Successfully reported this slideshow.

#YVRSocial: Video Marketing Strategy with Karen Hopkins

1

Share

Loading in …3
×
1 of 28
1 of 28

#YVRSocial: Video Marketing Strategy with Karen Hopkins

1

Share

Download to read offline

Video Strategy Consultant Karen Hopkins walks us through why video strategy matters, and how to develop a framework for your video campaigns. For more details on #YVRSocial visit http://YVRSocial.ca

Video Strategy Consultant Karen Hopkins walks us through why video strategy matters, and how to develop a framework for your video campaigns. For more details on #YVRSocial visit http://YVRSocial.ca

More Related Content

Related Books

Free with a 14 day trial from Scribd

See all

Related Audiobooks

Free with a 14 day trial from Scribd

See all

#YVRSocial: Video Marketing Strategy with Karen Hopkins

  1. 1. Why Video Strategy Matters Karen Hopkins Video Content Strategist GoodStory.Org
  2. 2. 80%of internet traffic will be video by 2021 - Cisco
  3. 3. 81%of people have been convinced to buy a product or service by watching a brand's video. - Hubspot
  4. 4. 72%where both video and text are available on the same page, 72% of people would rather use video to learn about a product or service. - Hubspot
  5. 5. video for video’s sake
  6. 6. strategic video
  7. 7. tactic
  8. 8. strategy
  9. 9. succ yeah!

Editor's Notes

  • In Sydney there’s a company called Little Flowers. They deliver small posey’s daily throughout the Sydney CBD. If you work in an office, on any given week you’d probably see a number of these little flowers being delivered to your colleagues. They’re incredibly popular.
  • In Sydney there’s a company called Little Flowers. They deliver small posey’s daily throughout the Sydney CBD. If you work in an office, on any given week you’d probably see a number of these little flowers being delivered to your colleagues. They’re incredibly popular.
  • That was until a competitor entered the market; Little Succers. You guessed it, they do same day succulent delivery. I highly recommend checking out their website just to read their cheeky copy, they’re a really fun brand. But probably my favourite part about their branding is their tagline:
  • Because flowers die. Now this has really stuck with me. Sure you can spend your money on a lovely bouquet of flowers, but in a week or so, they’ll die. Giving a succulent on the other hand can bring joy for a whole lot longer.

    So today, I want to talk to you about why when it comes to your videos you should to stop wasting your money on those pretty bouquets of flowers, and why you should opt for succulents instead.
  • Video is really hot right now. You’ve probably seen stats like this—that by 2021 80% of internet traffic will be video. Or you know that Facebook is favouring video in newsfeed. Even LinkedIn has jumped onboard now allowing native uploads to the platform.

    So we know consumers must be hungry for it.
  • When you marry that with stats about how powerful video is: like 81% of people have been convinced to buy a product or service because they watched a brand's video.
  • OR that where both video and text are available on the same page, 72% of people would rather use video to learn about a product or service…

    There’s no wonder that everyone wants more video.
  • Now, do you remember when social media was the hot thing business? Everyone jumped on board signing up for their business facebook, instagram, and twitter accounts.

    Until you got these situations where a financial services company was like, “WTF are we supposed to post on our instagram account?”

    You either ended up with dormant social accounts that had zero activity, or accounts that were posting really irrelevant content to a particular platform and getting zero engagement.

    And then we kind of matured, and started focusing only on the channels that were relevant to our specific businesses or business units, and we also started getting a bit more platform specific with the type of content that we produced. Do know what I’m talking about?
  • It feels like this is where we are with video right now. Because we’ve seen all of these really exciting stats about how popular and how powerful video is as a marketing tool, there’s this tendency to think of it as a magic bullet solution. With many brands making video for video’s sake, just like they signed up for every single social account without really thinking about the relevance.

    So as video creators we’ll often get briefs that feel just like that. It might be “We’re having an event next month, so we’d like an event video”. And we might ask “ok, so why do you want to make to make a video”, “To post on our facebook page about how awesome the event was!” There’s no real purpose.
  • Or, there’s a tendency to think of video as a one size fits all approach, where a common brief might ask for deliverables like “We want 90-second version to put on our website, then a 30-second cut down version for facebook, and a 15-second cut down version for instagram”, “Ok so why do you want to put it on your instagram account?”, “Because more video content on our social channels!”

