Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Gardening in Small Spaces - NOFA Summer Conference 2015

663 views

Published on

4 case studies of urban gardens designed and installed by A Yard & A Half Landscaping Cooperative bring permaculture lessons to bear on planning and designing small spaces. Includes sustainable technologies, edible plant lists, and resources for site assessment and planning.

Published in: Environment
  • Be the first to comment

Gardening in Small Spaces - NOFA Summer Conference 2015

  1. 1. Gardening in Small Spaces Carolyn Edsell-Vetter, MCH, NOFA-AOLCP
  2. 2. Who’s Here?
  3. 3. Where is your “Small Space”?Remember: There are no design problems, only opportunities! • Urban yard • Patio or courtyard • Deck or balcony • Roof of house, shed, doghouse… • Fire escape • Window box • Entryway • Tree wells & crevices • Indoors
  4. 4. Permaculture PrinciplesRemember: There are no design problems, only opportunities! 1. Observe & Interact 2. Catch & Store Energy 3. Obtain a Yield 4. Apply Self-Regulation & Accept Feedback 5. Use & Value Renewable Resources and Services 6. Produce No Waste 7. Design from Patterns to Details 8. Integrate Rather Than Segregate 9. Use Small & Slow Solutions 10. Use & Value Diversity 11. Use Edges & the Marginal 12. Creatively Use & Respond to Change
  5. 5. Permaculture PrinciplesRemember: There are no design problems, only opportunities! 1. Observe & Interact 2. Catch & Store Energy 3. Obtain a Yield 4. Apply Self-Regulation & Accept Feedback 5. Use & Value Renewable Resources and Services 6. Produce No Waste 7. Design from Patterns to Details 8. Integrate Rather Than Segregate 9. Use Small & Slow Solutions 10. Use & Value Diversity 11. Use Edges & the Marginal 12. Creatively Use & Respond to Change
  6. 6. Why do I need to have a plan? A plan allows you to: • Make the most of opportunities created by natural and man-made aspects of a site • Identify and solve problems • Work with, preserve, and improve natural and human systems (hydrology, soils, air, ecosystems, plant & animal life, natural resources, human – individual & communal – health & well-being) • Avoid frustration down the road (sun-loving plants in a shady area, a flooded basement from bad grading & impervious surfaces…) • Maximize beauty & aesthetics of the space • Communicate with those helping you to install and/or manage the landscape
  7. 7. The Planning Process 1. Base map 2. Site assessment & analysis 3. Schematic/Use map 4. Plan development 5. Final plan & cost estimates 6. Implementation 7. Evaluation & adjustment
  8. 8. Making a Base Map • Plot plan • Municipal assessor’s database • GIS mapping • Survey • Detailed field measurements
  9. 9. 1. Hillside Driveway All photos by Jesse or Carolyn Edsell-Vetter; landscape design by Carolyn Edsell-Vetter & installation by A Yard & A Half Landscaping Co-Op, unless otherwise noted.
  10. 10. Understanding Contours 130’ 140’ 150’
  11. 11. Calculating Grade Change You will need: • Stake or buddy • Tape measure • String • Line level
  12. 12. Boundaries • Structures • Walls & fences • Curbs, sidewalks, roads • When in doubt, get a survey!
  13. 13. Orientation Image courtesy of University of Oregon
  14. 14. Types of Shade Part-shade Dappled shade High shade Deep shade
  15. 15. Drainage  Where does the water come from?  Where does it end up?  Downspouts, gutters, overhangs, topography, yards of neighbors  Erosion, pooling, wet & dry areas  Problems can be more intense in smaller yards!
  16. 16. 100% Infiltration On-Site
  17. 17. 2. The “Tree House”
  18. 18. From Base Map to Concept: Vision & Values How do you want to use the space? What do you envision this space becoming? What values do you want to guide your plan?
  19. 19. What are your values? 1. Friends & family: entertaining, play space 2. Self: orderly space for hobbies & soul-fulfilling activities 3. Spirit: beauty, relaxing view, plantings & reclaimed materials demonstrate oneness with the earth 4. Body/health: lead-free raised bed to grow veggies, groundcovers to reduce risk 5. Community: friendly fences; wildlife value; local, low-impact materials; installers with good ethics around employment & sustainability 1 2 3 4 5
  20. 20. Do you need/want… • Lawn • Parking • Play structures • Open play areas • Paved areas • Privacy or screening • Protection from sun/wind • Edible plants • Groundcover • Habitat for pollinators? Birds? Bats? Frogs? • Storage for bikes, toys, strollers, furniture, tools… • Utility area for fixing things, washing the dog, hobbies… • Space for garbage, recycling • Compost pile/enclosure • Dining or sitting areas • Cooking area • Fire • Water
