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Behavior across the Lifespan<br />Carla J. McCoy<br />Unit 5 Discussion Board – Aspects of Psychology<br />American InterC...
Behavior Across The Lifespan   Unit 5 Db
Behavior Across The Lifespan   Unit 5 Db
Behavior Across The Lifespan   Unit 5 Db
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Behavior Across The Lifespan Unit 5 Db

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Before I begin writing this article I’d just like to say how hard it is to exactly pinpoint one particular personality theory that offers the best explanation of how an individual’s personality develops because there are so many different personality styles such as Dependent Personality, Avoidant Personality, Borderline Personality, Paranoid Personality, Schizotypal Personality, Schizoid Personality, and Histronic Personality. (Sherry, A., Lyddon, W., & Henson, R., 2007) Most theories fall into one of six theoretical approaches which include Psychodynamic, Cognitive/Social Learning, Humanistic/Existential, Behavioral Genetics, The Radical Behaviorist Approach, and Trait Theory. (Schultz & Schultz, 2001). I find it very difficult to only give one specific explanation of how an individual’s personality develops when there are so many theories, and characteristics of personality.

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Behavior Across The Lifespan Unit 5 Db

  1. 1. Behavior across the Lifespan<br />Carla J. McCoy<br />Unit 5 Discussion Board – Aspects of Psychology<br />American InterContinental University<br />February 6th, 2009<br />#1 Personality Theory – Before I begin writing this article I’d just like to say how hard it is to exactly pinpoint one particular personality theory that offers the best explanation of how an individual’s personality develops because there are so many different personality styles such as Dependent Personality, Avoidant Personality, Borderline Personality, Paranoid Personality, Schizotypal Personality, Schizoid Personality, and Histronic Personality. (Sherry, A., Lyddon, W., & Henson, R., 2007) Most theories fall into one of six theoretical approaches which include Psychodynamic, Cognitive/Social Learning, Humanistic/Existential, Behavioral Genetics, The Radical Behaviorist Approach, and Trait Theory. (Schultz & Schultz, 2001). I find it very difficult to only give one specific explanation of how an individual’s personality develops when there are so many theories, and characteristics of personality. <br />Personality involves characteristic patterns of various things such as feelings, thoughts, behaviors which include both rational and irrational, mood, opinions, motivations, speaking, acting, qualities, distinction, charisma, perception, desires, values, expectations, beliefs, problem solving, appearance, genetic stability, intellect, ego, manners, habits, tastes and morality all make up an individual personality. I would have to say that it involves all of these things in order to make up an individual personality and I’m sure there are more that I haven’t even listed. If you take 4 people and stand them in a line in a room when they are the age of 20, each individual will have a different personality, different experiences, different feelings, different thoughts, different behaviors etc.. No two people are alike so it is hard to say what exactly makes up each individuals own personality when everyone is so different, which is one thing I really love about humans. It wouldn’t be very much fun or very interesting if everyone had the same personality. (McCoy, C., 2009)<br />Being as I have to choose one particular personality theory, I’m going to have to choose David Kiersey’s Temperament theory. David Kiersey based his research on Jung’s theory as well as the data that was collected by Briggs and Myers. This theory uses all 16 types but demonstrates how they all fit nicely into four temperaments. It’s true that Personality development begins at a young age and one way the theory I chose best explains the development of personality as a child grows and matures is to take a look at how Temperament has become such a big particular help to teachers in school. This theory is used as a model for human behavior throughout the world, not only in school, but in social work, industry, counseling, and the Church. A good example in trying to define this theory is to take a look at what Professor Keith Golay, a trainer of school psychologists, school counselor, and child therapist had to say. He stated “Temperament is primary, and predisposes the person to certain ways of thinking, wanting, emoting and acting. Thus, each of the personality styles has its own way of learing, its own way of being motivated, its own way of relating with others, and its own way of being satisfied.” The