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November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 1
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund
Milk Matters
N o v e m b e r - D e c e m b e r
w w w. k y d a i r y. o r g
K
E
N
T
U
C
K
Y
Supported by
Commissioner Praises Contributions of Female Farmers
Ahead of Kentucky Women in Agriculture Day
page 5
Kentucky Dairy Partners Annual Meeting
page 8-10
Data Tells The Story That Genomics
Works Even In Small Herds
page 14
Chaney’s Milk Now Sold in 41 Kroger Stores
Across Kentucky and Indiana
A
win for dairy in Kentucky as Chaney’s welcomes
Fishmarket and Kroger into its family of retail
partners. In the making since they started bottling
milk back in June of 2019, Chaney’s is incredibly excited
to finally see their efforts come to fruition.
“We are so pleased a Kentucky Proud milk product will be
available in Kroger stores across the commonwealth,” Kentucky
Commissioner of Agriculture Dr. Ryan Quarles said. Fishmarket
and Kroger have proven time and time again their commitment
to supporting local farmers and purchasing local products.
Elizabeth Lunsford, owner of J.R. Chaney Bottling Company
fulfilled the family dream of bottling the milk from the jersey
cows on their fifth generation family dairy farm back in June
of 2019, a project that took almost 2 years to complete. “At
day one Houchens jumped on board welcoming us into some
of their top performing Crossroads IGA and Houchens stores
across the Bowling Green and Glasgow area. We would not be
where we are without them.” said Elizabeth Lunsford. “We are
just so appreciative of their faith in us from day one. We are
now in around 25 of their stores across the area”
As a result of a Kentucky Proud local food meeting put on
by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture back in 2019,
the Chaney family was connected with Steve Smith with
FishMarket and Eric Hilton with Kroger. Over time they stayed
in touch, and as Kroger began to grow its local food offerings,
Chaney’s was a product that checked a lot of boxes for them.
“I wanted these big accounts at day one” explained Elizabeth.
“But now, being two years into this, I am more confident than
ever that the product we are bottling is of the upmost quality,
giving us time to work through all new equipment hiccups
and really dial in our temperatures and processes”. explained
Elizabeth. “The growth has been incredibly exciting, and being
able to share a product we are so passionate about with so many
people across Kentucky, is just such an amazing feeling, and
something generations before would be so proud of”
“We’re extremely excited to work with Kroger,” fourth-
generation farmer Carl Chaney said. “This new venture not only
allows our farm to remain sustainable for future generations, but
brings our quality milk to new customers. Our milk comes from
100 percent Jersey cows. It’s high quality milk. It just tastes
different.”
The Chaney family has hopes that being able to help put a
face to their milk, not only helps with growth of their product,
but also provides an advantage to the entire dairy industry.
Kroger is offering Chaney’s whole, chocolate, 2% and half and
half in various sizes. The whole and chocolate milk are a true
whole product and are not standardized. The Chaney family
feels that in addition to being all jersey milk, this is another key
differentiator for them. The Chaney family expresses sincere
gratitude to all individuals who have supported them along this
journey. To learn more about Kroger and other retail partners of
Chaney’s milk, please visit https://www.chaneysdairybarn.com/
where-can-i-buy-it.
November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 2
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund
2021 KDDC Board of Directors & Staff
Executive Committee
President: Freeman Brundige
Vice President: Charles Townsend, DVM
Sec./Treasurer: Tom Hastings
EC Member: Greg Goode
EC Past President: Richard Sparrow
Board of Directors
District 1: Freeman Brundige 731.446.6248
District 2: Josh Duvall 270.535.6533
District 3: Keith Long 270.670.1388
District 4: Bill Crist Jr. 270.590.3185
District 5: Tony Compton 270.378.0525
District 6: Mark Williams 270.427.0796
District 7: Greg Goode 606.303.2150
District 8: Steve Weaver 270.475.3154
District 9: Jerry Gentry 606.875.2526
District 10: Terry Rowlette 502.376.2292
District 11: Stewart Jones 270.402.4805
District 12: John Kuegel 270.316.0351
Equipment: Tony Cowherd 270.469.0398
Milk Haulers: Mike Owen 270.392.1902
Genetics: Dan Johnson 502.905.8221
Feed: Tom Hastings 270.748.9652
Nutrition: Elizabeth Lunsford Alltech 859.553.0072
Dairy Co-op: Stephen Broyles 859.421.9801
Veterinary: Dr. Charles Townsend 270.726.4041
Finance: Todd Lockett 270.590.9375
Heifer Raiser: Bill Mattingly 270.699.1701
Former Pres.: Richard Sparrow 502.370.6730
Employee & Consultants
Executive Director: H.H. Barlow
859.516.1129
kddc@kydairy.org
DC-Central: Beth Cox
PO Box 144, Mannsville, KY 42758
bethcoxkddc@gmail.com
859.516.1619 • 270-469-4278
DC-Western: Dave Roberts
1334 Carrville Road, Hampton, KY 42047
roberts@kydairy.org
859.516.1409
DC-Northern: Jennifer Hickerson
PO Box 293, Flemingsburg, KY 41041
j.hickersonkddc@gmail.com
859.516.2458
KDDC
176 Pasadena Drive • Lexington, KY 40503
www.kydairy.org
KY Milk Matters produced by Carey Brown
President’s Corner Freeman Brundige
N
othing raises my spirits
and reaffirms my love of
the dairy business like
seeing the most beautiful cows
in the world and the great people
who bred them and/or take care
of them. I have been fortunate
enough to get to attend the Ky
State Fair this summer, and the
World Dairy Expo and the North
American Dairy Show this fall. I
am very proud that the NAILE
had large increases in entries in
almost all breeds.
Seems like these days, even
though some of us are still showing, the seniors among us congregate
and tell tall tales about shows and cows remembered years and even
several decades ago. What wonderful times to relive. No one ever
says I wish I had never started doing this. And we all realize that
the friendships we have made, many from far away farms, are more
important than how the cows placed years ago.
I know I have been down this road before, but I still hope in
this day of larger and larger dairies that there can remain a personal
attachment to the cow. The creator of our whole industry!
We still are facing lots of challenges in our ability to have a
profitable business. KDDC is trying to work on different fronts to
help influence the decisions being made to be of the best interest of
both our Kentucky farmers and our neighbors in the other Southeast
states. Hopefully, some of the needed assistance will be available
during this holiday season. Maybe we can all find a little time to be
thankful for the good things that we still enjoy in this high-pressure
business. I do think there are some trends and programs that could
give us some better days ahead. More and more people are starting
to understand the situation we are and have been in concerning our
pricing and marketing problems
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For more information, contact:
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November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 4
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund
Executive Director Comments
H H Barlow
T
he holiday season is upon us.
Thanksgiving has been celebrated
many ways in my life. I remember as
a boy, my mother would make a big pot of
tomato soup and a tray of peanut butter and
crackers that we would eat in the tobacco
stripping room. Dad and Mom, my two older sisters and me.
Dad loved Thanksgiving break because he knew we would
get a lot of tobacco stripped those three days we were out
of school. I wasn’t happy about spending Thanksgiving that
way but looking back, we were together with no TV, no cell
phone, and we talked… something that is too easily lost
today.
Obviously, our family Thanksgiving evolved from the tobacco
barn to, now, one of our big family events…Enjoying a large
meal together and playing in our own Turkey Bowl…a Barlow
football game full of fun, except for the occasional tiff among
our competitive boys. But it’s all about family, togetherness and
having fun.
Just think about it, the freedom, and the beauty of where we
live, the abundant food for our tables and the gathering of loved
ones. We are blessed beyond measure, so let’s pause, reflect, and
thank God for our lives and blessings.
During Thanksgiving and Christmas, let’s think about what
binds us dairymen all together…It’s our COWS, the one thing
we all have in common, regardless of our farm size or diversity
of operations and equipment. The cows are the constant. What
is it about those cows that we build our lives around them?
These gentle giants with their big eyes and wet noses that are
100% dependent upon us for their existence. They cause us a
tremendous amount of labor. They are very expensive to feed,
house and milk 365 days a year with no holidays. However, they
reward us with their production and provide us the income we
need to live. It’s definitely a synergistic relationship…We take
care of them, and they reward us.
People ask me often, “Why do you continue to milk cows?” I
quickly answer, they are my therapy, walking among them, having
them rub up against me or even nudge me for a good scratch or
rub without a word or complaint. I know being a dairy farmer is
an extremely tough business, but I hope, during these holidays,
you can look at your cows as a gift. Thank you, God, for the
opportunity to work with and shepherd these wonderful animals.
My last several newsletters have been pretty challenging to
report. Now, good news for most anyone in the dairy business. I
believe we are headed into a season with a more positive outlook.
Milk prices today and futures prices both look much higher than
we experienced for much of 2021.
There are many factors contributing to this encouraging outlook
that should give us a sustained period of better prices, hopefully
for the next six months. Demand for milk products is robust and
exports are higher than ever. Milk production across the world
is down. Europe and Oceania are producing much less than last
year. In the Netherlands, environmentalists are demanding they
cut their milking herd by 25%. This crazy mentality could spread
throughout Europe. In America we must prepare to resist these
flawed ideas that it will significantly help the environment. And
do they not understand the need for food and what a valuable
food source milk is especially in protein and calcium.
Not only is production down overseas, but the milking herd in
the US is down by over 100,000 cows since last summer. Milk
production in October was .5% less than a year ago. All Class III
and Class IV futures prices are over $19 for every month in 2021.
Things can change quickly, but I believe the future looks much
brighter.
Of course, input costs continue to rise, especially feed, labor,
fuel and crop costs. Good management of the entire farming
operation will be more critical than ever to secure a sustainable
profit.
KDDC’s new MILK 4.0 program has several tools that can
help you navigate these higher input costs. Please contact your
consultant to get signed up. There are financial awards available if
you are on DHIA and can show improvement in your pregnancy
rate and somatic cell count over the last 12 months.
Don’t forget our genomic testing program. MILK 4.0 will
provide the testing for around $13/sample. This tool can
accurately identify your top animals needed to breed for
replacements, as well as identifying animals which can be bred to
beef sires for a more valuable crossbred calf.
I’m happy to announce the hiring of Patty Holbert from Larue
County as our new dairy consultant for the central region. She
has a lifetime in the dairy industry with many roles from owning
her own dairy herd to being a consultant for a national dairy
company. We miss Meredith Scales, but I think Patty is a worthy
new employee, ready to advance our dairy farmer’s success.
I started my comments with stories of my Thanksgiving
experiences. I’m closing my comments by asking each of us to
focus on the Christmas season and the real reason for Christmas.
Christmas trees are beautiful, giving and receiving gifts are
very exciting and getting together with families and friends is
wonderful, but we must never forget the true reason for our
celebrating. There are troubles all around our country and there
is only one answer to the destruction, polarization and discontent
that appears everywhere…That ANSWER is the LOVE of Jesus
Christ.
Please join me in serious prayer for our country, our friends and
enemies and petition God to heal our land.
God bless each and every one of you this Christmas and raise a
glass of egg nog and custard to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ.
November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 5
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund
Commissioner Praises Contributions of Female Farmers
Ahead of Kentucky Women in Agriculture Day
NUMBER OF FEMALE FARMERS ROSE IN 2017 USDA AG CENSUS
R
ecognizing the importance of women in Kentucky’s
farming sector, Commissioner of Agriculture Dr.
Ryan Quarles spoke at the annual Kentucky Women
in Agriculture (KIWA) annual conference in Lexington, a
day before the state officially celebrated “Kentucky Women
in Agriculture Day,” on Tuesday, October 19.
“Anytime women find a seat at the table in any profession,
it’s a win,” Commissioner Quarles said. “That follows true
in agriculture, as well. Recent survey data has shown women
make up nearly 40 percent of our producers. I was happy to join
Kentucky Women in Ag today to help celebrate the contribution
our female producers have to our farm economy.”
