR-CIDI Webinar. March 6, 2014. Cathy Gallagher-Louisy, Director, Community Partnerships and Knowledge Services, CIDI. Cyndy Allen, Team Lead Consulting, Respectful Workplace and Diversity, Bell Aliant.
    2. 2. Agenda for Today’s Session. • About CBSR & CIDI. • Defining Diversity & Inclusion. • What does Diversity have to do with CSR? • The Business Case for Managing Diversity & Inclusion. • The Bell Aliant Diversity Story. • How Canadian Organizations are Measuring D&I.
    3. 3. About CBSR. Founded in 1995, Canadian Business for Social Responsibility (CBSR) is a non-profit member organization with a mission to accelerate and scale corporate social and environmental sustainability in Canada. Our mission: • Strategically bringing together stakeholders to collectively tackle key issues; • To be the most relevant sustainability business network in Canada; and • To influence progressive public policy towards our vision.
    4. 4. About CIDI. The Canadian Institute of Diversity and Inclusion is a national non-profit organization that provides: • networking & member support, • cutting edge new research, • practical strategies and tools, and • educational opportunities for leaders, HR and D&I professionals across Canada. Our mission is to help improve the overall inclusivity of the Canadian workforce. More info: www.cidi-icdi.ca
    5. 5. DEFINING “DIVERSITY & INCLUSION”. “We do not see things as they are, we see things as we are.” -Anais Nin.
    6. 6. What is Diversity? di·ver·si·ty: 1. the state or fact of being diverse; difference; unlikeness. 2. variety; multiformity. 3. a point of difference.
    7. 7. What is Inclusion? in·clu·sion: 1. the act of including. 2. the state of being included.
    8. 8. Diversity and Inclusion Defined. • Diversity is about Difference.
    9. 9. Diversity and Inclusion Defined. • Diversity is about Difference. • Inclusion is about Including.
    10. 10. Diversity and Inclusion Defined. Difference.Including • Diversity is about Difference. • Inclusion is about Including.
    11. 11. Diversity and Inclusion Defined. DifferenceIncluding Diversity has sometimes been about counting people. Inclusion is about making people count.
    12. 12. Diversity Dimensions. • Gender. • Race/Ethnicity. • Culture. • Indigenous Peoples. • Ability. • Sexual Orientation. • Age / Generation. • Socioeconomic Status. ... and many more ...
    13. 13. Organizational Diversity Terminology. • Diversity & Inclusion. • Equity & Human Rights. • Equality. • Accessibility. • Anti-Racism. • Anti-Oppressive Practice.
    14. 14. Verbiage is Important. Inclusion vs Tolerance.
    15. 15. Verbiage is Important. Equality is giving everyone… Equity is giving everyone…
    16. 16. Verbiage is Important. Equality is giving everyone… a shoe. Equity is giving everyone… a shoe that fits.
    17. 17. WHAT DOES DIVERSITY HAVE TO DO WITH CSR? “The real voyage of discovery consists not in seeking new landscapes, but in having new eyes.” – Marcel Proust.
    18. 18. Community Environment Ethics/ Governance Employees Human Rights CSR Pillars of CSR.
    19. 19. Community Environment Ethics/ Governance Employees Human Rights CSR DIVERSITY Pillars of CSR.
    20. 20. Community Environment Ethics/ Governance Employees Human Rights CSR DIVERSITY Pillars of CSR.
    21. 21. Community Environment Ethics/ Governance Employees Human Rights CSR DIVERSITY Pillars of CSR.
    22. 22. GRI SOCIAL INDICATORS. "Communities that include everyone become stronger and everyone wins." -Jane Imbody.
    23. 23. What is the GRI? • Global Reporting Initiative. • Used since 2000. • Most widely used CSR/Sustainability reporting framework. • Covers economic, environmental, social and governance performance. • 4,000+ organizations in 60 countries. • GRI’s G4 Guidelines Released May 2013. • More info at www.GlobalReporting.org
    24. 24. Labor Practices and Decent Work. GRI Aspect: Employment. Indicator G4-LA1 • Total number and rates of new employee hires and employee turnover by age group, gender and region. Indicator G4-LA3 • Return to work and retention rates after parental leave, by gender.
    25. 25. Labor Practices and Decent Work. GRI Aspect: Occupational Health and Safety. Indicator G4-LA6 • Type of injury and rates of injury, occupational diseases, lost days, and absenteeism, and total number of work- related fatalities, by region and by gender.
    26. 26. Labor Practices and Decent Work. GRI Aspect: Training and Education. Indicator G4-LA9 • Average hours of training per year per employee by gender, and by employee category. Indicator G4-LA11 • Percentage of employees receiving regular performance and career development reviews, by gender and by employee category.
    27. 27. Labor Practices and Decent Work. Aspect: Diversity and Equal Opportunity. Indicator G4-LA12 • Composition of governance bodies and breakdown of employees per employee category according to gender, age group, minority group membership, and other indicators of diversity.
