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September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 1
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development F...
September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 2
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development F...
©2020 Alltech, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
With the most researched yeast on the market, the Alltech On-
Farm Support progra...
September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 4
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development F...
September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 5
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development F...
September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 6
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development F...
September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 7
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development F...
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KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development F...
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KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development F...
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KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development ...
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KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development ...
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KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development ...
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KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development ...
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KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development ...
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KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development ...
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KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development ...
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KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development ...
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KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development ...
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KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development ...
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KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development ...
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KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development ...
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KY Milk Matters September/October 2021

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KY Milk Matters September/October 2021

  1. 1. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 1 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Milk Matters S e p t e m b e r - O c t o b e r w w w. k y d a i r y. o r g K E N T U C K Y Supported by Keeping the Soil Covered and Producing High Quality Feed page 6 2021 State Fair Cheese Auction page 10 Schlappi Retires from Kentucky Department of Agriculture page 17 I t was great to have a complete Kentucky State Fair this year. Last year the Dairy Show was limited because of Covid to only the Junior Dairy Show. Also, there was no midway, food stands, concerts, side shows or exhibits in the South Wing. What a difference a year makes. Total dairy show cow numbers were down this year from pre- covid 2019, but the quality of the animals displayed could stand the competition of any year previous. Exhibitor’s attitudes were upbeat, and everyone seemed happy to have the opportunity to return to the tanbark and visit with old friends. Here are the results of the of the Junior and Open Supreme Champions. 2021 Kentucky State Fair Dairy Show is in The Books Junior Division Commissioner of Ag Trophy – Hudson Spoonamore - Stanford, KY Supreme Champion Heifer – Golden-Oaks US Title Red ET – Hallie Griffiths - Greensburg, KY Reserve Supreme Champion Heifer – Borderview Andreas Cami-ET – Elise Carpenter - Russell Springs, KY Supreme Champion Cow – KC Reviresco Babbles – Elise Carpenter - Russell Springs, KY Reserve Supreme Champion Cow – Mowry’s Burdette Scarlet – Tre Wright - Elizabethtown, KY Open Division Supreme Champion Dairy Cow – Hirds Colton Dream – Alta Mae Core - Salvisa, KY Reserve Supreme Champion Dairy Cow – Mowry’s Burdette Scarlet – Jeff Gibson - Eminence, KY Supreme Champion Dairy Heifer – Ms Stookeyholm Gemma-Red – Jeff Stookey - Milford, IN Reserve Supreme Champion Dairy Heifer – Miss Underground-Nash Melanie – Joseph Nash - Lyndonville, NY. (more photos on page 5) S Supreme Champion Dairy Heifer – Ms Stookeyholm Gemma-Red – Jeff Stookey - Milford, IN. Q Supreme Champion Dairy Cow – Hirds Colton Dream – Alta Mae Core - Salvisa, KY .
  2. 2. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 2 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund 2021 KDDC Board of Directors & Staff Executive Committee President: Freeman Brundige Vice President: Charles Townsend, DVM Sec./Treasurer: Tom Hastings EC Member: Greg Goode EC Past President: Richard Sparrow Board of Directors District 1: Freeman Brundige 731.446.6248 District 2: Josh Duvall 270.535.6533 District 3: Keith Long 270.670.1388 District 4: Bill Crist Jr. 270.590.3185 District 5: Tony Compton 270.378.0525 District 6: Mark Williams 270.427.0796 District 7: Greg Goode 606.303.2150 District 8: Steve Weaver 270.475.3154 District 9: Jerry Gentry 606.875.2526 District 10: Terry Rowlette 502.376.2292 District 11: Stewart Jones 270.402.4805 District 12: John Kuegel 270.316.0351 Equipment: Tony Cowherd 270.469.0398 Milk Haulers: Mike Owen 270.392.1902 Genetics: Dan Johnson 502.905.8221 Feed: Tom Hastings 270.748.9652 Nutrition: Elizabeth Lunsford Alltech 859.553.0072 Dairy Co-op: Stephen Broyles 859.421.9801 Veterinary: Dr. Charles Townsend 270.726.4041 Finance: Todd Lockett 270.590.9375 Heifer Raiser: Bill Mattingly 270.699.1701 Former Pres.: Richard Sparrow 502.370.6730 Employee & Consultants Executive Director: H.H. Barlow 859.516.1129 kddc@kydairy.org DC-Central: Beth Cox PO Box 144, Mannsville, KY 42758 bethcoxkddc@gmail.com 859.516.1619 • 270-469-4278 DC-Western: Dave Roberts 1334 Carrville Road, Hampton, KY 42047 roberts@kydairy.org 859.516.1409 DC-Northern: Jennifer Hickerson PO Box 293, Flemingsburg, KY 41041 j.hickersonkddc@gmail.com 859.516.2458 KDDC 176 Pasadena Drive • Lexington, KY 40503 www.kydairy.org KY Milk Matters produced by Carey Brown President’s Corner Freeman Brundige T ough times are not new to dairy farmers, we have all faced them at times. If you have been at it a long time, then you have probably dealt with several episodes. But the stretch we are in now seems to be far longer and more painful than previous encounters. There are a few government rule changes and directives out there to help, but the people in charge never seem to understand the true urgency of the situation. Meanwhile, more good dairy farms are having to make some very hard decisions about their future in this business. Very few dairy farmers got into the business because they expected to get rich, but they thought they would at least have a chance to be able to make a living and raise a family. We at KDDC are trying to do what we can to encourage a speedy implementation of all the programs available to help farmers financially. And we think our Dairy MILK 4.0 Program has potential to help increase income at the farm. On a brighter note, after participating in some local dairy shows and the fuller version of the Ky State Fair seeing the simple enjoyment of great people working with great cows is still encouraging to me. Kids and cows go better together, what a great way to teach children about so many of life lessons. And believe me those lessons will stick with you the rest of your life.