KWIA’s membership is comprised of women who own
and operate farms and agribusinesses, as well as agriculture
entrepreneurs, state and federal personnel, ag educators and
students, and consumers. The annual conference provides
attendees with the opportunity to network and nurture a
recognized agriculture and agribusiness community. By
empowering women through education, involvement, and action,
KIWA has a positive influence on Kentucky agriculture.
That influence is important, as the number of female farmers
in Kentucky keeps growing. In 2017, 42,946 women farmed
in Kentucky, up 36.7 percent from the number identified in the
previous 2012 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) census.
Of those, 33,550 were involved in making day-to-day decisions
on the farm, 26,215 were the principal producers on their farms,
and 12,648 listed farming as their primary occupation, the census
found.
The Census of Agriculture is a complete count of U.S. farms
and ranches and the people who operate them. Even small plots
of land - whether rural or urban - growing fruit, vegetables or
some food animals. The Census of Agriculture, taken only once
every five years, looks at land use and ownership, operator
characteristics, production practices, income and expenditures.
USDA will start collecting information for the next census in
2022.
November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 6
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund
On-Farm Grain Storage: A Game-Changer for Many Producers
Farmers see many advantages to storing their grain crops at home
Kentucky Farm Bureau
A
s Hurricane Ida made landfall near the mouth of
the Mississippi, no one could predict the damage
it would cause including stopping most river traffic.
And while the flow of barges has somewhat returned to
normal, the fear of many farmers was how to get their
grain crops on their way to export markets by way of the
Mighty Mississippi.
Kentucky Farm Bureau Second Vice President Sharon
Furches said, while many people don’t realize the importance
of the waterways as an essential part of the country’s overall
infrastructure, she and husband Tripp, owners and operators of
Furches Farms, know all too well if river traffic stops, grain
leaving the farm becomes an issue.
“We had about 80,000-bushel capacity back in 1992,” she said.
“We have strategically added to that over the years and today we
have 600,000-bushel storage and the infrastructure to dry and
manage those bushels. We have come to depend on the ability to
store grain, but still need those grain barges to keep moving.”
And while the Furcheses said they didn’t have a crystal ball
to look into the future, they saw the multiple advantages such
storage facilities would have for their farming operation some
time ago.
“As the farm grew, we knew we needed more on-farm storage,
and that became a big piece of our marketing plan,” she said.
“The importance of it really elevated for us in particular years
when marketing was kind of a make-or-break thing for the
farm.”
From purely a marketing standpoint, on-farm grain storage
made sense for Furches Farms.
“The stars don't always align, but this year we have higher
prices in the grain market, and we have good yields at this point
in time,” Furches said. “We're hoping that all of that continues,
but both of those things together make on-farm storage even
more important.”
But add a hurricane into the mix and consider the quantity of
grain from this area that travels down the Mississippi River, and
you’re left with wide-spread impact across the region as barge
traffic slowed to a crawl after the August storm came through.
While little normalcy has returned to the situation, Furches
said there was a period of time when some producers were
looking at a very difficult situation when it came to storage for
their harvested grain.
“Not everyone contracts their crop or grain, and if they don't,
the elevators on the river were at a point where they had been
forced to limit the grain that they can take, because of the
backups caused by the hurricane, only accepting grain that they
had under contract,” she said.
Even with the situation improving these circumstances serve
as an example of just how valuable on-farm grain storage can be.
Caldwell County Farm Bureau President Craig Roberts, and
owner of Roberts Farms, has been proactive in his efforts to
install storage for his grain crops, one of which is white corn.
“In 2011, we put in two 55,000-bushel bins and a
10,000-bushel wet tank and a looped system. This year we
added a 200,000-bushel bin,” he said. “And having good storage
capability has been a game-changer.”
Over the years, Roberts has created a network of storage bins
in addition to these and plans to add another 10,000-bushel bin
for soybeans. For him, having adequate grain storage is as much
about economics as it is convenience.
“We watch the markets every day and I have already sold corn
for the 2022 crop; it’s contracted for December of ‘22, and I’ve
already sold some soybeans for the fall of ’22,” he said. “The
price was right, and I hated not to, and who knows, we could see
seven- or eight-dollar beans next year. I don't think we will, but I
can say, "Hey, I've got some sold at $12.”
Having the ability to store large amounts of grain has enabled
Roberts to be market-savvy not only for sold grain, but also in
watching barge freight charges.
“The hurricane affected freight prices on barges. But for years,
at this time, barge freight has gone up and that cuts the farmer’s
dollar on soybeans and corn,” he said. “If you have the storage
facility to hold that grain until after the first of the year, and see
that those prices have dropped some, it has helped me a lot.”
Bill Clift of C&C Ag Enterprises LLC, who constructed the
most recent grain bin on the Roberts’ farm as well as the original
facility, fully understands how beneficial those bins can be,
especially in a year like 2021.
He touted timeliness as a key factor that makes on-farm grain
storage such an asset, along with increased farmer autonomy and
crop quality control.
“Granaries are getting tougher and tougher to deliver to during
fall harvest. To facilitate harvest, the farmers, including myself,
want to be able to store the grain and worry about getting it to
market afterwards,” he said.
Clift, who has been constructing grain bins for 25 years, has
seen an increase in demand for his services building on-farm
grain storage facilities.
November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 7
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund
“We built a lot of bins in 2013 and it’s just been a steady climb
since then. And we’ve gone from building just basically single
grain bins to now there’s people that, they’re wanting to do the
whole facility,” he said.
Furches looks at grain bins as a necessity as opposed to a
luxury.
“It's an absolute necessity, and the sizes of these bins can vary
depending on whatever is appropriate for an individual farmer,”
she said. “We have had people ask us to store grain for them
and we just don’t have any extra storage to spare right now. As
crops get bigger and dealing with market situations gets harder,
you can’t afford to find yourself in a situation where you need
storage and don’t have it, not to mention the difficulties Mother
Nature can throw at you.”
S
outhland Dairy Farmers
are making it possible
for any high school
athletic program to refuel
athletes with chocolate milk
by introducing the “Team Up
With Chocolate Milk” program.
Our organization has created
this grant program to provide
up to $2,500 to sports teams
for the purchase of chocolate
milk for an entire season.
Applications are accepted
through our website (www.
southwestdairyfarmers.com or
www.southlanddairyfarmers.
com) for each sports season during the outlined time periods. If your
program’s application is accepted, your sports program will receive
chocolate milk for practices and games and will give students the
opportunity to see why chocolate milk is the ultimate recovery beverage.
Each school that participates in this program will agree to display
signage at sporting events, a visit from the Mobile Dairy Classroom and
multiple other requirements that will promote Southland Dairy Farmers
and chocolate milk as the ultimate recovery beverage. This program will
be available for winter, spring and fall sports with separate application
deadlines for each one.
The goal is for teams to continue drinking chocolate milk after the grant has
come to an end. No matter how you choose to stay active, Chocolate Milk is
the original sports drink that can help you stay at your peak. With 13 essential
vitamins and nutrients, Chocolate Milk can restore energy and rebuild muscle.
It contains an optimal carbohydrate to protein ratio, which is critical for helping
refuel tired muscles after strenuous exercise and can enable athletes to exercise
at a high intensity during subsequent workouts. And best of all, this nutrient
dense recovery drink is all natural.
Encourage your local high school sports teams to apply for this nutritional
opportunity to try chocolate milk after their workouts. For more information,
visit www.southlanddairyfarmers.com.
It’s Time To Team Up With Chocolate Milk CLASSIFIED
Comprehensive Nutrient
Management Plans (CNMPs).
Livestock manure management and
water quality BMPs. KY Division of
Water permitting and compliance.
Ben Koostra - Professional Engineer
and NRCS Technical Service
Provider - Lexington - 859-559-
4662
John Deere 4020 -3 to choose from
H S 430 - double beater spreader
Several manure spreaders in stock
John Deere 5325 - 2 wd drive with
loader John Deere 7200- cab -16
speed 5612-Esch High speed Grain
Drill Horning Headers - ready to
ship!
John Deere 3975 - base unit- $$$
save
Artex SB 600 Spreader -in stock
John Deere 468 - net $14,500
John Deere 566- twine $12,000
Meyer 510 TMR mixers - In STOCK
Cloverdale 500 T -TMR mixers - in
Stock
Stoltzfus 10 ton Litter spreader
$30,000 Caterpillar 242B skid
loader-$17,500 New Holland 790
choppers-@$7500 John Deere
8200 drills $5850 Gehl 8335 feeder
wagon $7500 Patz 290- auger
feeder wagon$8500 Artex SB 200-
vertical beater- for rental Stoltzfus
lime - litter- fert cu 50 $19,500 JD
6400- loader-4wd-open $24,750
Farmco feeder wagons-5 in stock-
call John Deere 7405 -4wd -canopy
-$24,750
www.redbarnandassociates.com
Charlie B. Edgington 859-608-9745
November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 8
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund
SAVE THE DATE
FEBRUARY 22-23, 2022
Hybrid Format - In Person and Virtual
Sloan Convention Center, 1021 Wilkinson Trace
Bowling Green, Kentucky
November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 9
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund
dairy producers PRE REGISTRATION FORM dairy farmers only
ON-LINE REGISTRATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE AT KYDAIRY.ORG
ATTENDEE 1 ATTENDEE 2
ADDRESS
HOME PHONE CELL PHONE
EMAIL
COUNTY
I have a total of cows.
• There is a charge of $30 per dairy farm family to attend Feb 22 and/or Feb 23 (LIMIT 4 PER FARM)
• There is also a charge of $50 per hotel room night.
• Both fees are payable at the conference but please send registration to the address below.
I acknowledge $30 charge per dairy farm (one charge for one or two days-not each day)
I will attend the YDPC on Tuesday, Feb 22 (full day of meeting.)
I will attend Kentucky Dairy Awards Banquet Tuesday evening, Feb 22
I will need a hotel room for Tuesday night, Feb 22. Cost is $50 per room night for a dairy farmer
available to qualified young producers (n/c for KDDC board members).
I will attend Wednesday, Feb 23 - Kentucky Dairy Partners Meeting and lunch
I will attend virtual sessions.
All fees payable to KDDC at the conference or online at kydairy.org.
Send completed registration to: Eunice Schlappi • 554 Davenport Rd • Harrodsburg, KY 40330
schlappifarms@gmail.com
November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 10
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund
kentucky dairy partners annual meeting
Exhibit & Conference Reservation Form
February 22-23, 2022 – Sloan Convention Center, Bowling Green, KY
REPRESENTATIVE
ADDRESS
$400 Booth space* (includes booth space and (1) two day registration - all meals incuded)
Indicate below if you are a Platinum or Gold KDDC sponsor or if you are government/education group:
NAME OF COMPANY
EMAIL
PHONE
ATTENDEE 2
ATTENDEE 1
ATTENDEE 4
ATTENDEE 3
*Platinum KDDC sponsors – free booth space, (1) free two day conference registration
*Gold KDDC sponsors - $300 booth space, (1) free two day conference registration
*no booth charge for government, educational, etc. (HOWEVER, does not include attendee registrations)
$50/person Tuesday - Young Dairy Producers Meeting/banquet (Feb 22) x (number attending)
$50/person Wednesday - KDP conference registration (Feb 23) x (number attending)
TOTAL ENCLOSED Please make checks payable to: KDDC (KY Dairy Development Council)
Kentucky dairy producers will be charged $30 per dairy farm for the two
day conference (limit 4 attendees) – separate registration
Yes, we would like to provide a door prize
ITEM
Yes, we would like to provide an item for the silent auction
ITEM
What type of display do you have?
(i.e. full floor, table top, pull ups, other)
Is your booth larger than 10 w x 6 d?
Do you need electricity?
