Carri Bugbee on Social TV

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Social TV is the intersection of social media with TV (and film) content, recommendations, ratings and delivery. This presentation is an overview of how Social TV came about and what's coming, with take-aways for marketers.

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Carri Bugbee on Social TV

  1. Social  TV    Ecosystem  &  Opportuni1es   by  Carri  Bugbee   February  11,  2013  
  2. About  Carri  Bugbee  •  Social  TV  explorer,  social  media  marke1ng   strategist  and  speaker;  adver1sing/PR  professional  •  Social  TV  columnist/analyst  and  editorial  board   member  of  TheSocialMediaMonthly.com  •  Founder  of  Big  Deal  PR  (BigDealPR.com)  •  Contribu1ng  author:  “The  Big  Book  of  Social  Media   Case  Studies,  Stories,  Perspec=ves”  •  Social  media  speaker/trainer  and  former  adjunct   professor  of  Social  Media  Marke1ng  at  Portland   State  University  •  On  TwiUer  at  @CarriBugbee  and  @socialTVtrends  •  Social  TV  links:  bit.ly/socialtvfilm  •  Social  media  links  for  marketers:  bit.ly/smmtrain  •  Bio  and  other  social  profiles  (G+):  CarriBugbee.com  
  3. TV  has  always  been  social  
  4. Actually,  most  entertainment     media  has  been  social  
  5. Scarcity  guaranteed  common  experiences  In  1945,  programming  was  limited  to  three  days  per  week.    
  6. Enter  social  media  (Web  2.0)  
  7. Social  media  +  TV  was  inevitable  Carri’s  defini,on:    Technologies  (soZware  and  hardware)  and  processes  that  allow  connec1ons  and  interac1ons  between  fans,  content  creators  and  distributors  of  video  content.    Wikipedia’s  defini,on:  Social  television  is  a  general  term  for  technology  that  supports  communica1on  and  social  interac1on  in  either  the  context  of  watching  television,  or  related  to  TV  content.  It  also  includes  the  study  of  television-­‐related  social  behavior,  devices  and  networks  
  8. Financial  upside  of  social  media  +  TV  is  huge   Media  industry  analyst,   Jack  Myers,  predicts  social   TV  could  be  a  $12  billion   market  by  2020.   MIT  Technology  Review   listed  social  TV  as  one  of   the  10  most  important   emerging  technologies     in  2010.   Wired  Magazine  named   Social  TV  one  of  six   “trends  to  expect”  in  2011   Source:  hUp://blog.flurry.com/bid/82171/Upper-­‐Middle-­‐Class-­‐Females-­‐Key-­‐to-­‐Bridging-­‐Mobile-­‐Ad-­‐Spending-­‐Gap  
  9. Fans  got  the  ball  rolling  organically  by   adapNng  exisNng  tools  and  plaOorms  TwiPer  hashtags  became  the  first  social  TV  “tools”  
  10. TwiPer  pushes  official  integraNon  with   entertainment  brands  TwiUer  partnered  with  NASCAR  &  TNT  to  launch  the  first  brand  hashtag  page  June  ’12.  It  features  pics,  videos  and  a  blend  of  tweets  curated  by  algorithm  &  humans  (mostly  focused  on  racers).  hUp://blog.twiUer.com/2012/06/off-­‐to-­‐ races-­‐with-­‐nascar.html  
  11. Online  buzz  becomes  crucial     to  live  events  
  12. Facebook  has  been  slow  to  “friend”  TV  biz   (but  not  for  lack  of  trying)   Early  efforts  have  had   mixed  or  mediocre   results.  Look  for  new   features  to  roll  out  in   2013.  •  Facebook  is  experimen1ng  with  ways   to  share  updates  more  visually.  •   “Watching”  update  could  replace     check-­‐in    apps  for  TV  shows.   hUp://thenextweb.com/facebook/2013/02/09/ facebook-­‐social-­‐tv-­‐checkin-­‐feature/  
  13. Social  media  doesn’t  detract  from   TV  viewership,  it  o[en  boosts  it   Source:  hUp://www.imoderate.com/wp-­‐content/uploads/SocialTV-­‐Final.pdf  
  14. Contests,  sports  and  comedy  dominate   social  media  conversaNons   Source:  jomc279.files.wordpress.com/2011/08/buzztv-­‐gets-­‐social.pdf  
  15. TV  viewers  love  to  mulN-­‐task    Source:  hUp://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/online_mobile/double-­‐vision-­‐global-­‐trends-­‐in-­‐tablet-­‐and-­‐smartphone-­‐use-­‐while-­‐watching-­‐tv    
  16. Cha]ng  with  friends  and  researching   TV  content  provides  potent  incenNves  Source:  hUp://blog.nielsen.com/nielsenwire/online_mobile/40-­‐of-­‐tablet-­‐and-­‐smartphone-­‐owners-­‐use-­‐them-­‐while-­‐watching-­‐tv    
  17. Tablets  skew  older,  smart  phones  skew  younger   (both  are  important  as  second  screens)   Blue  =  Nme  spent   with  tablets  +  TV    Green  =  Nme  spent   with  phones  +  TV     Source:  hUp://www.knowledgenetworks.com/news/releases/2012/041212_mmm-­‐tv-­‐tablet.html  
  18. Sports  and  other  live  events  are  crucial     to  #2ndScreen  acNvity  CBS  and  Turner  Sports  streamed  NCAA  March  Madness  live  via  an  iOS  app  for  the  first  1me  in  2011.  Expect  this  to  become  common.  