  3. 3. ©2020 Alltech, Inc. All Rights Reserved. With the most researched yeast on the market, the Alltech On- Farm Support program and our team of Elite Dairy Advisors are able to provide the best nutritional support and service to your herd. Our team serves as a new tool for nutritionists, producers and laborers to analyze your needs and develop a customized program for your operation. Our Alltech products and services work together to increase your herds efficiency and overall profitability. The support behind the product matters. For more information please contact Elizabeth Lunsford Territory Sales Manager elunsford@alltech.com 859.553.0072
  4. 4. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 4 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Executive Director Comments H H Barlow I ’m writing this on 9/11/21, exactly 20 years after that horrible, tragic day. My life as a dairy farmer was not changed that day, but our world was forever changed. Evil raised its ugly head that day, but it did not win, even though it caused so much horror, pain and loss. The only answer I know is God’s love and judgment which will reign victorious in the end. I’m confident that all who read this remember exactly where you were and what you were doing that day. Please pause, reflect and remember all the families who were so dramatically impacted that day and those who continue even today to be impacted. Pray for our country to turn back to our God-given roots of Christianity and love for one another and for the unity we had on 9/12/01. When I look at our dairy world today, I see times of uncertainty. Our business is in turmoil, like most everything else in the world. We really don’t have any answers or concrete knowledge of what the next year holds. Covid, feed prices, milk prices, governmental policies, labor and trucking issues…all are uncertain. Exports are currently the shining star of dairy. Last month, over 17% of all milk produced was shipped out of the country, making the availability of ships and containers vital to our milk price. Dixie Dairy Reports predicts that, for the next four months, prices will hold constant around $19.40 for 3.5 blend price. Feed costs at this writing are still very high. USDA Crop Report just raised yields and acres. In addition, there are reports of major grain terminal damage in various gulf ports from Hurricane Ida. I do believe there is potential for lower feed costs, barring any unforeseen problems. Another source of income has been announced by USDA. This is the latest in a number of government assistance programs initiated because of the pandemic. Unfortunately, this USDA program is very complicated and convoluted. All other assistance programs last year were run through your local FSA office. All dairy producers are very familiar with FSA offices, who have all our records, which made it easy to administer the past program payments. This new program is being shifted to all the milk handlers that buy our milk. The calculations for establishing the payments are very complicated and the handlers are allowed to keep an administrative fee for themselves. I am very disappointed in the way this program has been set up. Most of all, I’m disappointed dairy producers will not receive money now when they most need it. Unfortunately, the assistance will come much later, probably no earlier than December. The Dairy Margin Coverage Insurance Program for any dairy 200 cows or less has been a lifesaver in 2021. The payments all summer have been over $3/cwt monthly. A sign-up for 2022 will be coming this Fall. There are insurance programs for larger dairies but their premium structure is more costly than the DMC Program. Because of high feed cost, it appears the DMC payments will continue all year. In the final analysis, all any dairy producer wants is a fair price that covers his cost of production and some profit to remain sustainable. KDDC has two programs this Fall to be excited about…The World Dairy Expo trip September 28-October 1 and our Young Dairy Fellowship and Education series of meetings in November. Dan Johnson will be our facilitator with emphasis on improving reproduction. MILK 4.0 sign-ups are continuing. It has been a tough year financially for everyone, but if you haven’t already done so, please consider participating in these programs. The somatic cell improvement, pregnancy rate improvement and financial analysis programs are free with an opportunity to earn financial awards when you achieve certain goals. KDDC personnel will use your DHIA records and milk company quality reports to calculate the awards. One more time, on this day, Never Forget 9/11…Please pause and think of all the abundance, freedom and blessings we have in our country. These things did not come without great personal sacrifice, hard work and God’s blessing. Freedom isn’t free…we all must be vigilant and do what is necessary to keep it. As dairy farmers, let’s all raise a glass of milk to toast our freedom and blessings.
  5. 5. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 5 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund S Commissioner of Ag Trophy – Hudson Spoonamore - Stanford, KY S Supreme Champion Cow – KC Reviresco Babbles – Elise Carpenter - Russell Springs, KY S Reserve Supreme Champion Dairy Cow – Mowry’s Burdette Scarlet – Tre Wright - Elizabethtown, KY S Reserve Supreme Champion Dairy Cow – Mowry’s Burdette Scarlet – Jeff and Lisa Gibson - Eminence, KY
  6. 6. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 6 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Keeping the Soil Covered and Producing High Quality Feed… A WIN-WIN for Kentucky Producers Chris Teutsch Forage Specialist, University of Kentucky K eeping the soil covered with living green plant material reduces erosion, captures nutrients, improves soil structure, helps to suppress winter annual weeds, and if managed right, can provide high quality grazing or conserved forage. I have never understood why livestock producers allow corn silage fields to overwinter with no cover. To me this is a missed opportunity for winter grazing and producing high quality silage in the spring. With good management, winter annuals can be a reliable and high-quality part of forage systems in the mid-South. Cool-Season Grass Options Cool-season annual grasses that can be used for winter and early spring grazing and conserved forage include small grains and annual ryegrass. Crimson clover, an annual clover, can be grown in a mixture with both the small grains and annual ryegrass. Characteristics of commonly used cool-season annual grasses can be found in Table 1. Wheat (Triticum aestivum) is one of the most versatile small grains for a farming operation. Due to its excellent winter hardiness, wheat can be sown later in the fall than barley has good potential for pasture, silage or hay production. Wheat will withstand wetter soils than barley or oats, but tends to be less tolerant of poorly drained soils than rye and triticale. Managed properly, wheat can be grazed in the fall, again in early spring, and finally harvested for grain, hay or silage. Barley (Hordeum vulgare) is