    These are both really shallow ways to think about video content.
  • So rather than just making video for video’s sake, I want to encourage you to slow it down and take a more strategic approach to video. To start with a clear communications goal, to not only make sure that you even need a video in the first place, but also to make sure that you make the RIGHT kind of video for those comms goals.
  • As a tactic, video IS incredibly powerful. But it’s powerful because it’s complex. And in order for it to perform, and be as powerful as it can be, there’s lots of components that need to be considered.

    So let’s look at a video as a succulent.


  • A video has all of these multi-sensory elements that make it a powerful medium for delivering a message.

    But it didn’t always look like this. We mustn’t forget about what happened underneath the surface that helped it grow to be this succulent.

  • Before the succulent was a succulent, it was a seed.

    So before your video even becomes a video, it needs to be a business or communications objective. What is the problem or opportunity in your business?

    Maybe you’ve released a new software product and your customer service team has been inundated with troubleshooting calls because your customers can’t figure out how to login properly. This is a problem.
    Or, you want to recruit new graduates to your business. This is an opportunity.

    Now for it to be a good objective, you’ll want to make sure it’s measurable; so decrease customer support workload by 40% within this quarter, or increase this years graduate applications by 30% compared to last years.
  • Next you have your audience. Or the soil around the seed.

    This includes looking at demographics, but ALSO where the audience is in the sales funnel when they come across the content; are they already your customers? Or in our student example, have they already heard about your business, or is this the first time they’ve come across your brand?
  • Next grow the roots; these are your key messages.

    To be clear, this root systems does not represent lots and lots of messages. This is a one strong key message that forms a solid framework for your content.
  • All of these elements are designed to help you determine what kind of tactic you’ll use to solve your objective.

    And at this point you might decide that you don’t even need video. Maybe you just need a better user manual for your new piece of software. Or maybe an outreach team that actually goes into universities would be more effective for your graduate recruitment campaign.

    But you’ll notice there was a number of steps that got us to the point where we can decide whether a video is the right approach in this case. Our seed, or objective, didn’t start out as simply “we need a video”.
  • Ok, so you’ve decided that yes, a video is the appropriate tactic for this comms objective, but before we decide what that content looks like, we first need to decide where you’re going to plant it. Which platform or platforms will host your video?

    Will it live in a highly trafficked, public garden, like Facebook or LinkedIn.
    Or are you creating this content for a more intimate audience, so would it be better off planted in your backyard, on your company website.
  • So now, we can water it with a bunch of cash and watch it grow!

    Kind of. Now we can set an informed budget by looking at all of these elements. In particular what is the value of these business objectives? How much is it worth to decrease the volume of customer support phone calls because it saves you staffing costs?

    We can also look at the shelf-life of the video to inform our budget, so if it’s middle of the funnel content that’s going to live on your company homepage for the next two years it might be worth investing a bit more money into it. But if it’s top of funnel, awareness content to live on social media, maybe you’d like to focus on quantity over quality.
  • Right. Now that we have a strong foundation, we’re ready to make your video. And hopefully you’re beginning to see a symbiotic relationship; how what happens below the surface, actually informs what happens above the surface.

  • Like how your key message can affect the video genre: if you’re hoping to show people how to login to their software, using an animation or screen capture video might be the best approach.
  • Or how your audience can change the genre: for your graduate campaign maybe having a talking head video of your grey-haired CEO isn’t really going to resonate with this demographic, so you might decide to go with a “Day in the life” style video featuring a grad who was recruited last year, or an “MTV Cribs” style approach, where a young staff member tours the grads around the company and shows why it’s such a great place to work.
  • Or how the platform can inform things like the length or visual style of the video, the content that works well on instagram for example, is probably not going to perform as well on LinkedIn.
  • Or because we know that on Facebook 85% of videos are watched without sound, in this case the platform would inform how we might prioritise telling a story using subtitles and other graphics, rather than relying on a voiceover.

    Likewise on your social platforms your more likely to be posting TOF, awareness content, which is going to be short in length, exciting, and eye-catching. But perhaps the content hosted on your website is MOF, and gives way for longer format content, with more detail and focus on storytelling.
  • You can see that there’s a lot of complex relationships going on here; and there’s not really any one size fits all approach to video.
  • So you could walk into a florist, or fancy agency, and spend a lot of money on an expensive floral arrangement. And yes, it will sit on your desk looking beautiful, and you’ll get lots of praise from your colleagues and probably even your boss.
  • But in about two weeks, those flowers will die. And all of that money will have been wasted.
  • I suggest you choose to go with succulents instead.
  • ×