Fourth amendment tutorial

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Fourth amendment tutorial

  1. 1. The United States Constitution: Main menu SOCIAL STUDIES  US CONSTITUTION UNIT  MR. CASARELLA Help page
  2. 2. Main Menu: Fourth Amendment defined Probable Cause Reasonable & Unreasonable Help page SOCIAL STUDIES  US CONSTITUTION UNIT  MR. CASARELLA Quiz Video examples Next
  3. 3. Main Menu: SOCIAL STUDIES  US CONSTITUTION UNIT  MR. CASARELLA Fourth Amendment defined Probable Cause Reasonable & Unreasonable Help page Quiz Video examples Next
  4. 4. Main Menu: SOCIAL STUDIES  US CONSTITUTION UNIT  MR. CASARELLA Fourth Amendment defined Probable Cause Reasonable & Unreasonable Help page Quiz Video examples Next
  5. 5. The Fourth Amendment defined: Main Menu Next As stated in the Constitution: The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. Help Page Back
  6. 6. The Fourth Amendment defined: The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized. As stated in the Constitution: Translation: The Fourth Amendment is designed to protect Americans from violations of privacy in the form of searches and seizures of homes, cars, and other assets. It also covers unlawful arrest. Main Menu Next Help Page Back
  7. 7. The Fourth Amendment simplified: Under the terms of this amendment, law enforcement personnel can search if they have probable cause or reasonable suspicion . Main Menu Next Help Page Back
  8. 8. The Fourth Amendment simplified: Under the terms of this amendment, law enforcement personnel can search if they have probable cause or reasonable suspicion . What is Probable Cause? Main Menu Next Help Page Back
  9. 9. Probable Cause: Example of Probable Cause : A police officer can ask a driver to take a blood alcohol test if he or she is driving erratically. This is deemed reasonable because of the probable cause, and because drivers must sign a statement indicating that they are willing to submit to such tests in order to get a driver’s license in many states. Probable Cause is a standard that means 'more likely than not.’ Probable cause must be based on information provided to or already known by the authorizing official What is considered reasonable? Main Menu Next Help Page Back
  10. 10. Reasonable or Unreasonable: Reasonable: is a standard that a person has been, is, or is about to be engaged in criminal activity. It is a much lower standard than probable cause. Main Menu Next Help Page Back
  11. 11. Reasonable or Unreasonable: Example of Reasonable : If an officer believes that safety is at risk, he may stop and frisk a suspect for weapons, but not for contraband like drugs. Reasonable: is a standard that a person has been, is, or is about to be engaged in criminal activity. It is a much lower standard than probable cause. Main Menu Next Help Page Back
  12. 12. Reasonable or Unreasonable: Example of Reasonable : If an officer believes that safety is at risk, he may stop and frisk a suspect for weapons, but not for contraband like drugs. Reasonable: is a standard that a person has been, is, or is about to be engaged in criminal activity. It is a much lower standard than probable cause. Example of Unreasonable : A police officer cannot pull over a random driver and search his or her car for no reason, because this is an unreasonable search. Main Menu Next Help Page Back
  13. 13. Reasonable or Unreasonable: Example of Reasonable : If an officer believes that safety is at risk, he may stop and frisk a suspect for weapons, but not for contraband like drugs. Reasonable: is a standard that a person has been, is, or is about to be engaged in criminal activity. It is a much lower standard than probable cause. Example of Unreasonable : A police officer cannot pull over a random driver and search his or her car for no reason, because this is an unreasonable search. Main Menu Next Help Page Back
  14. 14. Real Life Example: Click anywhere on the video above to play Main Menu Next Help Page Back
  15. 15. Example in Schools: The Fourth Amendment applies to all citizens, including minors. Nonetheless, young people face greater challenges when attempting to exercise their rights. Additionally, young people don’t usually own property, so their privacy is reduced by the fact that adults often control the spaces they use. Parents might consent to a home search, just as the principal might permit locker searches at school. These conditions sometimes limit, but do not cancel out, the Fourth Amendment rights of minors. Click on the image above to view a student video modeling New Jersey vs T.L.O. Main Menu Next Help Page Back
  16. 16. Example in Schools: Click anywhere on the video above to play Main Menu Next Help Page Back