generally more susceptible to winterkill than wheat, especially when it has been overgrazed. It should not be grazed as short or as late into the fall as wheat. Barley does best on fertile, well-drained soils. It is sensitive to acidic soil conditions and poor fertility. Barley produces high quality silage or hay with a higher digestibility than other small grains, but lower yields. Good quality grazing can be obtained from early seeded barley. Triticale (X Triticosecale) is a high yielding forage crop that is gaining popularity. Triticale generally has a higher forage yield, but lower quality than wheat. It is a cross between rye and wheat. As such, it is adapted to a wide range of soils. Tolerance to low pH is better than wheat, but not as good as rye. Rye (Secale cereale) is the most cold tolerant and least exacting in its soil and moisture requirements of all small grains. Like wheat, rye can be sown in late August to provide fall grazing, excellent winter ground cover, and spring grazing. The rapid growth of rye, both in the fall and spring, makes it the most productive of the small grains for pasture. Rye is also the earliest maturing of the small grains. Rye tends to be a more consistent producer of spring pasture than wheat, although it quickly becomes stemmy and unpalatable in late spring. Winter Oats (Avena sativa) produce very palatable forage and are best adapted to well-drained soils. They do not perform as well under extremely dry or wet conditions as wheat or rye. Although oats produce high quality forage, yields tend to be lower than the other small grains. As a rule, the hardiest winter oat variety (Kenoat) is considerably less winter hardy than common wheat and barley varieties. In Kentucky, oats will usually overwinter 50% of the time. Like barley, winter oats TOLERANCE TO SUITABILITY FOR Cool season annual Yield potential 1 Tons DM/A Fall Growth Winter Hardiness Soil Acidity Poor Drainage Silage/ Baleage Hay Grazing Annual ryegrass 3-4 2 Good Fair – Good 3 Good Good Excellent Good Excellent Barley 1.5 - 2 Good Good Poor Poor Excellent Good Good Oats 2 - 2.5 Excellent Poor - Fair Fair Fair Excellent Good Good Rye 2.5 - 3 Excellent Excellent Good Fair Good Fair Good Triticale 2 - 3 Good Good Good Fair Good Fair Good Wheat 2 - 3 Good Excellent Poor Fair Excellent Good Good TABLE 1. CHARACTERISTICS OF COMMONLY USED COOL SEASON ANNUAL GRASSES 1 Harvested at boot stage, 2 Multiple harvests, 3 Dependent on variety
  7. 7. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 7 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Figure 1. Cool-season annual grasses have the potential to serve as a cover crop that protects the soil and a forage crop that can be grazed, hayed, or ensiled. (Photos by Chris Teutsch and Jimmy Henning) must be seeded in mid-September to be well established before cold weather arrives. Annual ryegrass (Lolium multiflorum) is a cool-season annual that can provide late fall, winter, and early spring grazing. Attributes of annual ryegrass include ease of establishment, high yields, high nutritive value, and later maturing than the small grains. In contrast to small grains, annual ryegrass continues to regrow in the spring until high temperatures limit growth in early summer. Annual ryegrass is commonly used to overseed summer pastures, thereby extending the useful season of this land area. It is adapted to all soil types and grows best at a pH of 5.7 or higher. The highest yields are obtained on fertile and well-drained soils with nitrogen fertilization. Optimizing Management Planting date. Ideally, cool-season annuals should be seeded from mid-August to mid-October. If fall grazing is desired, plant by early September. Later plantings will produce limited groundcover and little grazing in the fall and winter. Suppress existing sod. Suppressing competition from an existing sod or summer annual crop will help to ensure that you get a uniform stand. Ideally pastures and corn fields should be grazed closely or clipped and if weeds are present, sprayed with a nonselective herbicide just prior to planting. Planting method. Winter annuals can be planted on a conventional seedbed or no-till seeded. No-till seedings tend to support winter grazing better than conventional seedings and reduce the chance of soil erosion. Figure 2. Annual ryegrass is my favorite cool-season annual grass. It can be grown alone or in combination with other winter annuals grasses and legumes and provides multiple harvests or grazings in the spring Seeding depth. Seeding depth should be 1-2 inches for small grains and ½ to 1 inch for annual ryegrass. Seeding rates. Small grains seeded alone should be planted at a rate of 90-150 lb/A. Annual ryegrass seeded alone should be planted at a rate of 25 lb/A. A mixture of small grain and annual ryegrass should be seeded at a rate of 90 and 15 lb/A, respectively. If fall grazing is desired, use the higher end of the seeding rates. Crimson clover can be added at a rate of 10 lb/A. It is important to note that seeding rates for forage production will be about 2 to 3 times higher than those for cover crop seedings. Soil fertility. Apply phosphorus, potassium, and lime according to soil test results. If fall grazing is desired, apply 40-60 lb nitrogen/A at seeding. An additional 40-60 lb nitrogen/A should be applied in early-March to stimulate spring growth. For annual ryegrass only, an additional 40-50 lb nitrogen can be applied in mid-April after the first grazing or harvest. Grazing management. Ideally, winter annuals should be rotationally stocked. Grazing can begin once the seedlings are well anchored and have reached a height of 8-10 inches. Grazing should be stopped when a residual height of 3-4 inches has been reached. Harvesting as conserved forage. Small grains and annual ryegrass can be harvested as dry hay, but curing is often difficult due to large amounts of biomass and poor curing conditions. A better alternative is harvesting as silage or baleage. The optimal growth stage for harvest is the late boot or early head. This growth stage is the best compromise between yield and quality. As the plant matures, yield increases and quality declines. Best management practices for continued on page 8
