Digital Audiences by Caroline Greener

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Arts Council England’s Digital Research Project. Caroline Greener, Marketing Manager at Audiences North East presents this new piece of research. The research involves UK wide e-survey with 2,000 digitally engaged people about their on and offline cultural consumption.

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Digital Audiences by Caroline Greener

  1. 1. Digital Audiences<br />Arts and Cultural<br />Engagement<br />Online<br />Caroline Greener<br />Marketing Manager<br />Audiences North East <br />
  2. 2. The digital space<br />2<br />
  3. 3. 73%<br />There were 19.2 million households with an Internet connection in 2010, representing 73 per cent of households. The region with the highest level of access was London, with 83 per cent, the lowest was the North East, with 59 per cent.Source: ONS Opinions Survey<br />
  4. 4. Online is the media space where people spend the most time <br />“When I haven’t got the internet I just feel completely lost…it’s scary how much you rely on it”<br />Leading Edge : 18-24<br />LEISURE TIME (HOURS/WEEK)<br />
  5. 5. 5<br />Have set up a profile<br />Use daily<br />Over 3/5 UK online adults use social networking<br />
  6. 6. 6<br />
  7. 7. <ul><li>Email marketing ‘more effective than social’</li></ul>Tweetlouder - automagical<br />Digital coupons<br />Facebook, the leader<br /> Smartphones hit 25% penetration<br />5 today trends<br />7<br />
  8. 8. Digital audiences research 2010<br /><ul><li>Why?
  9. 9. How arts and cultural organisations can use technology to deepen existing relationships with audiences
  10. 10. Can we segment the online audience?
  11. 11. Implications for differing audience needs
  12. 12. How?
  13. 13. 2,000 quantitative surveys
  14. 14. Focus groups
  15. 15. Qualitative interviews
  16. 16. Who?
  17. 17. Arts Council England
  18. 18. Arts & Business
  19. 19. MLA
  20. 20. MTM London</li></ul>8<br />
  21. 21. Overview of findings<br /><ul><li>53% of online users are engaging with arts and culture online
  22. 22. There are 5 types of online interaction requiring different levels of engagement
  23. 23. People see the in real life (IRL) experience as superior to online
  24. 24. Music is the leading arts genre online
  25. 25. Social media has become a major tool for discovery
  26. 26. Brand is key, particularly with email
  27. 27. Online engagers are offline engagers
  28. 28. It is possible to segment online users by attitude and behaviour and target online activities to them</li></ul>9<br />
  29. 29. 53% of online users are engaging with arts and culture online<br />10<br />
  30. 30. 5 ways of interacting online<br />Access<br />Learn<br />Experience<br />Share<br />Create <br />11<br />
  31. 31. 12<br />
  32. 32. 13<br />
  33. 33. “A tremendous survey – exceptional” The Observer“Fascinating” Sunday Express“You must visit this fab show” The Independent <br />14<br />
  34. 34. People see the in real life (IRL) experience as superior to online<br />Jessie at the Brooklyn Museum<br />15<br />
  35. 35. 16<br />
  36. 36. 17<br />
  37. 37. Music is the leading arts genre online <br />18<br />
  38. 38. 19<br />
  39. 39. 20<br />
  40. 40. Social media has become a major tool for discovery<br />21<br />
  41. 41. 22<br />
  42. 42. Brand is key, particularly with email<br />23<br />
  43. 43. Online engagers are offline engagers<br />24<br />
  44. 44. Online segmentation<br />It is possible to segment online users by attitude and behaviour and target activity towards them. Three segments are of interest to the cultural sector:<br />Confident core (29%)<br />Late adopters (21%)<br />Leading edge (11%)<br />25<br />
  45. 45. Encouraging online engagement among Confident Core<br /><ul><li>Key user needs
  46. 46. Discovery
  47. 47. Filtering
  48. 48. Learning
  49. 49. Some experiencing
  50. 50. Some sharing
  51. 51. Must do</li></ul>Online ticketing<br /><ul><li>Key strategies
  52. 52. SEO
  53. 53. Be in the audience’s chosen online spaces
  54. 54. Consider going mobile
  55. 55. Whet appetites
  56. 56. Be informative and credible
  57. 57. Encourage sociable experiences</li></ul>26<br />
  58. 58. Encouraging online engagement among Late Adopters<br /><ul><li>Key differences to Confident Core
  59. 59. Nervous
  60. 60. Distrust of online-only brands
  61. 61. Private
  62. 62. OPPORTUNITIES
  63. 63. Online learning
  64. 64. Email dialogue
  65. 65. Key things to bear in mind
  66. 66. No unsolicited email contact
  67. 67. Very little social networking
  68. 68. No user generated content
  69. 69. Reassurances needed re online security
  70. 70. Low skills and low confidence</li></ul>27<br />
  71. 71. Encouraging online engagement among the Leading Edge<br /><ul><li>Key differences to Confident Core
  72. 72. Mobile internet
  73. 73. Immersive experiences
  74. 74. Advocacy and social media
  75. 75. Interested in creativity
  76. 76. Expectation of free content
  77. 77. Tech literate – easily disappointed
  78. 78. Passionate advocates
  79. 79. Vocal detractors
  80. 80. OPPORTUNITIES
  81. 81. Providing unique, money can’t buy experiences
  82. 82. Being ‘first’
  83. 83. Partnerships with mobile content providers
  84. 84. Apps</li></ul>28<br />
  85. 85. Strategic implications for the cultural sector<br /><ul><li>Opportunities
  86. 86. Marketing
  87. 87. Audience Development
  88. 88. Selling tickets
  89. 89. Delivering content
  90. 90. Participative engagement
  91. 91. Challenges
  92. 92. Direct revenue vs costs
  93. 93. Ambition vs pragmatism</li></ul>29<br />

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