Personal Savvy                                        HandshakingHandshaking is probably the most common gesture Americans...
Networking Etiquette12 Tips on how to "Work a room". 1. Look the part - make sure your dress is appropriate for the functi...
Business Card Protocol      Here are 10 tips on business card savvy 1. Always carry your cards in a professional looking b...
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Sales protocal and etiquette

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Sales protocal and etiquette

  1. 1. Personal Savvy HandshakingHandshaking is probably the most common gesture Americans use on a dailybasis. It is also recognized and accepted around the world as a form of greeting.Your handshake speaks very loudly about you. It is your signature! It is partof your professionalism to know how to correctly shake someones hand.Here are 10 rules to help you insure a confident handshake:1. Always stand up - whether you are a man or a woman, you should rise.2. Face the person squarely, not at an angle.3. The handshake should be a "web to web"; contact between your thumb and index finger. By shaking hands web to web, this avoids the dead fish or fingertip only handshake.4. Thumbs should be straight up. Avoid rolling one hand over or under for this may often denote a power struggle.5. Make direct eye contact and hold the gaze through the introduction.6. Smile, using a pleasant and approachable smile, not an overly big grin.7. Carry papers, books, drinks, etc. in the left hand leaving the right hand free for shaking hands.8. Do not squeeze someones hand too hard (bone crushing) or too soft (dead fish); these are both signs of insecurity.9. Avoid pumping the hand up and down excessively. 10. The person who is being introduced "to" should extend his hand first. *The procedure for shaking hands as stated above, follows business etiquette formalities rather than social etiquette rules. This procedure is felt to be more beneficial for the life skills needed.The Charleston School of Protocol and Etiquette, Inc.Copyright © 2002 by the Charleston School of Protocol and Etiquette, Inc.www.CharlestonSchoolotProtocol.com or telephone (843) 207-1025
  2. 2. Networking Etiquette12 Tips on how to "Work a room". 1. Look the part - make sure your dress is appropriate for the function you are attending; look polished, well groomed and well put together. 2. Make a powerful entrance - most eyes are focused on the entrance.Walk with poise and purpose. 3. Smile and be approachable. 4. Walk into the room and view the area - note people you want to meet,people by whom you want to be seen and where the food tables and bars areLocated. 5. Eat a small amount of food before you go, to avoid rushing to the foodand beverage areas - never have more than one or two drinks. 6. Carry all items in your left hand, leaving your right hand free to meetpeople. 7. Wear your name tag on the right shoulder, as it is in the line of site ofShaking someones hand. View other peoples name tags - and speak theirname in conversation. 8. Seek out people in groups of 3 or more or someone standing alone.Avoid interrupting groups of two in deep conversation. 9. Do not spend more than 10 minutes with any one person or group. 10. Depart the group gracefully by excusing yourself immediately afteryou have spoken rather than after another person has finished. 11. Learn the art of small talk and discuss non-controversial topics of theday or a common interest. 12. Listen and do not monopolize the conversation.There is also a follow up to this type of networking. Keeping in touch isEssential. Deliver what you have promised, make a phone call, write a noteor send an email message to keep your name in front of them.First ImpressionsCopyright © 2002 by the Charleston School of Protocol and Etiquette, Inc.www. CharlestonSchoolofProtocol.com
  3. 3. Business Card Protocol Here are 10 tips on business card savvy 1. Always carry your cards in a professional looking business card case.This keeps the cards from getting bent up and soiled. 2. Present the card with your right hand with the lettering face up to theReceiving party. 3. Never write on someone elses card in their presence. You can write onit as soon as you are by yourself to make note of important items to be usedat a later date. 4. When presented with a card, look at it briefly before putting it away, andPossibly comment about something on the card. This lets them know you arePaying attention and are interested in them. 5. When accepting a business card, place it in your breast pocket, wallet oreven in your own card case, showing that you value it. 6. Cards are given at the beginning of the meeting. When this happens, youcan place each card on the table in front of you. As with several, place themin order of your guests to help you remember names (Japanese do this). 7. Usually the higher ranking person starts the process. The person of highPosition should ask for your card first. 8. In a social situation or a party, cards should be exchanged in private. 9. Whether at a formal dinner or McDonalds, business cards should never beBrought out during the meal.10. Cards should be exchanged between two individuals at a time, notScattered about in a large group. People may assume you are trying to sellThem something and it may devalue your card.First ImpressionsCopyright ® 2002 by the Charleston School of Protocol and Etiquette, Inc.www. CharlestonSchoololProtocol.com

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