  8. 8. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 8 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund silage and haylage can be found below. BMPs for Baleage • Cut at correct maturity • Grasses: late boot • Legumes: early bloom • Use mower-conditioner • Enhances wilting • Make swath as wide as possible to expose more of the forage to sunlight • Baling • Lower ground speed to make tighter bale • Use plastic or untreated sisal twine or net wrap • Make smaller bales to keep weight manageable • Wrapping • If possible, wrap at storage site • Wrap bales same day as baling • Use a high-quality UV stabilized wrap designed for silage • Apply MINIMUM 6 layers of wrap • Monitor bales for damage to silage film and patch any holes immediately with special UV resistant tape designed for outdoor use • Feed baleage same season since it does not keep as well as a conventional silo BMPs for Haylage • Cut at correct maturity • Grasses: late boot • Legumes: early bloom • Use mower-conditioner • Enhances wilting • Make swath as wide as possible to expose more of the forage to sunlight • Wilt to 55 to 65% moisture • Chop at correct theoretical length of cut (TLC) • 3/8 to ½” for hay crops • 3/8 to ¾” for corn crop • Fill silo quickly and compact well to reduce initial oxygen levels • Seal silo and keep sealed until fermentation is complete (2-3 weeks minimum) • Keep face smooth and feed rapidly enough to prevent spoilage • Discard any spoiled silage continued from page 7 Dairy Revenue Protection (DRP) Is Here! This recently released USDA product (DRP) is designed to protect dairy farmers from the decline in quarterly revenue from milk sales. Contact us today for more information about protecting one of the biggest risks to your operation. In Business Since 1972 1-800-353-6108 www.shelbyinsuranceagency.com sia@iglou.com We are an equal opportunity provider Glasgow, KY In Glasgow: On the Web: In Danville: 1-800-589-2174 www.burkmann.com 1-800-786-2875 Kubota Giveaway Sponsored In Part By: November 2021
  9. 9. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 9 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund W o r k s h o p O p p o r t u n i t y : E v a l u a t i n g M a r k e t O u t l e t s f o r D a i r y P r o d u c t s A n a l y z i n g c o s t s a n d r e t u r n s t o k n o w i f y o u ’ r e m a k i n g m o n e y C o n s i d e r a t i o n s w h e n a s s e s s i n g d i f f e r e n t m a r k e t o u t l e t s Topics W E D . O C T 6 T H 9 a m - 1 1 : 3 0 a m / E S T S T A T E S V I L L E , N C T H U R S . O C T 7 T H 9 a m - 1 1 : 3 0 a m / E S T S H E L B Y V I L L E , K Y T H U R S . O C T 7 T H 2 : 3 0 p m - 5 p m / C S T B O W L I N G G R E E N , K Y F R I . O C T 8 T H 9 a m - 1 1 : 3 0 a m / C S T M U R F R E E S B O R O , T N D A T E S & L O C A T I O N S For more information contact Hal Pepper: 931-486-2777 Office / 334-531-2631 Mobile hal.pepper@utk.edu | cpa.tennessee.edu R E G I S T R A T I O N FREE to Attend! Space is Limited Please register no later than September 27th REGISTER HERE: https://vadworkshop.questionpro.com F a r m e r s ' M a r k e t
  10. 10. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 10 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund 2021 State Fair Cheese Auction W hen the final bid was hammered down the 2021 Cheese Auction hit a new high. A wagon, a cutting board and a basket all filled with Kentucky’s best cheeses were auctioned off to an attentive crowd after the Open Supreme Champion Class. The bidding was brisk and the interest intense as the collection of Kentucky cheese was displayed under a spot lighted green shavings in the main show ring. The total of the final bids hit a new record of $19,250.00. The proceeds from the cheese auction go 100% to Kentucky dairy youth through Grand Champions and class winners in 4-H and FFA exhibitors. A huge thanks to all contributors that helped make this possible. Taul Equipment Kroger of Winchester Kentucky Kentucky Farm Bureau Mid America Select Sires Ag Credit of Central Kentucky Farm Credit Kentucky Dairy Development Council DFA Southeast and Mideast Dairy Alliance Southland Dairy Farmers Kentucky Milk Quality Conference All six of the Kentucky Dairy Breed Associations Wright Implement/John Deere McRay Feed Inc. First Financial Bank Burkmann Nutrition Kentucky Brown Swiss Association Owen Transport Services Cowherd Equipment Swiss Line Farm Stewart Gritton H.H. Barlow Sparrow Family Smith Family Glenn Sageser Tim Reynolds David Croshaw Ray Graves Eunice Schlappi Compton Dairy Larry and Carol Jaggers Larry B. and Betty Jaggers Nathan Franklin Ky Farm Bureau B+H Guernseys
  11. 11. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 11 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Republican, Democratic Lawmakers Unite With Farmers on Stepped-Up Basis L awmakers from both sides of the aisle are joining farmers and ranchers in calling for the preservation of stepped-up basis, a tax provision farmers and ranchers rely on to pass their operations down to future generations. Stepped-up basis allows a farmer to pay capital gains taxes only on the property's increase in value since the land was inherited, not on the full increase in value since it was purchased by that farmer's parents or grandparents. Without it, farmers and ranchers are worried their children and grandchildren will struggle too much with capital gains taxes to continue the family business. A call to action from Farm Bureau has generated 18,000 messages from farmers and ranchers to their representatives and senators. In their messages, farmers explain how their families and farms would be hurt by the elimination of stepped-up basis. In addition, many congressional lawmakers, both Democratic and Republican, have been very vocal in their support for retaining stepped-up basis. Earlier this summer, all 50 Senate Republicans wrote to President Joe Biden, urging him to drop the elimination of stepped-up basis from his American Families Plan proposal. "If the functional benefit of the step-up in basis were eliminated and transfers subject to the estate tax also become subject to income tax, as you have proposed, many businesses would be forced to pay tax on appreciated gains, including simple inflation, from prior generations of family owners-despite not receiving a penny of actual gain. These taxes would be added to any existing estate tax liability, creating a new backdoor death tax on Americans," the senators said in the letter. Rep. David Scott (D-Ga.), chairman of the House Agriculture Committee, also sent a letter to Biden, cautioning that the burden of paying for the programs in the president's American Jobs Plan and American Families Plan "cannot be borne by the next generation of farmers taking over the land. Any increase in inheritance tax for those taking over farmland is untenable and will further strain a farm economy that is just now beginning to recover from the strain of the pandemic," he wrote. More recently, former Sen. Max Baucus (D-Mont.) authored an op-ed in the Wall Street Journal in which he emphasized how devastating the elimination of stepped-up basis would be for family-owned businesses, ranches and farms. He called on fellow Democrats to preserve the step-up in basis and pointed to a letter from several House Democrats to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.), Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-Md.) and Ways and Means Chairman Richard Neal (D-Mass.). In the letter, the lawmakers explain why eliminating stepped-up basis is especially problematic for farmers and ranchers. "While the ability to simply sell a small part of an asset may work for those with shares of stocks, it would force farmers to break up land that may have been in their family for decades and seriously impact their ability to remain economically viable," the lawmakers wrote. Farm Bureau continues to urge farmers and ranchers to tell Congress how critical stepped-up basis is to their family businesses. Emails to representatives and senators can easily be sent from here.