  19. Social  media  allows  TV  stories  to  live  in   other  places  (transmedia)  
  20. How  I  got  interested  in  Social  TV:     TweeNng  for  @PeggyOlson  Started Peggy onTwitter in August2008.Entire universe ofMad Mencharacters joined.Fun experimentquickly yieldedvaluable insights.
  21. Many  thought  it  was  a  “real”  campaign   “…now it looks like the shows marketing team has stepped up the game again by really jumping into the social media space.”
  22. Mad  Men  fans  loved  it   “…their smart and clever use of Twitter is something brands or other television shows should take note of.”
  23. AMC?  Not  so  much.  Twitter suspendedMad Men accountsto comply withAMC’s request (thenetwork reportedlysent DMCA take-down notice).
  24. AMC  quickly  pivoted  to  support  fans   “AMC has issued a statement in support of Twitter-based ‘Mad Men’ characters after online fans were angered that the popular social-networking site yanked the feeds.”
  25. Mad  Men  tweeters  conNnue  (even  now)  
  26. Fans  love   becoming  characters…  
  27. …and   sharing  adventures   with  characters.  
  28. Fans  also  want  to  engage  with  actual   celebriNes  and  shows  
  29. Connected  or  “smart”  TVs  will   usher  in  big  changes  (at  criNcal  mass)  38%  of  US  households  have  at  least  one  TV  connected  to  the  internet  via  video-­‐game  system,    Blu-­‐ray,  Apple  TV,  Roku,  or  the  TV  set  itself  Adop1on  is  up  from  30%  in  2011  and  24%  in  2010.  
  30. This  is  great  news  for  adverNsers  hUp://www.marke1ngcharts.com/wp/television/7-­‐in-­‐10-­‐connected-­‐tv-­‐viewers-­‐act-­‐on-­‐interact-­‐with-­‐ads-­‐23041/  
  31. Many  are  banking  on  second  screen  apps   to  drive  engagement  and  revenue   SyFy  shows  “Being  Human”  and  “Alphas”   use  Shazam  to  let  viewers  “unlock”   special  content  and  enter  sweepstakes.    
  32. Check-­‐in  apps  most  popular  (so  far)  GetGlue.com  uses  game  mechanics,  friend  lists,  TwiUer-­‐like  commen1ng,  integra1on  with  social  networks,  reviews  &  recommenda1ons  to  keep  fans  coming  back.  GoMiso.com  and  Tunerfish.com  offer  similar  func1ons.  
  33. Marketers  experimenNng  with  T-­‐commerce   (could  be  Holy  Grail  for  TV  adver,sers)   AcNv8.me  is  an  early  enabler  of  T-­‐commerce  via  mobile  devices.  
  34. AutomaNc  content  recogniNon  (ACR)  technologies  key  to  many  new  opportuniNes  Shazam  drives  commerce  by  recognizing  on-­‐screen  content  (ads  or  entertainment)  and  driving  veiwers  to  second  screen  experiences  and  opportuniNes.  
