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Measuring Cultures of Responsibility in the Life Sciences – Daniel Greene

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This is a presentation by Daniel Greene of the Center for International Security and Cooperation on "Measuring Cultures of Responsibility in the Life Sciences."

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Measuring Cultures of Responsibility in the Life Sciences – Daniel Greene

  1. 1. Measuring Cultures of Responsibility in the Life Sciences Daniel Greene, Ph.D. February 22, 2020 dkgreene@stanford.edu
  2. 2. Some potential RISKS of life science research: • Accidental release of pathogens & GMOs • Widely accessible knowledge and tools for creating pathogens and novel bioweapons
  3. 3. Some potential BENEFITS of life science research: • $1 trillion+ value • Profound improvements in healthcare, agriculture, energy, production Some potential RISKS of life science research: • Accidental release of pathogens & GMOs • Widely accessible knowledge and tools for creating pathogens and novel bioweapons
  4. 4. Some potential BENEFITS of life science research: • $1 trillion+ value • Profound improvements in healthcare, agriculture, energy, production Some potential RISKS of life science research: • Accidental release of pathogens & GMOs • Widely accessible knowledge and tools for creating pathogens and novel bioweapons
  5. 5. "The NSABB strongly believes that one of the best ways to address concerns regarding dual use research is to raise awareness of dual use research issues and strengthen the culture of responsibility within the scientific community. The stakes are high for public health, national security and the vitality of the life sciences research enterprise."
  6. 6. How do we know whether a program is effective? How do we observe a culture of responsibility in practice, or know when we have one? What are metrics that we could use to indicate the presence of a culture of responsibility, and ultimately to guide the development of programs and interventions?
  7. 7. How do we know whether a program is effective? How do we observe a culture of responsibility in practice, or know when we have one? What are metrics that we could use to indicate the presence of a culture of responsibility, and ultimately to guide the development of programs and interventions?
  8. 8. How do we know whether a program is effective? How do we observe a culture of responsibility in practice, or know when we have one? What are metrics that we could use to indicate the presence of a culture of responsibility, and ultimately to guide the development of programs and interventions?
  9. 9. Senior Research Scholar Megan J. Palmer • Interviews and focus groups with scientists, regulators, and students • Survey question development & validation • Analyses of large-scale datasets of scientific practice Program Manager Connor Hoffmann
  10. 10. "Of the many interventions that might be used to improve the culture of biosafety and biosecurity, educational and training interventions are among the most frequently employed or cited. Unfortunately, there has been little assessment of these interventions specifically directed at improving biosafety and biosecurity in laboratories.” (Perkins et al., 2018)
  11. 11. (Minehata and Shinomiya, 2010) “Was your understanding on the following aspects of the module developed?”
  12. 12. Is the goal… • To “raise awareness”? (Minehata and Shinomiya, 2010) • To provide training in “knowledge or skills”? (Chamberlain et al., 2009) • To change “workplace culture”? (Flipse et al., 2013) • To promote “social norms”? (American Society for Microbiology, 2005) • To promote “engagement”? (Atlas and Dando, 2006)

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