  21. 21. Site Analysis & Use Plan • Zones of use: What will you do where? • Circulation: Where do you need to go? How will you get there?
  22. 22. Clear Definition
  23. 23. Subdivided Spaces • Makes each space seem larger • Defines different spaces for different uses • Helps keep spaces orderly • Changes in elevation • Screening & suspense
  24. 24. Squeezing in Functionality •Kinetic, creative play •Water sounds •Sculptural element •Water for birds & pollinators
  25. 25. Plants Everywhere! Planting hardscapes: •Manages water •Softens edges •Adds fragrance & color Design:ChristieDustman&Co.
  26. 26. 3. Sacred Space, Shared Space
  27. 27. Circulation
  28. 28. Views Design:BarbaraPopolow
  29. 29. Multi-purpose Plants • Food/medicine • Architectural use (shade, windbreak, focal point) • Nectar source • Nitrogen fixer • Companion plant • Critter cover or feed • Beauty Photo:JocelynHayes-Chilvers Photo:wildflowerrevolution.com
  30. 30. 4. Urban Container Garden Look, urban soil! I think that’s dog poo.
  31. 31. Raised Bed Benefits Design&installationbytheEdsell-Vetterfamily. •Soil safety •Ergonomics •If you have a paved lot… •Warms up earlier in spring •Lifts plants up to the sun
  32. 32. One piece, many uses Raised Planter & Trellis •Screening from busy street •Shade for dining room window •Support for vines •Lead-free planting area for food •Seating •Pollinator value…
  33. 33. …and secret hideout!
  34. 34. Raised Bed ROI Size: 66 sf of planting area, 2’-3’ deep Time: 2 weekends for family of 4, May 2015 ROI (so far): 15 trays of sundried tomatoes & zucchini, a summer of salads, herbs, 2 pints raspberries, 4 pints pickles, 2 batches of pesto, some kick-butt mojitos… Intangibles: bees, butterflies, lowered blood pressure, kids eating their veggies
  35. 35. Closing the Circle More ideas for sustainable, small-scale gardening
  36. 36. Hanging Baskets Hydroponic Window Farm Upside-down Tomato Bucket •Tomatoes •Strawberries •Bush beans •Cucumbers •Herbs •Nasturtiums & edible flowers
  37. 37. Pocket Gardening
  38. 38. Rain Gardens Raingarden irrigating fruit trees in suburban Chicago front yard Urban entryway rain garden with aqueduct
  39. 39. Rain-Water Recovery 55-gallon rain barrel Urn-fountain installed over 1,000 gallon storage system
  40. 40. Water Gardens
  41. 41. Bioshelters •Passive solar + thermal mass from stored water & masonry •Warmer winter temps allow for year-round growing & aquaculture •When connected to a dwelling, provides supplemental heat & humidity
  42. 42. Tiny Composting  Sealed outdoor composter  Bokashi (fermentation) bin  Worm bin  Check to see if public or private compost pick-up is available
  43. 43. Container Gardening: The Nitty-Gritty  Planting mix w/ low N-P-K  Use reputable organic potting soil (e.g. VT Compost or Ideal) or make your own  Coir, newsprint as alternatives to peat  Weight of planting medium  Fertilize w/ 4-4-2 or lower organic fertilizer (e.g. fish, cottonseed meal, compost tea)
  44. 44. Self-Watering Containers  Drainage  Water reservoir  Soil foot or wick  Tube for adding water  Sand if growing root veg
  45. 45. Plants for Containers  Cold-hardy perennials & woody plants (z3-4)  Dwarf varieties  Annual vegetables  Group plants w/ similar needs
  46. 46. Hanging Planters  Strawberry ‘Patio Temptation’  Tomatoes ‘Tumbling Tom’, ‘Robin’s Egg’, ‘Tiny Tom’  Bush beans  Cucumber ‘Cool Breeze’  Herbs
  47. 47. Window Boxes  Tomatoes from previous  Scallions  Radishes  Mesclun mix  Carrot ‘Suko’ or ‘Parmex’  Herbs  Strawberries
  48. 48. Coldframes  Lettuce, mesclun  Spinach  Scallions  Radishes  Chard (prefers to be in the ground)  Mini carrots ‘Kinko’, ‘Nelson’, ‘Purple Haze’  Endive
  49. 49. Large Containers  > 20”x26”  Corn ‘Luther Hill’  Squash, melon  Kale, kohlrabi  Potatoes & leeks – start w/ container ½ full, then hill up as they grow
  50. 50. Fruit for Small Spaces  Apples, Pears, Peaches, Plums grown on dwarf rootstock, e.g. ‘Urban Apple’ series  Dwarf citrus (move indoors; humidify)  Blueberries, Thornless Blackberries, ‘Brazelberries’ serries  Currants where available
  51. 51. Grow On! Carolyn Edsell-Vetter, MCH, AOLCP Blog/handouts: http://ayardandahalf.wordpress.com Email: carolyn [at] ayardandahalf [dot] com W: 781-788-8855

×