Send completed registration to: Eunice Schlappi • 554 Davenport Rd • Harrodsburg, KY 40330
schlappifarms@gmail.com
November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 11
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund
KDDC and WKU
2022 Milker Trainings
K
DDC and WKU are currently planning
some milker training workshops for
early 2022. These workshops will be
led by Gretchen Colon Suau.
Gretchen is a graduate student in the
Agriculture Program at Western Kentucky
University. She started her Master’s degree
this Fall 2021 in Animal Science with a focus
on dairy technologies. She is working with
the newly established WKU SmartHolstein
Lab. Working with cows is what she loves
the most. While she is studying, as part of an
Assistantship, she is also working in the WKU
Dairy Farm milking cows, feeding calves,
and assisting as needed. She's fascinated
with topics like cow comfort, cow behavior,
animal handling, precision dairy, udder health
and pretty much everything cow related.
Before coming to WKU, Gretchen did her
undergraduate studies in Animal Science in the
University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus.
After graduating, she worked as a Farm
Manager for almost 3 years in a Dairy Farm in
southwest Puerto Rico. After that experience,
for a while, she worked as a Consultant for
dairy farmers, giving tools and strategies to
improve their farms.
After all the experiences gained and while
she keeps educating herself, she has realized
that helping dairy farmers is one of the things
she wants to do most. She wants to contribute
to the industry and be an asset as well. Being
from Puerto Rico, she knows she can help
Spanish-speaking employees that are a big
part of the dairy industry. She can be that link
to understand the dairy farmers’ needs and
the dairy employees’ performance. Reviewing
processes and protocols is an important part
of communication between these two for
consistency and success. During her time at
WKU, she hopes to work directly with dairy
producers. Dates and locations of workshops
will be announced after the new year.
Cowherd Equipment
& Rental Inc.
Cowherd Equipment & Rental, Inc.
Cowherd Equipment & Rental, Inc.
1483 Old Summersville Rd.
1483 Old Summersville Rd.
Campbellsville, KY 42718
Campbellsville, KY 42718
Office 270-465-2679
Office 270-465-2679
Tony 270-469-0398
Tony 270-469-0398
Vince 270-469-5095
Vince 270-469-5095
Cowherd Equipment & Rental, Inc.
For More Information:
Cowherd Equipment & Rental, Inc
1483 Old Summersville Rd.
Campbellsville, KY 42718
Office 270-465-2679
Tony 270-469-0398
Vince 270-469-5095
Penta 4030
Tire Scraper
J&D Head Locks
Hagedorn 5440
Manure Spreader
Silage Defacer
Penta 4930
Cowherd Equipment & Rental, Inc.
For More Information:
Cowherd Equipment & Rental, Inc.
1483 Old Summersville Rd.
Campbellsville, KY 42718
Office 270-465-2679
Tony 270-469-0398
Vince 270-469-5095
Penta 4030
Tire Scraper
J&D Head Locks
Hagedorn 5440
Manure Spreader
Silage Defacer
Cow
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Tire Scra
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Silage Defacer
Roto-Mix Mixers
Tire Scraper Hoosierland 1450
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November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 12
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Dixie Dairy Report
November 2021
Calvin Covington
Class prices. All October federal order class prices were
higher than September which means higher blend prices. The
October Class I Mover advanced $0.49/cwt., Class II $0.19/
cwt., Class III $1.30/cwt. and Class IV $0.68/cwt. The Class II
and IV prices are the highest October prices since 2014. The
November Class I Mover, which uses advanced pricing and is
based on October dairy product prices, is $17.98/cwt. This is
$.98/cwt. higher than October.
As the above chart shows, Class IV (butter + powder) has
steadily moved higher this year. Going from a low of $13.19/
cwt. in February to $17.04/cwt. in October. Strong exports,
lower production in the European Union and New Zealand,
lower domestic butter and nonfat dry milk powder (NDM)
production, are all lifting the Class IV price. Looking ahead, the
Class IV price is projected to exceed the Class III price in the
coming months, with a Class IV price between $18.00 - $19.00/
cwt.
The CME butter price at the beginning of October was
$1.7475/lb. On November 5, butter closed at $1.9350/lb., the
highest in almost two years. Strong demand for cream products,
higher cheese and lower NDM production which results in less
cream for churning, a major butter plant off-line due to a fire,
along with seasonal butter demand are, combining, to move
butter prices upward.
Declining cheese prices will push the Class III price lower
in November. Record high cheese production and building
inventories (September American cheese inventory over 9%
above a year ago) are moving cheese prices lower. At the CME
on November 5, blocks were down to $1.5850/lb. and barrels
at $1.5025/lb. Blocks and barrels a month ago, were at $1.8500
and $1.7450, respectively.
Fluid milk sales. In the three southeastern federal orders,
third quarter Class I producer milk volume is mixed. In the
Florida order, it is 2.3% higher than the same quarter a year ago.
However, in the Southeast order, third quarter Class I producer
milk volume is 3.4% and the Appalachian order 5.4% lower
than last year. Nationwide, in all federal orders, Class I producer
milk is 2.8% lower for the third quarter compared to the same
quarter last year. Class I producer milk volume provides a quick
and accurate method to track fluid milk sales, plus it is what
producers are paid for
Milk production. September marks the fourth consecutive
month for a lower monthly increase in milk production.
According to USDA, September production was only 0.2%
higher than last September. USDA also revised August numbers,
resulting in August production only 0.6% higher than a year
earlier. Fewer cows and less milk produced per cow is slowing
2021 MONTHLY CLASS PRICES
November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 13
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Milk Prices
FMMO 5
www.malouisville.com
November 2021
Class 1 Advanced Price
(@3.5%BF)
$21.38
December 2021
Class 1 Advanced Price
(@3.5%BF)
$22.57
FMMO 7
www.fmmatlanta.com
November 2021
Class 1 Advanced
Price (@3.5%BF)
$21.78
December 2021
Class 1 Advanced
Price (@3.5%BF)
$22.97
milk production growth. Each month since May, the nation’s dairy herd has declined.
More dairy cows are going to slaughter each month. For the second consecutive
month, milk produced per cow was lower than a year earlier.
In the 24 milk reporting states, September production was higher in eleven states,
and flat or lower in the other thirteen states. South Dakota reported the highest
increase (+14.6%), followed by Georgia (+3.8%) and Wisconsin (+3.3%). New
Mexico posted the largest milk production decline (-12.5%), followed by Washington
(-7.9%) and Florida (-6.8%). The Southeast, as shown below, is the only region of the
country reporting a milk production decline for the year-to-date. In the ten Southeast
states, only two states show production increases for the first nine months of the year,
Georgia +1.1% and North Carolina +2.7%.
Blend prices. October blend prices are projected $0.30-$0.40/cwt. higher than
September. November blend prices are projected to move up another $0.80-$1.00/
cwt. December blend prices are projected to be the highest for the year, with the
Florida blend around $23.00/cwt. and the Appalachian and Southeast orders’ blend
close to $21.00/cwt. 2022 blend price projections are higher than last month based on
improving butter and NDM prices. Currently, I project 2022 blend prices averaging
about $1.50-$1.75/cwt. higher than 2021. My forecast is not as optimistic as current
futures prices indicate. I see both domestic and export demand a major challenge next
year due to inflation, supply chain issues, and China importing less due to their strong
inventory levels and economic issues. Plus, strong cheese inventories and production
will keep a lid on cheese prices.
PROJECTED* BLEND PRICES – Base Zones – SOUTHEASTERN FEDERAL ORDERS
MONTH APPALACHIAN FLORIDA SOUTHEAST
($/cwt. at 3.5% butterfat – base zone)
AUGUST 2021 $19.24 $21.11 $19.60
SEPTEMBER $19.37 $21.22 $19.70
OCTOBER $19.79 $21.68 $20.02
NOVEMBER $20.80 $22.74 $20.87
DECEMBER $21.20 $23.05 $21.23
JANUARY 2022 $20.94 $22.85 $21.00
*projections in bold
REGIONAL CHANGE IN MILK PRODUCTION & COW NUMBERSAND SHARE OF
TOTAL MILK PRODUCTION
REGION MILK PRODUCTION 2021 VS 2020 SHAREOFTOTALMILK
(Percent Change)
(Change in number of
Dairy Cows)
(Percent)
Midwest 3.7% 66,000 31.7%
California 1.6% -1,000 18.5%
Northwest 0.4% -8,000 15.2%
Northeast 0.2% -2,000 13.6%
Southwest 3.2% 11,000 12.8%
Plains 4,9% 17,000 4.6%
Southeast -3.2% -12,000 3.6%
Total 1.9% 75,000
November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 14
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Data Tells The Story That Genomics Works Even In Small Herds
Jeffrey Bewley, PhD Holstein Association Analytics and Innovation Scientist
W
hen genomic evaluations were first released, I
was admittedly a bit skeptical. However, over
the years, working with multiple herds, I have
become a big believer in the value of genomic testing of
dairy females. What has convinced me is looking at real
performance data from real herds.
The Western Kentucky University Dairy has participated in
the KDDC Milk 4.0 program and already reaped the benefits of
the genomic testing option of Milk 4.0. All animals in the herd
are now genomic tested.
Those who are skeptical of genomic testing may say that
this concept only works in larger herds. Or, they may say
that genetics doesn’t matter as long as I feed and care for my
animals well. Of course, nutrition, cow comfort, cow care,
reproduction, forage quality, and other management factors all
impact animal performance and profitability. But, genetics is an
important part of that formula also.
Out of curiosity, I wanted to see how the genomic predictions
for key traits affected animal performance within the Western
Kentucky University Dairy herd which is a small (55 milking
cows) herd. Before I did this, I was a little nervous if I would
see the differences that we see in larger herds. After looking
at the data, though, I had no reason to be nervous. The results
were striking.
For each of the analyses in the following graphs, I divided
the herd into categories with equal numbers of animals in each
category based on their genomically-derived PTA (Predicted
Transmitting Ability) for each trait. The numbers above the bars
are the actual performance averages for each group.
In the first graph, the comparison is between PTA Milk
and 305 day ME (Mature Equivalent) milk. The average ME
milk for the top 25% of animals in the herd for PTA Milk was
27,523. The average ME milk for the bottom 25% of animals
in the herd for PTA Milk was 23,105. This is a difference of
4,418 pounds between the top genetics for milk and the bottom
genetics for milk. Wow! That’s a huge difference. Keep
in mind that these animals all live in the same pen, are fed
the same TMR, experience the same weather, and the same
management. Now, imagine what could happen if we selected
out the lowest animals in the herd (which we have been doing
slowly). We automatically increase the production average of
the herd without changing anything in the environment or feed.
After that analysis, I wondered if we would see similar results
looking at actual milk rather than ME (which is a calculated
number) milk. The following graph compares PTA Milk to 1st
lactation 305-day milk for 1st lactation cows only. We can’t
compare animals across lactations because older cows naturally
milk more. The results from this comparison were even more
dramatic than the first one. The average 305-day milk for the
top 25% of 1st lactation cows in the herd for PTA Milk was
22,452. The average 305-day milk for the bottom 25% of cows
in the herd for PTA Milk was 17,685. This is a difference of
4,767 pounds between the top genetics for milk and the bottom
genetics for milk. At a milk price of $18/cwt, this represented
increased revenue of $858 per 1st lactation cow. This difference
will be even larger as these cows mature.
Of course, milk production isn’t the whole story of genetic
selection. We also want to breed healthy, fertile cows with the
physical conformation to have long, productive lives. With that
in mind, we compared a few additional traits.
November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 15
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In the following graph, cows are divided into three categories
for PTA SCS (Somatic Cell Score): PTA SCS >3, PTA SCS=3,
and PTA SCS<3. A lower PTA SCS is desired for this trait.