Kierseian theory is many centuries in time from Hippocrates’ original ideas and goes back to the metaphorical use of four greek gods to represent the temperaments. The four gods used are Apollo which represents man’s sense of spirit, Prometheus represents man’s knowledge of science, Epimetheus represents man’s sense of duty, and Dionysus represents man’s sense of freedom and joy. (Hedges, P., 1997)<br />Here is an example of the various Temperament styles showing the grouping of the 16 types. <br />Intuitive – FeelingApolloIntuitive – ThinkingPrometheusSensing – JudgingEpimetheusSensing – PerceivingDionysusENFJ, ENFP, INFJ, INFPENTJ, ENTP, INTJ, INTPESTJ, ISTJ, ESFJ, ISFJESTP, ISTP, ESFP, ISFPImaginative, sympathetic, linguistic, enthusiastic, subjectiveAnalytical, curious, inventive, logical, objectiveDependable, factual, painstaking, routinised, thoroughArtistic, athletic, cheerful, mechanical, realistic<br />And here is an extract from the Basic Personality Characteristics Section from the Teacher’s Programme<br />Extravert AttitudeIntrovert AttitudeEnjoy working with people, and can be lonely without them. Like to spend quite a lot of leisure time with people too. Enjoy being with people some of the time, but important to have time for more quiet and solitary activities. Enjoy being in a group of people, and are generally talkative and friendly. Can feel drained by long periods alone. Prefer meeting people in small numbers, and are better at relating to people one at a time; too many people are exhausting and energy-drainingLike to hear everyone’s news, and interest goes wide and outwardTend to wait until receive other people’s news. More interested in inward reflection. Like to speak out when with others and express what they feel. Can be uneasy with silence. When with others need time to think before offering opinions. Can find being surrounded by Extraverts painful. <br />I have actually taken the test prior to taking this class and have it listed on my own website. I took this test, and then retook it a couple of years later and got the same results. I am INFJ which is listed in the chart. <br />#2 I chose Somatoform disorders which are according to the DMV, Physical symptoms such as paralysis cause significant distress or impairment but do not have medical explanation; examples include somatization disorder and hypochondriasis. (DSM-IV-TR, 2000) This particular disorder has behaviors associated with it that differ from similar behaviors considered normal in American culture because it not only affects daily activities but the patients themselves believe they are very sick which is very hard to test. The treatment for this type of disorder is very difficult to achieve and the patient often requires a lot of attention, however the best treatment that has been discovered is family relationship. Another form of treatment would be Cognitive Behavioral Psychotherapy which would reduce stress felt by the patient. However, patients with Somatization disorder normally refuse to undergo any psychotherapy due to the belief that the symptoms they have are in fact an illness. Behavior therapy would be a good treatment for this disorder as well. Physical symptoms of this disorder have been discovered such as nauseas, pain, dizziness, and depression. Somatoform disorder is also known as Briquette’s syndrome. One big factor with this disorder is that it’s due to stress, and anxiety which they express inwardly rather than outwardly. (Psyweb.com, 2009)<br />References<br />Sherry, A., Lyddon, W., Henson, R., (2007) Journal of Counseling & Development Retrieved: Feb. 2nd, 2009 at: http://wf2dnvr5.webfeat.org/vntTL1803/url=http://web.ebscohost.com/ehost/pdf?vid=2&hid=4&sid=ff2aa8d4-2a8f-4060-b3b6-7ad3920f932c%40sessionmgr103<br />McCoy, C., (2009) American InterContinental University Unit 5 Discussion Board, Behavior Across the Lifespan, Retrieved Feb. 3rd, 2009 at: https://mycampus.aiu-online.com <br />Hedges, P., (1997) Personality Patterns in Teachers and Their Pupils Journal for Pastoral Care and Personal and Social Education retrieved at http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Aegean/9890/page5.html<br />DSM-IV-TR, (2000) Descriptions and Examples of Major Categories of Disorders Listed in DSM-IV-TR, (4th ed.) American Psychiatric Association retrieved on February 6th, 2009, from AIU Online, Virtual Campus. PSY206 Aspects of Psychology PSY206 – 0805B – 04 at https://campus.aiu-online.com<br />PSYweb.com, (2009) Somatoform Disorders retrieved at: http://psyweb.com/Mdisord/jsp/somatd.jsp<br />Davis, S., & Palladino, J., Prentice Hall, Psychology (5th ed.) Pearson Education retrieved on February 6th, 2009, from AIU Online, e-book Virtual Campus. Retrieved at: https://campus.aiu-online.com<br />

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