    28. 28. Labor Practices and Decent Work. GRI Aspect: Equal Remuneration for Women and Men. Indicator G4-LA13 • Ratio of basic salary and remuneration of women to men by employee category, by significant locations of operation.
    29. 29. Human Rights. GRI Aspect: Investment. Indicator G4-HR1 • Percentage and total number of significant investment agreements and contracts that include clauses incorporating human rights concerns, or that have undergone human rights screening.
    30. 30. Human Rights. GRI Aspect: Investment. Indicator G4-HR2 • Total hours of employee training on human rights policies or procedures concerning aspects of human rights that are relevant to operations, including the percentage of employees trained.
    31. 31. Human Rights. GRI Aspect: Non-discrimination. Indicator G4-HR3 • Total number of incidents of discrimination and corrective actions taken.
    32. 32. Human Rights. GRI Aspect: Security Practices. Indicator G4-HR7 • Percentage of security personnel trained in the organization’s human rights policies or procedures that are relevant to operations.
    33. 33. Human Rights. Aspect: Indigenous Rights. Indicator G4-HR8 • Total number of incidents of violations involving rights of indigenous people and actions taken.
    34. 34. Human Rights. GRI Aspect: Assessment. Indicator G4-HR9 • Total number and percentage of operations that have been subject to human rights reviews and/or impact assessments.
    35. 35. Human Rights. GRI Aspect: Human Rights Grievance Mechanisms. Indicator G4-HR12 • Number of grievances related to human rights filed, addressed, and resolved through formal grievance mechanisms.
    36. 36. Society. GRI Aspect: Local Communities. Indicator G4-SO1 • Percentage of operations with implemented local community engagement, impact assessments, and development programs. Indicator G4-SO2 • Operations with significant potential or actual negative impacts on local communities.
    37. 37. Society. GRI Aspect: Compliance. Indicator G4-SO8 • Monetary value of significant fines and total number of non-monetary sanctions for non-compliance with laws and regulations.
    38. 38. Society. GRI Aspect: Grievance Mechanisms for Impacts on Society. Indicator G4-SO11 • Number of grievances about impacts on society filed, addressed, and resolved through formal grievance mechanisms.
    39. 39. THE BUSINESS CASE. “Most progressive corporations understand that this is one of those instances where what you think is the right thing to do and what is in your business interest, cross over perfectly.” - Ed Clark, president and chief executive officer of Toronto-Dominion Bank.
    40. 40. Changing Demographics. • Canada has the highest rate of immigration of any of the G20 countries, with approximately 250,000 people immigrating annually. • According to the 2011 Census, more than 20% of Canadians were born outside of Canada. • According to 2011 Census, Canada’s Aboriginal population grew to more than 1.4 Million. Statistics Canada
    41. 41. Financial Influence. The Business Case – Customers - Group Purchasing Power Women Women account for almost 50% of the Canadian workforce and make 90% of day-to-day household financial decisions. Visible Minorities Visible minorities are 15.3% of the total population and 15.4% of the total labour force. Spending power over $76 billion. Persons with Disabilities 62% of people with disabilities say they are likely to do business with companies that have a commitment to diversity and equal treatment of employees. 73% of people with disabilities are heads of household. Spending power is over $25 billion. Aboriginal Peoples There are now more than 10,000 businesses owned by Aboriginal people (up from an estimated few hundred in the late 1960's.) Spending power is over $24 billion. Lesbian, Gay, Bi-Sexual & Transgendered Spending power nearly $100 billion dollars. 74% of LGBT adults are likely to consider brands that support non-profits and/or causes that are important to them as a LGBT person. References at the end of this presentation.
    42. 42. Quiz. In what school year did women start to account for more than 50% of undergraduate degrees?
    43. 43. Quiz. In what school year did women start to account for more than 50% of undergraduate degrees? 1979-1980
    44. 44. Women in Canadian Business. Catalyst. Pyramid: Canadian Women in Business. New York: Catalyst, March 3, 2014.
    45. 45. Women in Canadian Business.
    46. 46. WHY FOCUS ON MANAGING DIVERSITY? "Inclusion and accessibility are basic pillars of everyday democracy.” - Michael Briguglio.
    47. 47. Leader acknowledges and supports cultural difference. Cultural difference becomes an asset to performance. Effectiveness in creative tasksLeader ignores or suppresses cultural difference. Cultural difference becomes an obstacle to performance. Monocultural Teams Less More Multicultural Teams Multicultural Teams - - -- --- - + + ++ + + ++ Why Manage Diversity? Source: Adler, N. J., 2002.
    48. 48. Bottom Line Impacts. Increase revenues. Embracing diversity can help increase revenues by: • Attracting new customers and finding new markets. • Building customer loyalty; retaining existing business. • Expanding your global growth strategy. • Improving success in crosscultural negotiations.