The lactation average SCC for the worst group for PTA SCS
was 142,515 cells/mL. The lactation average SCC for the best
group for PTA SCS was 49,175 cells/mL. This represents a
93,140 difference in actual SCC. The cows that were supposed
to be more resistant to mastitis were indeed more resistant.
Practically, this is a huge difference in SCC. Imagine the
impact that selecting for lower SCC can have on your bulk tank
SCC.
The next comparison was for fertility. Daughter pregnancy
rate is defined as the percentage of nonpregnant cows that
become pregnant during each 21-day period. It’s a great
indicator of fertility. This trait is particularly important in
our hot, humid climate where reproduction can be more of a
challenge. For this analysis, the cows were divided into the top
and bottom 50% of the herd for daughter pregnancy rate. The
cows in the top 50% for daughter pregnancy rate averaged 98
days open. The cows in the bottom 50% for daughter pregnancy
rate averaged 114 days open. Assuming a cost per day open of
$3 per day, this is $48 per cow per lactation difference.
The final comparison was for PTA Type compared to Final
Classification Score. PTA Type represents the overall physical
conformation (feet and legs, udder, body traits) of the cow.
Final Classification Score is provided by an independent
appraiser representing how close the animal is to the ideal
for her breed. 100 points would be a perfect cow. The top
25% of the herd for PTA Type averaged 82.5 points for final
classification score. The bottom 25% of the herd for PTA Type
averaged 77.8 points for final classification score. This is a
difference in 4.7 points for final classification score. This result
shows that the animals that were supposed to be closer to the
ideal Holstein genetically actually scored better.
I am still amazed by these results. For each trait, the genetic
prediction from genomic testing reflected actual within herd
differences. This science really works. How can we use it? In
the short term, we are using this information to cull the lower-
end animals. The top animals are candidates for sexed semen.
The bottom animals are now receiving beef semen. We are now
testing all calves at birth. Heifers with poor genetics are culled
before we spend money raising them only to see that their
performance won’t be up to our new standards. In each case,
we aren’t looking at individual traits by themselves. We select
based on a selection index like Net Merit, TPI, JPI, or DWP that
combines all traits into one formula. We want balanced cows
that milk well, have less risk for disease, breed back quickly,
last for multiple lactations, and look good. Genomic testing
has already helped us increase production levels and select for
healthier, longer living animals. But, we have just scratched the
surface of these benefits.
The KDDC Milk 4.0 program provides Kentucky dairy
producers an opportunity to improve their herds through the use
of genomic testing of females. You have the chance to use this
technology at a lower price than anyone in the country! It’s an
exciting opportunity.
November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 16
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P
reweaned calves in the first three weeks of life
receive essentially all of their nutrients in liquid form.
They also are the dairy animals most susceptible to
cold stress because of their high surface-area-to-body-
mass ratio.
When the mercury drops, those calves expend more energy
to maintain their body temperature. That draws nutrients away
from immune function and growth. So it’s up to us to support
those winter babies with added nutrients to keep them healthy
and growing through frigid conditions.
University of Illinois dairy researchers Sarah Morrison and
Phil Cardoso addressed winter calf feeding in an issue of the
Dairy Focus at Illinois newsletter. They noted a rule of thumb
for energy needs of young calves is that for every 1˚F decrease
in ambient temperature below 50˚F, a 1% increase in energy is
required. Suggested ways to accomplish this are:
1. Feed higher amounts of milk or milk replacer – Adding
a third daily feeding may be required to accomplish this.
2. Change liquid ration formulation – Increasing the
nutrient density (up to no more than 16% solids) can pack more
energy into every bottle or pail. Many milk replacer companies
sell “winter blend” products that accomplish this, or a herd
nutritionist can advise how to safely adjust the liquid-to-powder
ratio. If feeding pasteurized whole milk, balancer powders can
be added to achieve the same goal.
3. Increase starter-grain intake – This strategy will not
work for the youngest calves under three weeks of age, but
research has shown that older calves can compensate for higher
nutrition demands in cold conditions by eating more starter. It is
imperative that calves have access to fresh water to effectively
employ this strategy.
Ohio State University Professor and Extension Dairy
Specialist Maurice Eastridge noted in a DairExnet Bulletin that
a combination of these strategies also can be used. He said the
ultimate nutrition target should be small-breed calves three
weeks of age or less consuming 1.3 pounds of dry matter (DM)
per day, and large-breed calves consuming 2.0 pounds DM
daily. [Milk replacer is approximately 95% DM and whole milk
is 13% DM.]. Fat targets should be 0.3 pounds of daily fat for
small breeds, and 0.5 pounds for large-breed calves.
Both the Illinois and Michigan State researchers noted
important housing measures that can help calves maintain
body heat and preserve nutrients. “Bedding for young calves
is very important, because they lie down more than 18 hours
a day,” said Cardoso. Deep, dry straw is considered the gold
standard for calf bedding, as it allows the animals to “nest” and
create stable air pockets free from draft. Wet bedding should be
strenuously avoided, as it will produce 60% greater heat loss
than dry bedding.
Eastridge advised positioning calf hutches to ensure the
prevailing wind is not blowing into the front of the hutch. A
windbreak upwind of hutches will protect the area and reduce
wind chill on calves. Clean, dry calf jackets also can help
preserve body heat in the youngest animals.
Overall, Eastridge said supporting preweaned calves in winter
comes down to two basic elements: “Make sure calves have
adequate nutrition to support their maintenance needs and still
be able to grow; and make sure their housing conditions are
not increasing their maintenance needs with drafts and wet
bedding.”
Time to Ramp up Calf Nutrients for Winter
Maureen Hanson Dairy Herd Management
November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 17
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P
reg Rate: The percentage of cows eligible to
become pregnant that are reported pregnant within
a specific period of time. It is a measure of how well
and how quickly cows have conceived and it accounts for
both heat detection and conception rate.
The assessment begins at the end of the VWP after calving
and evaluates each 21-day period for eligible cows to determine
the percent of cows that became pregnant. Every21-day period
for a cow that lapses without a pregnancy reduces the herd’s
Pregnancy Rate. Features you
can control to help ensure pregnancy rates on the DHI-202 are
as accurate as possible include:
To get preg rate calculated you have to report an approximate
number of days to preg check cows on the DHI Option 62. If
marked N for this option, no preg rate will be calculated no
matter what other info is reported.
On the DHI-202 in the Remarks box there are often notes
about reporting preg data. Some of the message include:
COWS BRED BUT NOT DIAG. PREG (option 62=Y): you
must report pregnancy results. Your pregnancy rate will be
deflated if the program does not have pregnancy status.
COWS BRED SINCE (option 62=N): the program will use
non-return to identify pregnant cows.
To change how the program uses reproductive data, discuss
option 62 with your DHI technician. Regardless of the option
you choose, you cannot compare pregnancy rates from the
DHI-202 with pregnancy rates from PCDART or other on-farm
systems unless you record all pregnancies ASAP after breeding.
So to get accurate preg rates, these are the essential steps:
1. Enter approx. number of days you expect to preg check
cows after breeding in DHI Option 62. Up to 99 days. Herds
with N for this option will not have a preg rate calculated.
2. Be sure the Voluntary Waiting Period 'VWP' you have
reported to DHIA is correct. Cows bred even just one day before
VWP are not included in preg rate calculations at all. So, if
anything go just a little long on the VWP.
3. Report Do Not Breed Cows with repro code C. After
reported C, any repro event, even a heat adds them back into the
eligible breeding herd and calculations for preg rate.
4. Report all preg diagnosis info in a timely manner. Use
actual date of pregnancy diagnosis, not test day. If no diagnosis
date is reported to Mid-South, the date of test will be used for
the diagnosis date.
5. Schedule test day and herd repro work so your data is
current on test day. If you want it to be most correct, don't test
on Monday and do herd health on Tuesday. Do it the other way
around.
For the herds that have indicated they will be reporting pregs
based on option 62 but who do not report preg data no preg rate
will be calculated.
Questions about preg rate? Ask your DHIA Technician or
your KDDC consultant.
Understanding Preg Rate
Mark Witherspoon
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November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 18
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Wildcat Wisdom
Donna Amaral-Phillips
UK Dairy Extension Group
How Do You Define the Role of Your
Nutritional Consultant?
I
n my career, I have had the opportunity to participate
in numerous youth educational events. I greatly enjoy
seeing these future agricultural leaders and industry
advocates wanting to learn about the science behind how
we manage and care for animals, not just dairy cattle.
Understanding the application of these concepts has
always been a passion of mine, the reason I went on to
Graduate School and have the job I do today. At these
youth educational events, I often times have a nutrition-
related station of which the content changes from year
to year. One year, I decided to ask each of the groups
what they thought a nutritionist’s role should be on a
dairy. Not to my surprise, their response centered on
balancing rations alone. This was the response from more
than one group of youth on this day. Yes, nutritionists are
actively involved in providing balanced rations, but their
role can and should extend way beyond just crunching
numbers to get a recipe to feed various groups of heifers
or cows. Today, the role of nutritionists on farms is very
different from those 20 years, even as shortly as 5 years,
ago. So, how would I define a nutritionist’s role and skills
needed on today’s dairy farms?
Skill Needed: Ability to balance rations reflecting current
science and knowledge
To start with, today’s rations are balanced for an optimum
performance while containing feed-related costs to achieve
maximum profit, and not for least cost per se. Both potential
production and reproductive performance along with feed cost
drive farm profitability and need to be considered together when
balancing rations. Rations also need to provide the best chances
for maintaining an animal’s health and well-being, as well as
being environmentally friendly.
To bring all of these aspects together in one package or ration,
the nutritionist needs a sound understanding of how cows
convert nutrients found in feeds into milk and meat. Science
in this area has accelerated greatly in recent years. Researchers
are looking more at the mechanisms or the how’s behind
why certain products, i.e. additives, or nutrients work and the
impacts they have within the rumen or the cow herself. To
understand and apply findings from this generation of research,
one needs a science foundation to build upon (often in the form
of advanced physiology, nutrition, and biochemistry classes) and
they need to participate in continuing education opportunities
to understand and apply these advances. This understanding
is needed to not only balance rations for today’s industry and
cows, but as importantly, to explain the merits of changes in
suggested ration formulations, especially when they carry higher
initial costs. Recent examples can include the use of ruminal-
protected methionine in pre-fresh cows or the impact of certain
fat supplements (specifically, certain fatty acids) on milk yield
and components. Probably the best examples are the upcoming
nutrition refinements associated with protein (specifically amino
acids- the building blocks for protein) for lactating cows and in
the requirements for calves and heifers.
Skill Needed: Nutritionists are management consultants,
not just “Ration Balancers”
Sound nutrition programs are a result of the effective
integration and application of not only nutritionally-related
concepts, but also those associated with other “cow”
management, agronomic, and economic aspects important to
a dairy’s profitability and survival. Sometimes I am amazed
by an assumption by some, including trained nutritionists, that
nutritionists can only “do nutrition”. We possess the skills and
training to understand the science behind concepts regardless of
the discipline and have a unique skill set to apply and integrate
various disciplines on farm. This understanding and ability to
integrate various management aspects is important to achieve
the expected results from properly designed feeding programs.
Often times, nutritionists are the first person to detect an issue
while it is developing and before it becomes a total disaster.
This developing issue may not be directly related to the feeding
program, but other aspects, such as reproduction or mastitis
prevention. For example, nutritionists understand the important
components associated with a reproductive program as breeding
issues can easily derail any best designed and implemented
feeding program. Cow comfort, be it stall maintenance,
stocking density, or heat abatement, impact feed intake and
rumination times. Nutritionists can be a sounding board as you
consider changes in your operation’s cropping or management
system or changes needed from an environmental standpoint.
Additional aspects associated with environmental management
are coming quickly and will need to be considered in feeding
and overall management programs.