  12. 12. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 12 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Dixie Dairy Report September 2021 Calvin Covington Fluid milk sales. USDA, recently, released its annual statistics on fluid milk and soft dairy product sales. 2020 fluid milk sales were 46.356 billion lbs. (see below) The following are observations: • Even though fluid sales declined for the past eleven (11) consecutive years, 2020 was the lowest decline. 2020 sales were only 0.1% or 51 million lbs. below 2019. However, 2020 sales received a boost from the Food Box program. I estimate this program purchased about one billion lbs. of fluid milk products last year. • Whole milk sales increased in 2020 for the seventh consecutive year, up 3.3% or 529 million lbs. from 2019. • Sales of 2% milk increased in 2020, the first yearly increase since 2010. They were up 3.6% or 554 million lbs. over the previous year. • The 2020 decline in fluid sales were due to lower sales of 1%, skim, and flavored milks. • 2020 is the third consecutive year for increased ice cream sales. 2020 sales of 6.463 billion lbs. of ice cream were 3.2% higher than 2019, and the highest ice cream sales since 1999. • After declining the past three (3) years, yogurt sales increased 3.3% in 2020 to 4.535 billion lbs. • Not to be overlooked, sour cream sales increased every year since 2003. 2020 sour cream sales were 1.427 billion lbs. Back in 2004 sour cream sales were only 987 million lbs. Demand. Turning to this year, the first table on the facing page shows the percent change in dairy demand for selected products, for the first half of this year compared to the same period last year. Exports are driving total demand so far this year. Exports are up 12.5% while domestic demand is up only 1.7% (total solids basis.) Exports represent 17.3% of total demand, a record high. However, exports during the second quarter of the year are lagging first quarter exports. American cheese is domestic demand’s shining star, while fluid milk sales are well below year ago levels. Based on various reports, it appears plant and blended (milk and plant) are cannibalizing fluid milk sales. On the other hand, organic sales are only slightly below a year ago. Production. For the second consecutive month, growth in milk production slowed. According to USDA, July production was 2.0% higher than last July. Slower growth was due to fewer cows, 3,000 less head than June. And, July milk production per cow was only 0.7% greater than last July. In July dairy farmers sent 3,700 more cows to slaughter compared to June, and 14,200 more than last July. South Dakota led the nation in July milk production increase at +17.0% followed by Texas +7.2% and Indiana +5.7%. Production was flat in California and up 4.6% in Wisconsin. In the three Southeast reporting states, the milk production decline is slowing in Florida. June production was even with last June, and July production was only down 0.5%. In Georgia, production has increased for five (5) consecutive months. It was up a strong 4.9% in June and 4.2% in July. Compared to a year ago, Georgia added 1,000 cows and milk per cow is up over 2.5%. On the other hand, Virginia’s production is below a year ago every month so far this year. Dairy product prices. Butter, after peaking in April, continues to move downward. The August CME butter price dropped a penny from July to $1.6815/lb. The up and down in cheese prices, along with the large block to barrel spread, FLUID MILK SALES 1970-2020
  13. 13. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 13 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Milk Prices FMMO 5 www.malouisville.com September 2021 Class 1 Advanced Price (@3.5%BF) $19.99 October 2021 Class 1 Advanced Price (@3.5%BF) $20.48 FMMO 7 www.fmmatlanta.com September 2021 Class 1 Advanced Price (@3.5%BF) $20.39 October 2021 Class 1 Advanced Price (@3.5%BF) $20.88 indicates uneasiness in the cheese market. The August CME block price increased nine cents from July to $1.7217/lb. On the other hand, the CME barrel price dropped six cents in August to $1.4158/lb. The August DPSR nonfat dry milk powder price moved up a penny to $1.2660/lb. Dry whey continues a downward track falling 4 cents in August to $0.5617/lb. Both the August Class III and IV prices are below $16.00, Class III at $15.95/cwt. and Class IV $15.92/cwt. Southeastern order Class I and blend prices. Total Class I producer milk volume was mixed in July. July Class I producer milk in the Appalachian and Southeast orders was down 12.0% and 9.8%, respectively, compared to last July. In Florida, July Class I was only down 0.6%. Combined, July Class I producer milk was 8.6% below the previous July in the three orders. All July blend prices were lower than June. August blend prices are projected to decline further as shown below. Feed prices. USDA feed cost data backs up what all dairy farmers are experiencing. The average cost of a 16% dairy ration needed to produce a cwt. of milk during the second quarter of 2021 was $11.11/cwt. This compares to $7.72/cwt. during the second quarter of last year. The $11.11/cwt. feed cost is the highest quarterly feed cost since 2013. PROJECTED* BLEND PRICES – Base Zones – SOUTHEASTERN FEDERAL ORDERS MONTH APPALACHIAN FLORIDA SOUTHEAST ($/cwt. at 3.5% butterfat – base zone) JUNE 2021 $20.19 $22.40 $20.39 JULY $19.61 $21.98 $19.80 AUGUST $19.32 $21.17 $19.41 SEPTEMBER $19.21 $21.09 $19.45 OCTOBER $19.53 $21.49 $19.74 NOVEMBER $19.31 $21.55 $19.63 *projections in bold PERCENT CHANGE IN DAIRY DEMAND FIRST SIX MONTHS OF 2021 VERSUS 2020 PRODUCT DOMESTIC EXPORT DOMESTIC+EXPORT Total Solids 1.7% 12.5% 3.4% Fluid Milk - Conventional NA NA -5.4% Fluid Milk - Organic NA NA -0.9% Fluid Milk - Total NA NA -5.1% American Cheese 8.1% 1.6% 7.9% Other Cheese 2.4% 2.5% 2.4% Butter -1.8% 146.0% 1.3% Dry Skim Milk Powder -31.5% 14.9% -0.1% Dry Whey -19.2% 23.8% 0.3%
  14. 14. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 14 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Wednesday, October 13 9:00am Introductions 9:10am Raw/ Finished Product Component Testing – Alli Wilson - Foss North America Introducing the FT-3 10:00am Automatic Milking Operations/Robotic Processors – Adam Palmer - Lely 11:00am Audits – Jeff Neuhauser – Momsmeals.com Insight into items a third party auditor may look for in your facility 12:00n Lunch on own 1:00pm Finished Product Testing – Wendy Rose - Western Kentucky Regional Lab 2:00pm Raw Milk Testing – Beth Johnson – Frankfort Central Lab 2:45pm Break 3:00pm Paperless Chart Recorders – Anderson/Negele 4:00pm GMP Roundtable – Plant representatives from throughout Kentucky Comparing notes on facility practices throughout the Commonwealth 6:00pm Banquet State Fair awards presentations LIVE AUCTION FOR FFA/4-H Tuesday, October 12 9:30am Registration Opens 10:00am Introductions/Housekeeping 10:10am State of Dairy in the Commonwealth – Eunice Schlappi A look at dairy and the dairy industry in the Commonwealth 11:00am Shelf Life Testing – Matt Morehead, KY Milk Safety Branch Guidelines for determining shelf life tests for fluid milk 12:00n Lunch on own 1:00pm Break Out Sessions KMQC Board of Directors Meeting Golf Tournament Sponsored by Bluegrass Ingredients Nature Hike/Activity presented by Dale Hollow SRP Staff 7:00pm Corn hole Tournament/Other Activities Evening meal included CASH BAR AVAILABLE
  15. 15. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 15 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund 2021 MILK QUALITY MILK QUALITY CONFERENCE CONFERENCE Dale Hollow State Resort Park (October 12-14, 2021) 5970 State Park Road Burkesville, Kentucky 42717 Make Checks Payable to KQMC. For questions regarding this conference contact Amanda Riddle or Matt Morehead. Office Number: 502- 564- 3340 Matt’s Number: 270- 293- 7748 Amandad.Riddle@ky.gov Matthew.Morehead@ky.gov KQMC C/O Milk Safety Branch 275 East Main Street HS1CB Frankfort KY 40602 For registration RSVP please contact Amanda. For questions please call Matt or Amanda. You can also register or become a sponsor on our new website! KQMC.Square.Site REGISTRATION Registration opens at 8:30am Registration fee is $100 SPONSORSHIP If you are interested in being a sponsor, the cost is $250.00. This includes one free regis- tration, a display table and an invitation to the Banquet. ROOM RATES Non Lake view room: $99.95 Lake view room: $119.95 GOLF SCRAMBLE Golf scramble rate is $45, and includes the cart fee Thursday, October 14 9:00am Introductions 9:10am Food Safety Plans – Food Safety Branch – Tentative Recalls and how to plan for them using your FSMA plan 10:15am Equipment Plans – Tentative CIP systems and plant upgrades 11:00am IMS Updates/Milk Branch Updates – Brian McAnelly 12:00n Conclusion/Dismissal – Travel Safe!