    49. 49. Bottom Line Impacts. Reduce costs. Fostering a diverse and inclusive environment will help your company reduce costs by; • Eliminating differential turnover across demographic groups. • Controlling relocation costs. • Minimizing litigation costs.
    50. 50. Bottom Line Impacts. Increase Productivity. Cultivating a diverse and inclusive work environment ensures that you get the most from your employees by: • Recruiting and retaining the top talent. • Maximizing productivity through flexibility. • Maximizing employee engagement. Engaged employees are more productive, provide better customer service, go above and beyond, and experience less absenteeism.
    51. 51. THE BELLALIANT STORY. "Inclusion elevates all." Elaine Hall.
    52. 52. Bell Aliant – Who We Are. • Created July 7, 2006, Bell Aliant is one of the largest regionally focused communications service providers in North America. • We serve customers in six provinces with innovative information, communications and technology services including voice, data, Internet, video and TV. • Approximately 6800 employees • 65% unionized and 35% non unionized
    53. 53. The Bell Aliant Diversity Story. • Diversity is part of our Corporate Social Responsibility Report. • Our objective is to “foster an inclusive work environment including increasing cultural awareness leading to more respectful and inclusive behaviors.”
    54. 54. The Bell Aliant Diversity Story. • Bell Aliant Diversity Committee • Diverse group of union employees and Managers. • Focused on Education • Black History Month • International Day for Persons with Disabilities • World Mental Health Day • International Day against Homophobia • Aboriginal Day • Asian Heritage Month • Aging and Health (World Health Day).
    55. 55. The Bell Aliant Diversity Story. In 2013 focused on our recruitment strategies; • Ensuring we are getting diverse candidates applying for our roles • Recruiting and advertising differently. • Educating leaders on how to be inclusive. • Educating leaders on the benefits of a more diverse employee population.
    56. 56. HOW CANADIAN ORGANIZATIONS MEASURE DIVERSITY & INCLUSION. Full report: http://www.cidi-icdi.ca/?page_id=1331 “Hard metrics are vitally important, but we need both qualitative and quantitative measures to tell the full story of where an organization is on its diversity journey” – Mary-Frances Winters.
    57. 57. D&I is a Strategic Priority. 79.6%
    58. 58. Measuring Impact of D&I Programs. 18.8%
    59. 59. Using a Diversity Scorecard. 12.5%
    60. 60. Results of Using Diversity Scorecard. Raised profile of D&I initiatives among organizations’ leadership. Diversity Scorecard has become part of the organization’s overall strategic reporting.
    61. 61. Standard Measures of Inclusion. 1. Representation. 2. Recruitment, promotion, and turnover. 3. Employee engagement. 4. Inclusiveness questions. 5. Human rights, harassment, or discrimination complaints. 6. Participation in training. 7. Participation in Employee Resource/Networking Groups.
    62. 62. Going Beyond Basic Measures. Leading vs. Lagging Indicators.
    63. 63. Who is Accountable for D&I? Senior Leaders. All People Managers. All Employees.
    64. 64. Successful Diversity Scorecards. • Owned by the most senior leaders. • Top leader is accountable. • Top leader holds leadership teams accountable. • Leaders are involved in developing the scorecard. • Results are relevant to organization’s strategic goals. • Organization is ready.
    65. 65. Successful Diversity Scorecards. • Wide range data available. • Leadership teams regularly review and understand the scorecard. • Leadership and managers understand their impact. • Communicated effectively and consistently. • Measures demonstrate efficacy and impact.
    66. 66. “If you don’t know who your people are, how do you design a strategy to support them?” ~Michael Bach
    67. 67. References (Purchasing Power). • [1] MasterCard Worldwide, MasterIndex of Canadian Women Consumers (2006). • [2] www.catalyst.org; Visible Minorities, quick takes (2008) • [3] A Business Case for Diversity, Dr. Jeffrey Gandtz, University of Western Ontario, Fall 2001, HRSDC • [4] U.S. Census Bureau, 2000; Witeck-Combs Communications/Harris Interactive poll, 2005; The National Organization on Disability/Harris Interactive poll of Americans with Disabilities, 2004 • [5] "Within Our Reach: Findings and Recommendations of the National Task Force on Technology and Disability," 2000; Simmons Market Research Bureau, 2000 • [6] The Impact of Employment Equity on Corporate Success in Canada, Kimberley Bachmann, March 2003 (Canada) • [7] Diversity Inc. 2001(U.S) • [8] The Aboriginal Population: The Current and Future State, Clint Davis, July 13, 2006 • [9] Power of the pink dollar: Does it pay to be gay-friendly. http://ca.finance.yahoo.com/blogs/insight/power-pink-dollar-does-pay-gay-friendly-164814018.html • [10] A Harris Interactive Study July 2011.
    68. 68. THANK YOU Cathy Gallagher-Louisy Director, Community Partnerships and Knowledge Services cathy.gallagherlouisy@cidi-icdi.ca www.cidi-icdi.caca.linkedin.com/in/cathygl @CatGL

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