Skill Needed: Ability to maintain and expand a
professional relationship
Many different combinations of feedstuffs and management
practices can be incorporated into profitable feeding and
management programs. A two-way dialog between a dairy
manager and nutritionist sets the stage for this process and
can be the difference between designing a profitable feeding
program and overall operation and one that is not. Your
November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 19
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund
nutritionist needs to understand your goals for your operation
and on a routine basis discuss these goals with you, not just
at the time of “getting your business”. On a routine basis,
at least quarterly, they need to be able to explain to you why
changes or certain components are part or should be part of
your management program. Ration balancing is an on-going
process, not one that is completed once yearly after fall crops
are harvested. Tweaking a management program should occur
in small steps, but is something which must be continuously
explored. Dairy managers, in turn, need to understand why
changes are needed, how to implement these changes, and
continually ask questions of their nutritionist. A true dialog
between all parties is important and do not forget to include
others directly impacted by these discussions, such as family
members or on-farm feed people.
Probably, one of the hardest realizations is the fact that this
is a professional, business relationship first and foremost, not
based on a friendship or feeling that either party “owes” the
other something. You may develop a friendship and share
common interests outside of the dairy operation. But, this is
separate from the business component of your relationship.
Sometimes your nutritionist, or any consultant for that matter,
needs to be honest with you and tell you something that you
do not want to hear. Yes, this conversation may “hurt” your
feelings, get you upset, and get you to contemplate “firing”
this consultant. However, later you might come to realize that
they had your best interest at heart and really were doing you
a favor. The key part here is they want to help you understand
how to correct the detected issue and work through steps needed
to correct the identified issue. Basically, they want to help you
with a solution.
Skill Needed: What skill set do they offer- those of a
nutritionist or a feed person?
The skill set of a “feed person” is very different than those of
a nutritionist, in my opinion. A feed person serves an important
role in the feeding program, but one very different than a
nutritionist. A feed person, very often, is sent to collect forage
samples as needed, makes “social calls” to make sure managers
are happy with services provided, recruits new clients for the
business, and collects payments, when needed, to name just a
few of this person’s possible responsibilities. Often times, the
feed person does not have background to understand how cows
use various nutrients and does not have the responsibility of
balancing rations.
In contrast, a nutritionist has some form of formal training in
nutrition and physiology, continually participates in professional
training opportunities for scientific updates, and is able to apply
these concepts in the development of feeding and management
programs on farm. Today’s ration balancing programs
require one to have a sound understanding of what occurs
in a cow’s rumen and in the cow herself. These computer
programs calculate the amount and concentration of over 50
nutritionally-related nutrients and fractions, much different
than older generation programs calculating just protein and
energy concentrations. Nutritionists also should on a routine
basis review management records to detect potential issues
early, walk through the cows to “listen to the cows themselves”,
and interact with the feed person, other employees and dairy
manager as well to learn what is occurring on farm.
One question I often get is, do you know a nutritionist that is
not selling something that I can hire? One first needs to realize
that all nutritionists form personal opinions of what products,
ingredients, and nutrient specs work best on farms, irrespective
of whom pays their salary. This is just human nature. The
difference comes in how they form these opinions and how
they modified or update them over time. Are their opinions
regarding a product or ingredient based on their company’s
or personal profit margin or have they seen research that
supports that said product/ingredient can deliver the intended
benefit? I think you would agree that both sides of this coin
exist in nutritionists serving the US Dairy Industry. The key
here is to ask questions that allow one to determine if the
selected products/ingredients are the best match for providing
an optimum feeding program for your cows and if this person/
nutritionist possesses the skills to help you, the dairy manager,
better manage your cows’ profitability. This answer will not
be the same for everyone. Just make sure what skills you are
wanting, those associated with a feed person or a nutritionist,
and use these people accordingly.
Bottom Line:
Nutritionists are a professional whom plays a very important
role in helping you implement and manage sound feeding and
management programs. They are trained to understand how
cows make milk and how to make the best of this biological
system for your operation’s potential profitability. They offer a
skill set that goes beyond those associated just with balancing
rations. As dairy managers, your job is to make the best use of
their skill set in your dairy business.
November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 20
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund
Brown Swiss Junior show
Component Merit Cow
Fairdale Total Cali-ET Emily Goode, Liberty KY
State Herd Award
Kentucky Brown Swiss, Glasgow KY
Junior Showmanship
1st Hudson Spoonamore, Stanford KY
2nd Hadley Spoonamore, Stanford KY
Brown Swiss Open show
Senior Champion Female and Reserve Grand Champion
Fairdale Total Cali-ET Emily Goode, Liberty KY
NASCO Award
Pine Tree Rich Alli 7462 ET Fairdale Farm LLC, Worthville, KY
Guernsey
Junior Showmanship
1st Cade Huffman, Summer Shade KY
Jersey
Lifetime Cheese Production Class
1st Hirds Colton Dream Keightley Core and Borba, Salvisa KY
GJPI Grand Champion
Hirds Colton Dream Keightley Core and Borba, Salvisa KY
Brown Swiss Junior show
Component Merit Cow
Fairdale Total Cali-ET Emily Goode, Liberty KY
State Herd Award
Kentucky Brown Swiss, Glasgow KY
Congratulations To The Kentucky 2021 North American
International Livestock Exposition Champions
November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 21
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund
GJPI Cow Recognition Awards
Hirds Colton Dream Keightley Core and Borba, Salvisa KY
Senior Champion Female
Hirds Colton Dream Keightley Core and Borba, Salvisa KY
Grand Champion Female
Hirds Colton Dream Keightley Core and Borba, Salvisa KY
Premier Performance Cow
Hirds Colton Dream Keightley Core and Borba, Salvisa KY
Reserve Open Supreme Dairy Cow
Hirds Colton Dream Keightley Core and Borba, Salvisa KY
Milking Shorthorn
Junior Showmanship
1st Sophie Franklin, Waddy KY
Reserve Intermediate Champion Female
Hard Core KY-Blue Abigail EXP, Taylor Graves, Danville KY
Red & White
Reserve Intermediate Senior Champion Female
Golden-oaks Topprize-Red-Et, Emily & Leann Goode, Liberty KY
Reserve Junior Champion Female
MS-AOL Recharge-Red_ET, Hadley Olt/Hallie Griffiths,
Greensburg Ky
Reserve Grand Champion Female
Golden-oaks Topprize-Red-Et, Emily & Leann Goode, Liberty KY
State Herd Award
1st Kentucky Open Red & White, Greensburg KY
November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 22
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund
Tennessee Titans and The Dairy Alliance Award $10,000
Grant to Warren County Public Schools
The Dairy Alliance and the Tennessee Titans awarded
Warren County Public Schools through the Fuel Up to Play
60 Hometown Grant. A check presentation of $10,000 and
celebration were held at Henry F. Moss Middle School in
late October. Tennessee Titans’ mascot T-Rac, former Titans’
linebacker Gerald McRath and Olympic foil fencer Lee Kiefer
took part in the day’s festivities, as did local dairy farmer Carl
Chaney of Chaney’s Dairy Barn.
The NFL, through Fuel Up to Play 60, provides $10,000 in
each NFL club market in grant money annually. The Hometown
Grant provides deserving schools with funding to facilitate
sustainable physical activity and healthy eating programs for
students. The Hometown Grant awarded is the first one given to
a Kentucky school district. The funds will be used to promote
healthy eating and physical activity at three Warren County
middle schools: Drakes Creek, Henry F. Moss and South Warren
Middle School. The schools will purchase physical education
equipment and smoothie bikes, as well as add smoothies to
the cafeteria’s breakfast menu. The blenders in the smoothie
bikes are powered by students’ pedaling, an interactive way for
students to learn about real milk’s nutrition and fun ways to
exercise.
Between the equipment obtained from the grant and the
celebration featuring successful athletes, students will remember
the importance of choosing dairy products at mealtimes
Dairy Training Teaches Farm Gate to Plate to Kentucky
Nutrition Professionals in Academia
The Dairy Alliance hosted a virtual communications
training in October to educate nutrition professionals about
dairy. The training, Debunking Milk Myths: From the Farm
Gate to MyPlate, included professors and dietetic internship
directors in nutritional science departments from universities
across the southeast. These individuals are teaching future
nutrition students and policymakers, making it vital that they
can successfully communicate facts about dairy farming, dairy
sustainability and dairy nutrition. Attending from Kentucky
were two Murray State University employees: Nutrition
Program Director and Assistant Professor Lauren Roberson,
Ph.D., MS, RD, LD, and Dietetic Internship Director and
Assistant Professor Nichole Haynes, MS, RD, LDN.
New York dairy farmer and Registered Dietitian Abbey
Copenhaver presented “Farming with RDNs: What Nutrition
Professionals Need to Know about Agriculture” before
communications trainer Teri Goudie taught participants how
to answer questions students and consumers have on nutrition,
food and agriculture. By the end of the training, attendees had
learned not only dairy’s story, but how to best share that story
with others through their academic roles
November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 23
KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund
Allied Sponsors
PLATINUM
Alltech
Bel Cheese
Bluegrass Dairy & Food
Burkmann Feeds
Cowherd Equipment
CPC Commodities
Kentucky Department of Agriculture
Kentucky Farm Bureau
Kentucky Soybean Board
Prairie Farms
Shaker Equipment Sales
Zoetis
GOLD
DFA
Givens & Houchins Inc.
KAEB Services
Mid-South Dairy Records
Owen Transport
Select Sires Mid-America
SILVER
Day and Day Feed
Givens & Houchins Inc.
Grain Processing Corporation
Kentucky Veterinary Medical Association
Luttrull Feed
Nutra Blend
South Central Bank
Southland Dairy Farmers
BRONZE
AgCentral
Agri Feed International, LLC
Bagdad Rolling Mills
Bank of Jamestown
Central Farmers Supply
Hartland Animal Hospital
Kentucky Corn Growers Association
Limestone & Cooper
Mammoth Cave Dairy Auction
QMI Quality Mgt Inc.
Nutra Blend
Smith Creek Inc
Wilson Trucking
Special Thanks to Our Sponsors
176 Pasadena Drive
Lexington, KY 40503
859.516.1129 ph
www.kydairy.org
Non-Profit
US Postage
PAID
JAN 11 Value-Added Food Safety Workshop, WKU, Bowling Green
JAN 17-19 Georgia Dairy Conference, Savannah, GA
FEB 22 KDDC Young Producer Conference & Trade Show, Sloan Convention Center, Bowling Green
FEB 22 Dairy Awards Banquet, 6:30pm Sloan Convention Center, Bowling Green
FEB 23 Kentucky Dairy Partners Conference & Trade Show, Sloan Convention Center, Bowling Green
Calendar of Events

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KY Milk Matters November/December 2021

  • 1. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 1 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Milk Matters N o v e m b e r - D e c e m b e r w w w. k y d a i r y. o r g K E N T U C K Y Supported by Commissioner Praises Contributions of Female Farmers Ahead of Kentucky Women in Agriculture Day page 5 Kentucky Dairy Partners Annual Meeting page 8-10 Data Tells The Story That Genomics Works Even In Small Herds page 14 Chaney’s Milk Now Sold in 41 Kroger Stores Across Kentucky and Indiana A win for dairy in Kentucky as Chaney’s welcomes Fishmarket and Kroger into its family of retail partners. In the making since they started bottling milk back in June of 2019, Chaney’s is incredibly excited to finally see their efforts come to fruition. “We are so pleased a Kentucky Proud milk product will be available in Kroger stores across the commonwealth,” Kentucky Commissioner of Agriculture Dr. Ryan Quarles said. Fishmarket and Kroger have proven time and time again their commitment to supporting local farmers and purchasing local products. Elizabeth Lunsford, owner of J.R. Chaney Bottling Company fulfilled the family dream of bottling the milk from the jersey cows on their fifth generation family dairy farm back in June of 2019, a project that took almost 2 years to complete. “At day one Houchens jumped on board welcoming us into some of their top performing Crossroads IGA and Houchens stores across the Bowling Green and Glasgow area. We would not be where we are without them.” said Elizabeth Lunsford. “We are just so appreciative of their faith in us from day one. We are now in around 25 of their stores across the area” As a result of a Kentucky Proud local food meeting put on by the Kentucky Department of Agriculture back in 2019, the Chaney family was connected with Steve Smith with FishMarket and Eric Hilton with Kroger. Over time they stayed in touch, and as Kroger began to grow its local food offerings, Chaney’s was a product that checked a lot of boxes for them. “I wanted these big accounts at day one” explained Elizabeth. “But now, being two years into this, I am more confident than ever that the product we are bottling is of the upmost quality, giving us time to work through all new equipment hiccups and really dial in our temperatures and processes”. explained Elizabeth. “The growth has been incredibly exciting, and being able to share a product we are so passionate about with so many people across Kentucky, is just such an amazing feeling, and something generations before would be so proud of” “We’re extremely excited to work with Kroger,” fourth- generation farmer Carl Chaney said. “This new venture not only allows our farm to remain sustainable for future generations, but brings our quality milk to new customers. Our milk comes from 100 percent Jersey cows. It’s high quality milk. It just tastes different.” The Chaney family has hopes that being able to help put a face to their milk, not only helps with growth of their product, but also provides an advantage to the entire dairy industry. Kroger is offering Chaney’s whole, chocolate, 2% and half and half in various sizes. The whole and chocolate milk are a true whole product and are not standardized. The Chaney family feels that in addition to being all jersey milk, this is another key differentiator for them. The Chaney family expresses sincere gratitude to all individuals who have supported them along this journey. To learn more about Kroger and other retail partners of Chaney’s milk, please visit https://www.chaneysdairybarn.com/ where-can-i-buy-it.