  17. 17. Quiz Page: In order to understand the Fourth Amendment you must know ‘probable cause’ and ‘reasonable suspicion’. DIRECTIONS : Identify the examples below as either ‘probable cause’ or ‘reasonable suspicion’. Example A: Officer Jones received information from a witness that a man was selling drugs near the playground. The officer approached the man and proceeds to search him for drugs… Click either Example B: Officer Jones was on a routine parole when a teenager spotted him and ran away in the opposite direction. Officer Jones went in pursuit and put the teenager into custody while he questioned him…. Main Menu Skip Help Page Back or probable cause reasonable suspicion Click either or probable cause reasonable suspicion
  18. 18. Quiz Page: YOU ARE CORRECT! In order to understand the Fourth Amendment you must know ‘probable cause’ and ‘reasonable suspicion’. Example A: Officer Jones received information from a witness that a man was selling drugs near the playground. The officer approached the man and proceeds to search him for drugs… Probable Cause Explanation : Because Officer Jones received information from a reasonable witness he has a probable cause to search the man for drugs Main Menu Next Help Page Back
  19. 19. Quiz Page: SORRY In order to understand the Fourth Amendment you must know ‘probable cause’ and ‘reasonable suspicion’. Example A: Officer Jones received information from a witness that a man was selling drugs near the playground. The officer approached the man and proceeds to search him for drugs… Probable Cause Explanation : Because Officer Jones received information from a reasonable witness he has a probable cause to search the man for drugs Main Menu Next Help Page Back
  20. 20. In order to understand the Fourth Amendment you must know ‘probable cause’ and ‘reasonable suspicion’. Example B: Officer Jones was on a routine parole when a teenager spotted him and ran away in the opposite direction. Officer Jones went in pursuit and put the teenager into custody while he questioned him…. Reasonable Suspicion Quiz Page: YOU ARE CORRECT! Explanation : Because Officer Jones received information from a reasonable witness he has a probable cause to search the man for drugs Main Menu Next Help Page Back
  21. 21. In order to understand the Fourth Amendment you must know ‘probable cause’ and ‘reasonable suspicion’. Example B: Officer Jones was on a routine parole when a teenager spotted him and ran away in the opposite direction. Officer Jones went in pursuit and put the teenager into custody while he questioned him…. Reasonable Suspicion Explanation : Because Officer Jones received information from a reasonable witness he has a probable cause to search the man for drugs Quiz Page: SORRY Main Menu Next Help Page Back
  22. 22. Help Page: SOCIAL STUDIES  US CONSTITUTION UNIT  MR. CASARELLA USING THIS PROGRAM : Click on the blue hyperlinks to navigate through the program The Next hyperlink will bring you to the next page The Back hyperlink will bring you to back to the previous page The Main Menu hyperlink will bring you to the Main Menu where you can choose which slides to view The Help Page hyperlink will bring you to this page if you need assistance in using this program Main Menu Help Page Back Next Main Menu
  23. 23. Credits SOCIAL STUDIES  US CONSTITUTION UNIT  MR. CASARELLA Student Voices Thanks to: Yashee Munshi & Luis Alvarez The End Click this link to go back to the Main Menu Designing this program was a lot of fun for me. I wasn’t quite sure how I was going to teach the concepts of the fourth amendment, but I feel it does a good job keeping the audience engaged with good interaction. Adding the multiple tutors was an important piece as the program supports more vicarious learning. I’m a very neat person who likes crisp lines, simplicity, and clarity. When I designed this program I think I chose the right schemes and borders to make it very clear to the audience while keeping it attractive. Young adolescents are very familiar with blue hyperlinks, so choosing this format over ‘buttons’ was an easy choice for someone who likes simplicity. The striking black borders bring a focus to the most important information. I tried not to put too much information on any single page to keep it clear and easy to follow. The videos are courtesy of youTube publications that my field test volunteers found interesting. I hope you enjoy the program: Email me if you have any questions…. [email_address]
  24. 24. Main Menu: SOCIAL STUDIES  US CONSTITUTION UNIT  MR. CASARELLA Fourth Amendment defined Probable Cause Reasonable & Unreasonable Help page Quiz Video examples Next

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