  16. 16. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 16 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund I n January, the Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) transitioned to new leadership with the appointment of Dr. Katie Flynn as the State Veterinarian and Dr. Alex Hagan as the Deputy State Veterinarian. Dr. Flynn grew up on a Hereford cattle and Standardbred racehorse farm in South Grafton, Massachusetts, and received her veterinary degree from University of Glasgow, Scotland. After graduation, she moved to California where she spent almost 18 years as a veterinarian with the California Department of Agriculture. During her career in California she conducted tuberculosis testing and investigated several cases of Tuberculosis in dairy cattle. Her extensive regulatory background and knowledge of dairy production will benefit Kentucky’s dairy producers. Dr. Alex Hagan is a 2011 graduate of Auburn University College of Veterinary Medicine. He is a native Kentuckian and currently lives in Shelbyville, KY. Dr. Hagan spent his previous 6 years in a Large Animal ambulatory practice based out of Shelby County. The mission of KDA’s Office of the State Veterinarian (OSV) is to promote and protect animal agriculture. OSV focuses on programs for livestock health, animal disease traceability and emergency response. The livestock health and surveillance activities concentrate on prevention, control and eradication of livestock regulatory diseases of concern through health monitoring activities and movement controls. The OSV relies on producers and veterinarians to be the eyes and ears in the field to report, unusual clinical signs in cattle or an increase in number of sick or dying animals. Regulatory response to a reportable disease may be limited to monitoring of the infected animal, to isolation and quarantine of the infected and exposed animals. Prompt response is critical to control further spread of the disease pathogen and to limit the impact to the livestock producers in the Commonwealth. Knowledge of the livestock demographics and movement is critical to protecting the health of Kentucky’s animal agriculture. During a disease outbreak, individual animal identification and movement records are essential to determining exposure risk for individual animals and the herd. Prompt identification and control of diseased animals through the utilization of electronic identification devices and electronic records, can limit the spread of disease. With federal cooperative agreement funding, the OSV will continue to distribute free radio frequency identification (RFID) tags for replacement breeding animals to producers who have a federal premises identification number. For more information on free RFID tags or premises identification number email statevet@ky.gov or call 502-782-5903. As the recent human COVID pandemic has demonstrated, preparedness for a foreign disease is critical to prompt control and business continuity. Drs. Flynn and Hagan are committed to focusing on emergency preparedness through the development, implementation and promotion of Secure Food Supply Plans within Kentucky. The Secure Milk Supply (SMS) Plan for Continuity of Business provides opportunities to voluntarily prepare before an outbreak with the development of a farm specific biosecurity and surveillance plan. During a disease outbreak, a producer with an approved specific Secure Milk Supply Plan will better position their dairy premises to: Limit exposure of their animals through enhanced biosecurity, Move raw milk to processing under a movement permit issued by state animal health officials, Maintain business continuity for the dairy industry, including their haulers, and processors during a Foot and Mouth Disease outbreak. For more information on the secure milk supply plan visit https://securemilksupply.org/. Protecting cattle health takes collaboration and communication with industry stakeholders, those in academia and state animal health officials. OSV looks forward to working with Kentucky dairy producers to protect the future of our dairy herd within the commonwealth. OSV welcomes individuals to contact us with questions or concerns, 502-573-0282 or email statevet@ky.gov. Office of the State Veterinarian CLASSIFIED Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plans (CNMPs). Livestock manure management and water quality BMPs. KY Division of Water permitting and compliance. Ben Koostra - Professional Engineer and NRCS Technical Service Provider - Lexington - 859-559-4662
  17. 17. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 17 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund E unice Schlappi has retired from the Kentucky Department of Agriculture. She served as the Dairy Marketing Specialist for 21 years. Eunice grew up the youngest of three girls, working on the family dairy farm in Lincoln County. While working on the family farm, she was also a relief milker for other area dairies and worked on local farms during the summer housing tobacco, baling hay and picking vegetables. After she graduated from the University of Kentucky, she began a 13-year career with Southern States. She served in management at the Richmond, KY location and managed the Berea, KY location for 5 years. She began working for the Ky Dept of Agriculture in 2000 as the dairy marketing specialist. She was able to build her job from the ground up. In that role, she worked with dairy farm families across the state, processors, heifer growers, milk promotion, international marketing, milk safety across the US, education, established Ky Kate, bus tours, organic, field days, value added, state fair, NAILE and so much more. Eunice will continue working with the dairy industry in various capacities. She looks forward to spending time with family, working on the home farm and traveling. Schlappi Retires from Kentucky Department of Agriculture
  18. 18. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 18 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Wildcat Wisdom Donna Amaral-Phillips UK Dairy Extension Group Why, Oh Why, Do I Need To Do That? Y oung children’s favorite questions often revolve around asking the “why” behind needing to do something or understanding of a given concept. That curiosity and a desire to understand the why behind concepts and practices continues throughout one’s life. From a manager’s standpoint, understanding the “why” behind a given management practice can help one, and more importantly those working on your dairy, appreciate the importance of completing daily tasks in a defined way. With all the ongoing tasks filling ones’ day, short cuts can become the new norm. Sometimes these shortcuts resulting in new habits are acceptable, but more times than not, they result in an outcome counter to the one desired. This can be especially true when it comes to the twice or three times a day task associated with milking cows and even the daily routines of the people that manage cows in robotic milking systems. As my father instilled in me early on, “milking time is where you make your money!”