  • 2. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 2 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund 2021 KDDC Board of Directors & Staff Executive Committee President: Freeman Brundige Vice President: Charles Townsend, DVM Sec./Treasurer: Tom Hastings EC Member: Greg Goode EC Past President: Richard Sparrow Board of Directors District 1: Freeman Brundige 731.446.6248 District 2: Josh Duvall 270.535.6533 District 3: Keith Long 270.670.1388 District 4: Bill Crist Jr. 270.590.3185 District 5: Tony Compton 270.378.0525 District 6: Mark Williams 270.427.0796 District 7: Greg Goode 606.303.2150 District 8: Steve Weaver 270.475.3154 District 9: Jerry Gentry 606.875.2526 District 10: Terry Rowlette 502.376.2292 District 11: Stewart Jones 270.402.4805 District 12: John Kuegel 270.316.0351 Equipment: Tony Cowherd 270.469.0398 Milk Haulers: Mike Owen 270.392.1902 Genetics: Dan Johnson 502.905.8221 Feed: Tom Hastings 270.748.9652 Nutrition: Elizabeth Lunsford Alltech 859.553.0072 Dairy Co-op: Stephen Broyles 859.421.9801 Veterinary: Dr. Charles Townsend 270.726.4041 Finance: Todd Lockett 270.590.9375 Heifer Raiser: Bill Mattingly 270.699.1701 Former Pres.: Richard Sparrow 502.370.6730 Employee & Consultants Executive Director: H.H. Barlow 859.516.1129 kddc@kydairy.org DC-Central: Beth Cox PO Box 144, Mannsville, KY 42758 bethcoxkddc@gmail.com 859.516.1619 • 270-469-4278 DC-Western: Dave Roberts 1334 Carrville Road, Hampton, KY 42047 roberts@kydairy.org 859.516.1409 DC-Northern: Jennifer Hickerson PO Box 293, Flemingsburg, KY 41041 j.hickersonkddc@gmail.com 859.516.2458 KDDC 176 Pasadena Drive • Lexington, KY 40503 www.kydairy.org KY Milk Matters produced by Carey Brown President’s Corner Freeman Brundige N othing raises my spirits and reaffirms my love of the dairy business like seeing the most beautiful cows in the world and the great people who bred them and/or take care of them. I have been fortunate enough to get to attend the Ky State Fair this summer, and the World Dairy Expo and the North American Dairy Show this fall. I am very proud that the NAILE had large increases in entries in almost all breeds. Seems like these days, even though some of us are still showing, the seniors among us congregate and tell tall tales about shows and cows remembered years and even several decades ago. What wonderful times to relive. No one ever says I wish I had never started doing this. And we all realize that the friendships we have made, many from far away farms, are more important than how the cows placed years ago. I know I have been down this road before, but I still hope in this day of larger and larger dairies that there can remain a personal attachment to the cow. The creator of our whole industry! We still are facing lots of challenges in our ability to have a profitable business. KDDC is trying to work on different fronts to help influence the decisions being made to be of the best interest of both our Kentucky farmers and our neighbors in the other Southeast states. Hopefully, some of the needed assistance will be available during this holiday season. Maybe we can all find a little time to be thankful for the good things that we still enjoy in this high-pressure business. I do think there are some trends and programs that could give us some better days ahead. More and more people are starting to understand the situation we are and have been in concerning our pricing and marketing problems
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  • 4. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 4 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Executive Director Comments H H Barlow T he holiday season is upon us. Thanksgiving has been celebrated many ways in my life. I remember as a boy, my mother would make a big pot of tomato soup and a tray of peanut butter and crackers that we would eat in the tobacco stripping room. Dad and Mom, my two older sisters and me. Dad loved Thanksgiving break because he knew we would get a lot of tobacco stripped those three days we were out of school. I wasn’t happy about spending Thanksgiving that way but looking back, we were together with no TV, no cell phone, and we talked… something that is too easily lost today. Obviously, our family Thanksgiving evolved from the tobacco barn to, now, one of our big family events…Enjoying a large meal together and playing in our own Turkey Bowl…a Barlow football game full of fun, except for the occasional tiff among our competitive boys. But it’s all about family, togetherness and having fun. Just think about it, the freedom, and the beauty of where we live, the abundant food for our tables and the gathering of loved ones. We are blessed beyond measure, so let’s pause, reflect, and thank God for our lives and blessings. During Thanksgiving and Christmas, let’s think about what binds us dairymen all together…It’s our COWS, the one thing we all have in common, regardless of our farm size or diversity of operations and equipment. The cows are the constant. What is it about those cows that we build our lives around them? These gentle giants with their big eyes and wet noses that are 100% dependent upon us for their existence. They cause us a tremendous amount of labor. They are very expensive to feed, house and milk 365 days a year with no holidays. However, they reward us with their production and provide us the income we need to live. It’s definitely a synergistic relationship…We take care of them, and they reward us. People ask me often, “Why do you continue to milk cows?” I quickly answer, they are my therapy, walking among them, having them rub up against me or even nudge me for a good scratch or rub without a word or complaint. I know being a dairy farmer is an extremely tough business, but I hope, during these holidays, you can look at your cows as a gift. Thank you, God, for the opportunity to work with and shepherd these wonderful animals. My last several newsletters have been pretty challenging to report. Now, good news for most anyone in the dairy business. I believe we are headed into a season with a more positive outlook. Milk prices today and futures prices both look much higher than we experienced for much of 2021. There are many factors contributing to this encouraging outlook that should give us a sustained period of better prices, hopefully for the next six months. Demand for milk products is robust and exports are higher than ever. Milk production across the world is down. Europe and Oceania are producing much less than last year. In the Netherlands, environmentalists are demanding they cut their milking herd by 25%. This crazy mentality could spread throughout Europe. In America we must prepare to resist these flawed ideas that it will significantly help the environment. And do they not understand the need for food and what a valuable food source milk is especially in protein and calcium. Not only is production down overseas, but the milking herd in the US is down by over 100,000 cows since last summer. Milk production in October was .5% less than a year ago. All Class III and Class IV futures prices are over $19 for every month in 2021. Things can change quickly, but I believe the future looks much brighter. Of course, input costs continue to rise, especially feed, labor, fuel and crop costs. Good management of the entire farming operation will be more critical than ever to secure a sustainable profit. KDDC’s new MILK 4.0 program has several tools that can help you navigate these higher input costs. Please contact your consultant to get signed up. There are financial awards available if you are on DHIA and can show improvement in your pregnancy rate and somatic cell count over the last 12 months. Don’t forget our genomic testing program. MILK 4.0 will provide the testing for around $13/sample. This tool can accurately identify your top animals needed to breed for replacements, as well as identifying animals which can be bred to beef sires for a more valuable crossbred calf. I’m happy to announce the hiring of Patty Holbert from Larue County as our new dairy consultant for the central region. She has a lifetime in the dairy industry with many roles from owning her own dairy herd to being a consultant for a national dairy company. We miss Meredith Scales, but I think Patty is a worthy new employee, ready to advance our dairy farmer’s success. I started my comments with stories of my Thanksgiving experiences. I’m closing my comments by asking each of us to focus on the Christmas season and the real reason for Christmas. Christmas trees are beautiful, giving and receiving gifts are very exciting and getting together with families and friends is wonderful, but we must never forget the true reason for our celebrating. There are troubles all around our country and there is only one answer to the destruction, polarization and discontent that appears everywhere…That ANSWER is the LOVE of Jesus Christ. Please join me in serious prayer for our country, our friends and enemies and petition God to heal our land. God bless each and every one of you this Christmas and raise a glass of egg nog and custard to celebrate the birth of Jesus Christ.
  • 5. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 5 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Commissioner Praises Contributions of Female Farmers Ahead of Kentucky Women in Agriculture Day NUMBER OF FEMALE FARMERS ROSE IN 2017 USDA AG CENSUS R ecognizing the importance of women in Kentucky’s farming sector, Commissioner of Agriculture Dr. Ryan Quarles spoke at the annual Kentucky Women in Agriculture (KIWA) annual conference in Lexington, a day before the state officially celebrated “Kentucky Women in Agriculture Day,” on Tuesday, October 19. “Anytime women find a seat at the table in any profession, it’s a win,” Commissioner Quarles said. “That follows true in agriculture, as well. Recent survey data has shown women make up nearly 40 percent of our producers. I was happy to join Kentucky Women in Ag today to help celebrate the contribution our female producers have to our farm economy.” KWIA’s membership is comprised of women who own and operate farms and agribusinesses, as well as agriculture entrepreneurs, state and federal personnel, ag educators and students, and consumers. The annual conference provides attendees with the opportunity to network and nurture a recognized agriculture and agribusiness community. By empowering women through education, involvement, and action, KIWA has a positive influence on Kentucky agriculture. That influence is important, as the number of female farmers in Kentucky keeps growing. In 2017, 42,946 women farmed in Kentucky, up 36.7 percent from the number identified in the previous 2012 U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) census. Of those, 33,550 were involved in making day-to-day decisions on the farm, 26,215 were the principal producers on their farms, and 12,648 listed farming as their primary occupation, the census found. The Census of Agriculture is a complete count of U.S. farms and ranches and the people who operate them. Even small plots of land - whether rural or urban - growing fruit, vegetables or some food animals. The Census of Agriculture, taken only once every five years, looks at land use and ownership, operator characteristics, production practices, income and expenditures. USDA will start collecting information for the next census in 2022.