  35. Viggle  rewards  viewers  for  watching  TV   (relies  on  content  recogniNon/syncing)  
  36. Contests,  polls  and  voNng  are  popular   engagement  mechanisms    Loyalize  offers:  •  polls    •  social  check-­‐ins  •  mood-­‐o-­‐meter  •  TwiUer  feeds    •  Votes  in  real  1me  on  TV  •  For  use  in  live  broadcasts  “You  can  ignore  that  people  will  do  something  else  during  down1me  moments  of  a  live  event,  or  create  an  experience  for  second  screen  devices.  Crea1ng  a  synchronous  experience  is  the  future  of  live  TV.”    –  Todd  Greene,  CEO  
  37. Social  data  +  TV  engagement  is  creaNng  a     new  raNngs  game  (and  acquisiNons*)   Trendrr.TV  tracks  all   major  networks  &   shows  in  real-­‐1me.   Ac1vity  is  determined   by  TwiUer,  Facebook,  &   mul1ple  second  screen   services.   Note:  Nielsen  acquired   social  TV  analy=cs  firm   SocialGuide  Nov.  ’12;   TwiTer  acquired  BlueFin   Labs  Feb.  ‘13.  
  38. BlueFin  Labs  tracks  TV  content  and  ads  through  online  conversaNons  BlueFin  says  it  can  help  brands  “gain  insight  into  how  a  TV  campaign  moves  consumer  conversa1on  in  social  media.”    It  will  analyze  “brand  and  lifestyle  affini1es  of  TV  audiences  so  brands  can  beUer  target  their  TV  campaign  toward  consumers  who  are  most  likely  to  respond  and  engage.”    
  39. Social  TV  ecosystem    is   exploding  
  40. Types  of  Social  TV  Apps   (most  apps  fall  into  several  categories)  •  Check-­‐in  (similar  to  geo-­‐local  check-­‐ins,  but  for  TV  shows)  •  Supplementary  content  (related  to  programs  or  ads)  •  Social  networking  and  chat  (with  like-­‐minded  fans)  •  Social  gaming  •  Content  recogni1on  (mobile  device  syncing  with  content  on  TV)  •  Analy1cs  (TV  and  movie  ra1ngs)  •  Rewards,  coupons,  incen1ves,  loyalty  programs  •  Remote  control  (via  mobile  device  apps)  •  Guides  to  programming  (with  social  recommenda1ons  built  in)  •  Vo1ng,  polls,  ra1ngs,  reviews  
  41. Take-­‐aways  for  brands  and  marketers  •  Get  comfortable  with  social  data  and  meta  data—we’re  all  data   marketers  now.  •  Watch  for  the  natural  evolu1on  from  organic  to  paid  on  various   plauorms  (already  happening  on  Facebook).  •  TV  everywhere  opens  up  lots  of  new  places  for  promo1ons.  •  Local  roll-­‐out  of  Social  TV  features/func1ons  will  create  affordable   opportuni1es  for  smaller  businesses  and  brands.  •  Social  TV  creates  new  places  to  find  and  engage  with  influencers.  •  TV  check-­‐in  services  can  offer  branded  opportuni1es,  promos,   coupons,  fan  base/community  building  and  more.  •  Find  and  tap  into  natural  affini1es  (i.e.,  communi1es  for  X  show   may  be  natural  consumers  of  Y  product).    
  42. Take-­‐aways  for  brands  and  marketers  •  Explore  current  interac1ve  TV  ads  to  home  in  on  target  markets   (example:  Hulu  ads  ask  “was  this  relevant  to  you?”  What  can  you   learn  from  this?)  •  Bridge  ad  content  from  TV  to  online—give  people  a  reason  to   engage  on  second  screen.  •  Look  for  narrow-­‐cas1ng  adver1sing  opportuni1es  with  online  TV.  •  Seek  out  sponsorship  and  product  placement  opportuni1es  in   transmedia  content.  •  Choose  adver1sing  on  shows  that  do  well  in  social  (all  things  being   equal)  to  get  more  mileage  from  ad  dollars.  •  Get  hip  to  social  ra1ngs  of  both  shows  and  commercials—and  start   tracking  the  online  buzz  your  spots  generate  (or  not).  •  Now  is  the  =me  to  experiment.  Rules  haven’t  yet  been  wriTen!    

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