. So why not take a few minutes and review with all of those directly or indirectly associated with this important practice the whys behind routine milking-related management practices. The daily maintenance of the bedding on the surface of stalls and bedded packs is important in providing a comfortable, well- bedded, and dry surface for cows to lie down and rest for 12 to 14 hours daily. Bedding surfaces and bedding materials need to have a minimal amount of contamination from manure and, as such, the chore of maintaining these surfaces needs to be completed twice or more times daily depending on the housing system. Using proper amounts of bedding (sand bedding ≥ 6 inches deep such that the curb is not exposed, mattresses and mats bedded with ≥ 1 inch kiln-dried sawdust) helps improve cow comfort by reducing the number of cows with hock lesions and incidence of lameness. Bedding also helps wick moisture away from the udder and keeps cows cleaner. The backs of stalls need to have manure removed and stalls groomed at least at each milking and new bedding added, as needed, to provide a smooth, dry, relatively clean, and adequately bedded surface. Sand bedded stalls should have sand added such that the back curb is not exposed and sand is relatively level. Mattresses/mats should have at least 1 inch or more of fresh, dry bedding. These management practices help decrease exposure of a cow’s teat ends to environmental bacteria. Often times, bedding toward the back of stalls is replaced using extra bedding located in the front portion of stalls. Studies have shown that replacing bedding in this manner may result in replaced bedding containing very high bacteria counts, as cows have contaminated that bedding with manure from their hooves. Thus, utilizing fresh bedding may be the best choice when replacing bedding in the backs of stalls. Scraping of feeding and resting areas multiple times (usually twice) daily helps decrease the amount of manure cows walk through. This practice is part of not only reducing the exposure of teat ends to environmental causes of mastitis, but also decreases infectious causes of hoof diseases, such as foot rot and hairy heel warts. Moving cows to the parlor or barn Calm, quiet handling of dairy cows is essential for proper and efficient milk letdown. Stressed or frightened cows release the hormone, epinephrine (also known as adrenaline), which blocks the actions of oxytocin. Oxytocin is the hormone responsible for milk letdown. The negative effects of epinephrine can last for 20 to 30 minutes, thus illustrating the need for calm, smooth handling and movement of cows around milking time, be it to the milking area (holding pens or barn) or the completion of feeding chores just before or during the time cows are milked. Cows should be moved using a zip-zag pattern of movement from the back of a group of cows versus walking directly behind them in a straight line. Cows walk at half the speed of people (2 versus 3 to 4 mph). This pattern allows for the person walking with the cows to remain behind the shoulders of cows at the back of the group, thus moving cows forward at the cows’ normal walking speed resulting in the calm and efficient movement of cows toward the barn, parlor or milking setup. Milking Practices The proper execution of milking practices can help decrease the incidence of clinical and subclinical mastitis. All of us have seen these practices listed many times before, but the key is to practice each of them correctly at each and every milking. These protocols start with the people milking cows wearing disposable nitrile or latex gloves. Gloves are used to prevent the spread of disease, not only between cows, but also to prevent disease in people milking the cows. Our hands contain many cracks and crevices that bacteria can hide within, colonize, and allow for spread of bacteria between cows and within humans. Predip must be applied to the lower ¾ of all 4 teats, remain on the teat for 30 seconds, and then wiped off, including the very bottom of the teat, using a single-service paper towel or properly washed and dried cloth towel. Towels should
  19. 19. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 19 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund not be used on more than a single cow; this practice includes not turning the towel over and wiping a second cow. Predip contains a germicide designed to kill environmental sources of mastitis-causing bacteria, but to be effective must remain on the teat for 30 seconds. Stripping 3 to 4 streams of milk from cows before attaching the milking unit helps with milk letdown, flushes bacteria from the teat end, and allows one to detect abnormalities in milk and provide follow-up evaluation and attention for cows when needed. Milking units should be attached within 1 to 2 minutes after first touching the udder. To accomplish this, the correct number and order for attaching milking units must be followed. This practice is necessary for proper and timely milk letdown. Within 30 seconds of touching and/or cleaning the teats, oxytocin is released into the blood stream, which in turn results in milk flowing from the cells that synthesize milk, known as alveoli, into the ducts and cisterns of the mammary gland. Less than 20% of the total milk production is stored in the gland and teat cisterns and, thus, the majority must be “released” from the alveoli cells. For efficient oxytocin release, cows must not be frightened during the milking process and a repeatable milking procedure needs to be followed with the milking units attached within 2 minutes of the start of prepping the cow. Attaching the milking units too soon or too late will result in a delay in milk let-down and possible damage to the teat ends by the milking machine. This damage to the teat ends, known as hyperkeratosis, results in excess tissue at the teats end that bacteria can colonize and increases the chances of a cow getting mastitis. An effective post-dip should be applied to all 4 teats immediately after removing the milking unit, such that the bottom ¾ of the teat is covered. In robotic milking systems, managers need to check often that robots are applying post-dip adequately to all quarters of several cows in all robots and, if necessary, adjust the calibration for proper coverage. Post- dipping kills a significant number of bacteria on the teats, helps heal skin lesions, and optimizes teat skin condition. All of these factors help reduce the chances of bacteria entering the mammary gland. Post dipping is especially effective at reducing bacteria that are spread from cow to cow at milking time, such as Staph. aureus. Consistent application of post-dip helps reduce new infections, but will not reduce or eliminate existing infections. Teat dips should be stored in a cool, dry area and not allowed to freeze. Dip cups should be emptied and cleaned after every milking or if they become contaminated. Bottom Line The consistent and proper implementation of practices associated with the cleanliness of the resting areas, movement of cows to the milking area, and milking practices all have a direct impact on milk quality and production. Managers first need to understand and review on an ongoing basis why protocols must be followed in a certain manner. This information and understanding then needs to be conveyed and reemphasized to others involved in the milking process on farm. As my father correctly imparted to me as a young girl, “milking time is where you make or break your finances on a dairy”. Why not take time to review the why’s behind this important practice and with those who share the milking chores on your dairy operation?