  • 6. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 6 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund On-Farm Grain Storage: A Game-Changer for Many Producers Farmers see many advantages to storing their grain crops at home Kentucky Farm Bureau A s Hurricane Ida made landfall near the mouth of the Mississippi, no one could predict the damage it would cause including stopping most river traffic. And while the flow of barges has somewhat returned to normal, the fear of many farmers was how to get their grain crops on their way to export markets by way of the Mighty Mississippi. Kentucky Farm Bureau Second Vice President Sharon Furches said, while many people don’t realize the importance of the waterways as an essential part of the country’s overall infrastructure, she and husband Tripp, owners and operators of Furches Farms, know all too well if river traffic stops, grain leaving the farm becomes an issue. “We had about 80,000-bushel capacity back in 1992,” she said. “We have strategically added to that over the years and today we have 600,000-bushel storage and the infrastructure to dry and manage those bushels. We have come to depend on the ability to store grain, but still need those grain barges to keep moving.” And while the Furcheses said they didn’t have a crystal ball to look into the future, they saw the multiple advantages such storage facilities would have for their farming operation some time ago. “As the farm grew, we knew we needed more on-farm storage, and that became a big piece of our marketing plan,” she said. “The importance of it really elevated for us in particular years when marketing was kind of a make-or-break thing for the farm.” From purely a marketing standpoint, on-farm grain storage made sense for Furches Farms. “The stars don't always align, but this year we have higher prices in the grain market, and we have good yields at this point in time,” Furches said. “We're hoping that all of that continues, but both of those things together make on-farm storage even more important.” But add a hurricane into the mix and consider the quantity of grain from this area that travels down the Mississippi River, and you’re left with wide-spread impact across the region as barge traffic slowed to a crawl after the August storm came through. While little normalcy has returned to the situation, Furches said there was a period of time when some producers were looking at a very difficult situation when it came to storage for their harvested grain. “Not everyone contracts their crop or grain, and if they don't, the elevators on the river were at a point where they had been forced to limit the grain that they can take, because of the backups caused by the hurricane, only accepting grain that they had under contract,” she said. Even with the situation improving these circumstances serve as an example of just how valuable on-farm grain storage can be. Caldwell County Farm Bureau President Craig Roberts, and owner of Roberts Farms, has been proactive in his efforts to install storage for his grain crops, one of which is white corn. “In 2011, we put in two 55,000-bushel bins and a 10,000-bushel wet tank and a looped system. This year we added a 200,000-bushel bin,” he said. “And having good storage capability has been a game-changer.” Over the years, Roberts has created a network of storage bins in addition to these and plans to add another 10,000-bushel bin for soybeans. For him, having adequate grain storage is as much about economics as it is convenience. “We watch the markets every day and I have already sold corn for the 2022 crop; it’s contracted for December of ‘22, and I’ve already sold some soybeans for the fall of ’22,” he said. “The price was right, and I hated not to, and who knows, we could see seven- or eight-dollar beans next year. I don't think we will, but I can say, "Hey, I've got some sold at $12.” Having the ability to store large amounts of grain has enabled Roberts to be market-savvy not only for sold grain, but also in watching barge freight charges. “The hurricane affected freight prices on barges. But for years, at this time, barge freight has gone up and that cuts the farmer’s dollar on soybeans and corn,” he said. “If you have the storage facility to hold that grain until after the first of the year, and see that those prices have dropped some, it has helped me a lot.” Bill Clift of C&C Ag Enterprises LLC, who constructed the most recent grain bin on the Roberts’ farm as well as the original facility, fully understands how beneficial those bins can be, especially in a year like 2021. He touted timeliness as a key factor that makes on-farm grain storage such an asset, along with increased farmer autonomy and crop quality control. “Granaries are getting tougher and tougher to deliver to during fall harvest. To facilitate harvest, the farmers, including myself, want to be able to store the grain and worry about getting it to market afterwards,” he said. Clift, who has been constructing grain bins for 25 years, has seen an increase in demand for his services building on-farm grain storage facilities.
  • 7. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 7 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund “We built a lot of bins in 2013 and it’s just been a steady climb since then. And we’ve gone from building just basically single grain bins to now there’s people that, they’re wanting to do the whole facility,” he said. Furches looks at grain bins as a necessity as opposed to a luxury. “It's an absolute necessity, and the sizes of these bins can vary depending on whatever is appropriate for an individual farmer,” she said. “We have had people ask us to store grain for them and we just don’t have any extra storage to spare right now. As crops get bigger and dealing with market situations gets harder, you can’t afford to find yourself in a situation where you need storage and don’t have it, not to mention the difficulties Mother Nature can throw at you.” S outhland Dairy Farmers are making it possible for any high school athletic program to refuel athletes with chocolate milk by introducing the “Team Up With Chocolate Milk” program. Our organization has created this grant program to provide up to $2,500 to sports teams for the purchase of chocolate milk for an entire season. Applications are accepted through our website (www. southwestdairyfarmers.com or www.southlanddairyfarmers. com) for each sports season during the outlined time periods. If your program’s application is accepted, your sports program will receive chocolate milk for practices and games and will give students the opportunity to see why chocolate milk is the ultimate recovery beverage. Each school that participates in this program will agree to display signage at sporting events, a visit from the Mobile Dairy Classroom and multiple other requirements that will promote Southland Dairy Farmers and chocolate milk as the ultimate recovery beverage. This program will be available for winter, spring and fall sports with separate application deadlines for each one. The goal is for teams to continue drinking chocolate milk after the grant has come to an end. No matter how you choose to stay active, Chocolate Milk is the original sports drink that can help you stay at your peak. With 13 essential vitamins and nutrients, Chocolate Milk can restore energy and rebuild muscle. It contains an optimal carbohydrate to protein ratio, which is critical for helping refuel tired muscles after strenuous exercise and can enable athletes to exercise at a high intensity during subsequent workouts. And best of all, this nutrient dense recovery drink is all natural. Encourage your local high school sports teams to apply for this nutritional opportunity to try chocolate milk after their workouts. For more information, visit www.southlanddairyfarmers.com. It’s Time To Team Up With Chocolate Milk CLASSIFIED Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plans (CNMPs). Livestock manure management and water quality BMPs. KY Division of Water permitting and compliance. Ben Koostra - Professional Engineer and NRCS Technical Service Provider - Lexington - 859-559- 4662 John Deere 4020 -3 to choose from H S 430 - double beater spreader Several manure spreaders in stock John Deere 5325 - 2 wd drive with loader John Deere 7200- cab -16 speed 5612-Esch High speed Grain Drill Horning Headers - ready to ship! John Deere 3975 - base unit- $$$ save Artex SB 600 Spreader -in stock John Deere 468 - net $14,500 John Deere 566- twine $12,000 Meyer 510 TMR mixers - In STOCK Cloverdale 500 T -TMR mixers - in Stock Stoltzfus 10 ton Litter spreader $30,000 Caterpillar 242B skid loader-$17,500 New Holland 790 choppers-@$7500 John Deere 8200 drills $5850 Gehl 8335 feeder wagon $7500 Patz 290- auger feeder wagon$8500 Artex SB 200- vertical beater- for rental Stoltzfus lime - litter- fert cu 50 $19,500 JD 6400- loader-4wd-open $24,750 Farmco feeder wagons-5 in stock- call John Deere 7405 -4wd -canopy -$24,750 www.redbarnandassociates.com Charlie B. Edgington 859-608-9745
  • 8. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 8 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund SAVE THE DATE FEBRUARY 22-23, 2022 Hybrid Format - In Person and Virtual Sloan Convention Center, 1021 Wilkinson Trace Bowling Green, Kentucky
  • 9. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 9 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund dairy producers PRE REGISTRATION FORM dairy farmers only ON-LINE REGISTRATION IS ALSO AVAILABLE AT KYDAIRY.ORG ATTENDEE 1 ATTENDEE 2 ADDRESS HOME PHONE CELL PHONE EMAIL COUNTY I have a total of cows. • There is a charge of $30 per dairy farm family to attend Feb 22 and/or Feb 23 (LIMIT 4 PER FARM) • There is also a charge of $50 per hotel room night. • Both fees are payable at the conference but please send registration to the address below. I acknowledge $30 charge per dairy farm (one charge for one or two days-not each day) I will attend the YDPC on Tuesday, Feb 22 (full day of meeting.) I will attend Kentucky Dairy Awards Banquet Tuesday evening, Feb 22 I will need a hotel room for Tuesday night, Feb 22. Cost is $50 per room night for a dairy farmer available to qualified young producers (n/c for KDDC board members). I will attend Wednesday, Feb 23 - Kentucky Dairy Partners Meeting and lunch I will attend virtual sessions. All fees payable to KDDC at the conference or online at kydairy.org. Send completed registration to: Eunice Schlappi • 554 Davenport Rd • Harrodsburg, KY 40330 schlappifarms@gmail.com
  • 10. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 10 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund kentucky dairy partners annual meeting Exhibit & Conference Reservation Form February 22-23, 2022 – Sloan Convention Center, Bowling Green, KY REPRESENTATIVE ADDRESS $400 Booth space* (includes booth space and (1) two day registration - all meals incuded) Indicate below if you are a Platinum or Gold KDDC sponsor or if you are government/education group: NAME OF COMPANY EMAIL PHONE ATTENDEE 2 ATTENDEE 1 ATTENDEE 4 ATTENDEE 3 *Platinum KDDC sponsors – free booth space, (1) free two day conference registration *Gold KDDC sponsors - $300 booth space, (1) free two day conference registration *no booth charge for government, educational, etc. (HOWEVER, does not include attendee registrations) $50/person Tuesday - Young Dairy Producers Meeting/banquet (Feb 22) x (number attending) $50/person Wednesday - KDP conference registration (Feb 23) x (number attending) TOTAL ENCLOSED Please make checks payable to: KDDC (KY Dairy Development Council) Kentucky dairy producers will be charged $30 per dairy farm for the two day conference (limit 4 attendees) – separate registration Yes, we would like to provide a door prize ITEM Yes, we would like to provide an item for the silent auction ITEM What type of display do you have? (i.e. full floor, table top, pull ups, other) Is your booth larger than 10 w x 6 d? Do you need electricity? Send completed registration to: Eunice Schlappi • 554 Davenport Rd • Harrodsburg, KY 40330 schlappifarms@gmail.com
  • 11. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 11 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund KDDC and WKU 2022 Milker Trainings K DDC and WKU are currently planning some milker training workshops for early 2022. These workshops will be led by Gretchen Colon Suau. Gretchen is a graduate student in the Agriculture Program at Western Kentucky University. She started her Master’s degree this Fall 2021 in Animal Science with a focus on dairy technologies. She is working with the newly established WKU SmartHolstein Lab. Working with cows is what she loves the most. While she is studying, as part of an Assistantship, she is also working in the WKU Dairy Farm milking cows, feeding calves, and assisting as needed. She's fascinated with topics like cow comfort, cow behavior, animal handling, precision dairy, udder health and pretty much everything cow related. Before coming to WKU, Gretchen did her undergraduate studies in Animal Science in the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez Campus. After graduating, she worked as a Farm Manager for almost 3 years in a Dairy Farm in southwest Puerto Rico. After that experience, for a while, she worked as a Consultant for dairy farmers, giving tools and strategies to improve their farms. After all the experiences gained and while she keeps educating herself, she has realized that helping dairy farmers is one of the things she wants to do most. She wants to contribute to the industry and be an asset as well. Being from Puerto Rico, she knows she can help Spanish-speaking employees that are a big part of the dairy industry. She can be that link to understand the dairy farmers’ needs and the dairy employees’ performance. Reviewing processes and protocols is an important part of communication between these two for consistency and success. During her time at WKU, she hopes to work directly with dairy producers. Dates and locations of workshops will be announced after the new year. Cowherd Equipment & Rental Inc. Cowherd Equipment & Rental, Inc. Cowherd Equipment & Rental, Inc. 1483 Old Summersville Rd. 1483 Old Summersville Rd. Campbellsville, KY 42718 Campbellsville, KY 42718 Office 270-465-2679 Office 270-465-2679 Tony 270-469-0398 Tony 270-469-0398 Vince 270-469-5095 Vince 270-469-5095 Cowherd Equipment & Rental, Inc. For More Information: Cowherd Equipment & Rental, Inc 1483 Old Summersville Rd. Campbellsville, KY 42718 Office 270-465-2679 Tony 270-469-0398 Vince 270-469-5095 Penta 4030 Tire Scraper J&D Head Locks Hagedorn 5440 Manure Spreader Silage Defacer Penta 4930 Cowherd Equipment & Rental, Inc. For More Information: Cowherd Equipment & Rental, Inc. 1483 Old Summersville Rd. Campbellsville, KY 42718 Office 270-465-2679 Tony 270-469-0398 Vince 270-469-5095 Penta 4030 Tire Scraper J&D Head Locks Hagedorn 5440 Manure Spreader Silage Defacer Cow For from h 14 C • Bo Ch • Ch • Bo • J& • IB • Mu Penta 4930 • SC • Up Cowherd Equipm Cowh 14 C Penta 4030 Tire Scra J&D Head Locks Silage Defacer Roto-Mix Mixers Tire Scraper Hoosierland 1450 Penta 4030 J&D Head Locks