  20. 20. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 20 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund
  21. 21. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 21 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund M ost consumers know that dairy products such as milk and cheese play a key role in the early developmental period of our lives. Dairy products, especially cow’s milk, are a natural source for the vitamins and nutrients that infants and young children need to promote strong physical – and even mental – growth. These facts are well documented. But as we grow older, the importance of dairy products is often forgotten, or at least does not have top-of-mind awareness, among different age groups. Yet, dairy products have a wide variety of benefits that apply to all ages.. With its new Dairy for the Ages ad campaign, Southland Dairy Farmers want to spotlight the important role dairy products play in our lives, from birth to senior years. Our new campaign is scheduled to launch this month, and will feature a series of promotional videos on our website, brochures targeted to different age demographics, and exclusive, new video segments from our partner Jill Castle, MS. RD., child nutrition expert. The elements of this program will help us tell the great story of the benefits of dairy, educating consumers about the importance of a healthy diet and sensible eating practices -- for all age groups. We think Dairy for the Ages is an important initiative. The core messaging that our new campaign will focus on: it doesn’t matter if you’re twenty-one or seventy-five -- dairy should still be an essential part of your diet. We’ll speak to parents of young children, of course, but we’ll also address the age demographics of 18-24, 25-34, 35-49, 50-65, and 65+. And we’ll speak to these audiences in relevant ways that touch on their lives, with dairy facts meaningful to them. As an example, we’ll discuss how milk contains vitamin D, B12, calcium, and other vitamins that stop bone degradation. We’ll show facts that confirm our bones need to be strong early in life in order to prevent or combat bonerelated diseases such as Osteoporosis later in life. The key message here is that keeping our bones healthy shouldn’t just be a concern when we reach our later years. If a younger person were to properly add more vitamin D and calcium to their diet, risks concerning their bones would be significantly lowered. The promotion of good bone health is just one benefit found in dairy products and just one of the messages we’ll deliver in Dairy for the Ages. We’ll also point out other key health messages: • Thanks to the calcium and other vitamins found naturally in dairy products, there are indications that the chance of getting colorectal cancer (colon cancer) is decreased. • Dairy products also play an important role in keeping the inner working of our body in top condition. B12 supports our body’s regulation by helping the red blood cells stay healthy. Dairycan help stave off certain heart conditions because of the rich amount of Vitamin D. The rate of getting stroke could be reduced significantly if an individual were to eat low-fat dairy products such as skim milk and fat-free yogurt. • Dairy is not just for keeping our bodies healthy; it is also an important asset for developing powerful muscles. A core part of an elite-level athletes’ diet is cheese. It contains phosphorous,which reduces the pain that often occurs in muscle building. • Perhaps for many age groups the most important message about dairy: it is a great source of protein. These are just a few beneficial attributes that make dairy stand out, even among other food groups. The numerous, helpful roles that dairy products play in our lives should not be understated. But sometimes they are, and we want to bring those positive messages to the forefront among different age groups – and speak to those consumers in the environment they understand: from teens to seniors. Dairy should be a staple in healthy diets across every segment of our lives. We hope our Dairy for the Ages campaign will help lift up some of the understated facts about dairy, and in turn,give more consumers the knowledge that will lead to longer, healthier lives. Vitamins, Nutrients, Vitamins, Nutrients, and Great Taste. and Great Taste. It’s Dairy for the Ages. It’s Dairy for the Ages.
  22. 22. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 22 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund State Fair Sees Cow Costume Contest  The Dairy Alliance was proud to sponsor the 2021 Kentucky State Fair Youth Dairy Cattle Costume Contest. Dairy farmers Judy and Rachel White have hosted the contest for several years. Participants and their cows showed off their themed group costumes and displayed their show skills to the judges. Further cultivating youths’ passion for working with cattle, 30 children participated in the contest in four age group categories: 5 years and under, 5-8 years, 9-13 years and 14-21 years. All the contestants received a goodie bag from The Dairy Alliance and the top three winners of each division won a gift card for ice cream from Dairy Queen. This year’s costume winners are:  Ages 5 and under: Bailey Komar and Lucy as Cookie Monster with a Chocolate Chip Cookie and Milk.  Ages 5-8: Leprechaun Grant Mitchell and Sprinkles—his pot of gold—under the rainbow.   Ages 9-13: Sophie Franklin and Party as Curious George and the Man in the Yellow Hat.   Ages 14-21: Skyla Lawless and Beth, dressed up as characters Miss Frizzle and Liz the Lizard from The Magic School Bus.  “Rachel and I are truly amazed at the creativity of these kids,” said Judy White regarding the participants’ costumes. “We are equally amazed at the outpouring of support from the sponsors of the contest. Some may look at this contest as something goofy and unimportant, but the level of creativity shows the dedication and skills these youth possess. We see the contest as a way for every youth exhibiting at the Kentucky State Fair Dairy Show, whether showing one little calf or a whole string of animals, to have a chance at winning and have fun at the same time! Thank you to The Dairy Alliance for being a major sponsor of our show!” Kentucky Schools Return with The Dairy Alliance Trainings  The Dairy Alliance has been providing dairy trainings as refreshers to nutrition and cafeteria staff for the new school year. Trainings consisted of Strive for 35!, which teaches how to optimally store milk for a safe and tasty product, Smooth & Smart, which provides tips for serving smoothies and yogurt at breakfast, Moo Brew, which introduces a newer program that allows students access to iced coffee using real milk, and Dairy: Good for Me, Good for the Planet, which highlights the sustainable work on dairy farms.  The goal of these school nutrition trainings is to ensure cafeteria staff prepare to safely store and transport cold milk for meal services as well as to think about innovative programs they can implement in their cafeterias. Several schools in the state have new equipment they received through grants to continue serving meals to students during virtual learning. This equipment can now be adapted and used for students returning to in-person learning. 
  23. 23. September - October 2021 • KDDC • Page 23 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Allied Sponsors PLATINUM AgCentral Alltech Bel Cheese Bluegrass Dairy & Food Burkmann Feeds Cowherd Equipment CPC Commodities Kentucky Department of Agriculture Kentucky Farm Bureau Kentucky Soybean Board Prairie Farms Shaker Equipment Sales Zoetis GOLD Farm Credit Services Givens & Houchins Inc. Mid-South Dairy Records Owen Transport Select Sires Mid-America SILVER Day and Day Feed Givens & Houchins Inc. Grain Processing Corporation KAEB Services Kentucky Veterinary Medical Association Luttrull Feed Nutra Blend Owen Transport South Central Bank Southland Dairy Farmers BRONZE Agri Feed International, LLC Bagdad Rolling Mills Bank of Jamestown Central Farmers Supply Dairy Farmers of America Hartland Animal Hospital Kentucky Corn Growers Association Limestone & Cooper Mammoth Cave Dairy Auction QMI Quality Mgt Inc. Nutra Blend Wilson Trucking Special Thanks to Our Sponsors
  24. 24. 176 Pasadena Drive Lexington, KY 40503 859.516.1129 ph www.kydairy.org Non-Profit US Postage PAID OCT 12-14 Kentucky Milk Quality Conference, Dale Hollow State Park OCT 23 Dare to Dairy, Scot County Fairgrounds 8:30am NOV 10 Young Dairymen Education & Fellowship Meal, Guthrie 12:00 pm NOV 11 Young Dairymen Education & Fellowship Meal, Columbia 12:00 pm NOV 11 Young Dairymen Education & Fellowship Meal, Lebanon 7:00 pm NOV 12 Young Dairymen Education & Fellowship Meal, Glasgow 12:00 pm NOV 18 KDDC Board Meeting Adair County Extension Office 10:00 am Calendar of Events

Official publication of the Kentucky Dairy Development Council

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