  • 12. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 12 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Dixie Dairy Report November 2021 Calvin Covington Class prices. All October federal order class prices were higher than September which means higher blend prices. The October Class I Mover advanced $0.49/cwt., Class II $0.19/ cwt., Class III $1.30/cwt. and Class IV $0.68/cwt. The Class II and IV prices are the highest October prices since 2014. The November Class I Mover, which uses advanced pricing and is based on October dairy product prices, is $17.98/cwt. This is $.98/cwt. higher than October. As the above chart shows, Class IV (butter + powder) has steadily moved higher this year. Going from a low of $13.19/ cwt. in February to $17.04/cwt. in October. Strong exports, lower production in the European Union and New Zealand, lower domestic butter and nonfat dry milk powder (NDM) production, are all lifting the Class IV price. Looking ahead, the Class IV price is projected to exceed the Class III price in the coming months, with a Class IV price between $18.00 - $19.00/ cwt. The CME butter price at the beginning of October was $1.7475/lb. On November 5, butter closed at $1.9350/lb., the highest in almost two years. Strong demand for cream products, higher cheese and lower NDM production which results in less cream for churning, a major butter plant off-line due to a fire, along with seasonal butter demand are, combining, to move butter prices upward. Declining cheese prices will push the Class III price lower in November. Record high cheese production and building inventories (September American cheese inventory over 9% above a year ago) are moving cheese prices lower. At the CME on November 5, blocks were down to $1.5850/lb. and barrels at $1.5025/lb. Blocks and barrels a month ago, were at $1.8500 and $1.7450, respectively. Fluid milk sales. In the three southeastern federal orders, third quarter Class I producer milk volume is mixed. In the Florida order, it is 2.3% higher than the same quarter a year ago. However, in the Southeast order, third quarter Class I producer milk volume is 3.4% and the Appalachian order 5.4% lower than last year. Nationwide, in all federal orders, Class I producer milk is 2.8% lower for the third quarter compared to the same quarter last year. Class I producer milk volume provides a quick and accurate method to track fluid milk sales, plus it is what producers are paid for Milk production. September marks the fourth consecutive month for a lower monthly increase in milk production. According to USDA, September production was only 0.2% higher than last September. USDA also revised August numbers, resulting in August production only 0.6% higher than a year earlier. Fewer cows and less milk produced per cow is slowing 2021 MONTHLY CLASS PRICES
  • 13. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 13 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Milk Prices FMMO 5 www.malouisville.com November 2021 Class 1 Advanced Price (@3.5%BF) $21.38 December 2021 Class 1 Advanced Price (@3.5%BF) $22.57 FMMO 7 www.fmmatlanta.com November 2021 Class 1 Advanced Price (@3.5%BF) $21.78 December 2021 Class 1 Advanced Price (@3.5%BF) $22.97 milk production growth. Each month since May, the nation’s dairy herd has declined. More dairy cows are going to slaughter each month. For the second consecutive month, milk produced per cow was lower than a year earlier. In the 24 milk reporting states, September production was higher in eleven states, and flat or lower in the other thirteen states. South Dakota reported the highest increase (+14.6%), followed by Georgia (+3.8%) and Wisconsin (+3.3%). New Mexico posted the largest milk production decline (-12.5%), followed by Washington (-7.9%) and Florida (-6.8%). The Southeast, as shown below, is the only region of the country reporting a milk production decline for the year-to-date. In the ten Southeast states, only two states show production increases for the first nine months of the year, Georgia +1.1% and North Carolina +2.7%. Blend prices. October blend prices are projected $0.30-$0.40/cwt. higher than September. November blend prices are projected to move up another $0.80-$1.00/ cwt. December blend prices are projected to be the highest for the year, with the Florida blend around $23.00/cwt. and the Appalachian and Southeast orders’ blend close to $21.00/cwt. 2022 blend price projections are higher than last month based on improving butter and NDM prices. Currently, I project 2022 blend prices averaging about $1.50-$1.75/cwt. higher than 2021. My forecast is not as optimistic as current futures prices indicate. I see both domestic and export demand a major challenge next year due to inflation, supply chain issues, and China importing less due to their strong inventory levels and economic issues. Plus, strong cheese inventories and production will keep a lid on cheese prices. PROJECTED* BLEND PRICES – Base Zones – SOUTHEASTERN FEDERAL ORDERS MONTH APPALACHIAN FLORIDA SOUTHEAST ($/cwt. at 3.5% butterfat – base zone) AUGUST 2021 $19.24 $21.11 $19.60 SEPTEMBER $19.37 $21.22 $19.70 OCTOBER $19.79 $21.68 $20.02 NOVEMBER $20.80 $22.74 $20.87 DECEMBER $21.20 $23.05 $21.23 JANUARY 2022 $20.94 $22.85 $21.00 *projections in bold REGIONAL CHANGE IN MILK PRODUCTION & COW NUMBERSAND SHARE OF TOTAL MILK PRODUCTION REGION MILK PRODUCTION 2021 VS 2020 SHAREOFTOTALMILK (Percent Change) (Change in number of Dairy Cows) (Percent) Midwest 3.7% 66,000 31.7% California 1.6% -1,000 18.5% Northwest 0.4% -8,000 15.2% Northeast 0.2% -2,000 13.6% Southwest 3.2% 11,000 12.8% Plains 4,9% 17,000 4.6% Southeast -3.2% -12,000 3.6% Total 1.9% 75,000
  • 14. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 14 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Data Tells The Story That Genomics Works Even In Small Herds Jeffrey Bewley, PhD Holstein Association Analytics and Innovation Scientist W hen genomic evaluations were first released, I was admittedly a bit skeptical. However, over the years, working with multiple herds, I have become a big believer in the value of genomic testing of dairy females. What has convinced me is looking at real performance data from real herds. The Western Kentucky University Dairy has participated in the KDDC Milk 4.0 program and already reaped the benefits of the genomic testing option of Milk 4.0. All animals in the herd are now genomic tested. Those who are skeptical of genomic testing may say that this concept only works in larger herds. Or, they may say that genetics doesn’t matter as long as I feed and care for my animals well. Of course, nutrition, cow comfort, cow care, reproduction, forage quality, and other management factors all impact animal performance and profitability. But, genetics is an important part of that formula also. Out of curiosity, I wanted to see how the genomic predictions for key traits affected animal performance within the Western Kentucky University Dairy herd which is a small (55 milking cows) herd. Before I did this, I was a little nervous if I would see the differences that we see in larger herds. After looking at the data, though, I had no reason to be nervous. The results were striking. For each of the analyses in the following graphs, I divided the herd into categories with equal numbers of animals in each category based on their genomically-derived PTA (Predicted Transmitting Ability) for each trait. The numbers above the bars are the actual performance averages for each group. In the first graph, the comparison is between PTA Milk and 305 day ME (Mature Equivalent) milk. The average ME milk for the top 25% of animals in the herd for PTA Milk was 27,523. The average ME milk for the bottom 25% of animals in the herd for PTA Milk was 23,105. This is a difference of 4,418 pounds between the top genetics for milk and the bottom genetics for milk. Wow! That’s a huge difference. Keep in mind that these animals all live in the same pen, are fed the same TMR, experience the same weather, and the same management. Now, imagine what could happen if we selected out the lowest animals in the herd (which we have been doing slowly). We automatically increase the production average of the herd without changing anything in the environment or feed. After that analysis, I wondered if we would see similar results looking at actual milk rather than ME (which is a calculated number) milk. The following graph compares PTA Milk to 1st lactation 305-day milk for 1st lactation cows only. We can’t compare animals across lactations because older cows naturally milk more. The results from this comparison were even more dramatic than the first one. The average 305-day milk for the top 25% of 1st lactation cows in the herd for PTA Milk was 22,452. The average 305-day milk for the bottom 25% of cows in the herd for PTA Milk was 17,685. This is a difference of 4,767 pounds between the top genetics for milk and the bottom genetics for milk. At a milk price of $18/cwt, this represented increased revenue of $858 per 1st lactation cow. This difference will be even larger as these cows mature. Of course, milk production isn’t the whole story of genetic selection. We also want to breed healthy, fertile cows with the physical conformation to have long, productive lives. With that in mind, we compared a few additional traits.
  • 15. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 15 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund In the following graph, cows are divided into three categories for PTA SCS (Somatic Cell Score): PTA SCS >3, PTA SCS=3, and PTA SCS<3. A lower PTA SCS is desired for this trait. The lactation average SCC for the worst group for PTA SCS was 142,515 cells/mL. The lactation average SCC for the best group for PTA SCS was 49,175 cells/mL. This represents a 93,140 difference in actual SCC. The cows that were supposed to be more resistant to mastitis were indeed more resistant. Practically, this is a huge difference in SCC. Imagine the impact that selecting for lower SCC can have on your bulk tank SCC. The next comparison was for fertility. Daughter pregnancy rate is defined as the percentage of nonpregnant cows that become pregnant during each 21-day period. It’s a great indicator of fertility. This trait is particularly important in our hot, humid climate where reproduction can be more of a challenge. For this analysis, the cows were divided into the top and bottom 50% of the herd for daughter pregnancy rate. The cows in the top 50% for daughter pregnancy rate averaged 98 days open. The cows in the bottom 50% for daughter pregnancy rate averaged 114 days open. Assuming a cost per day open of $3 per day, this is $48 per cow per lactation difference. The final comparison was for PTA Type compared to Final Classification Score. PTA Type represents the overall physical conformation (feet and legs, udder, body traits) of the cow. Final Classification Score is provided by an independent appraiser representing how close the animal is to the ideal for her breed. 100 points would be a perfect cow. The top 25% of the herd for PTA Type averaged 82.5 points for final classification score. The bottom 25% of the herd for PTA Type averaged 77.8 points for final classification score. This is a difference in 4.7 points for final classification score. This result shows that the animals that were supposed to be closer to the ideal Holstein genetically actually scored better. I am still amazed by these results. For each trait, the genetic prediction from genomic testing reflected actual within herd differences. This science really works. How can we use it? In the short term, we are using this information to cull the lower- end animals. The top animals are candidates for sexed semen. The bottom animals are now receiving beef semen. We are now testing all calves at birth. Heifers with poor genetics are culled before we spend money raising them only to see that their performance won’t be up to our new standards. In each case, we aren’t looking at individual traits by themselves. We select based on a selection index like Net Merit, TPI, JPI, or DWP that combines all traits into one formula. We want balanced cows that milk well, have less risk for disease, breed back quickly, last for multiple lactations, and look good. Genomic testing has already helped us increase production levels and select for healthier, longer living animals. But, we have just scratched the surface of these benefits. The KDDC Milk 4.0 program provides Kentucky dairy producers an opportunity to improve their herds through the use of genomic testing of females. You have the chance to use this technology at a lower price than anyone in the country! It’s an exciting opportunity.
  • 16. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 16 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund P reweaned calves in the first three weeks of life receive essentially all of their nutrients in liquid form. They also are the dairy animals most susceptible to cold stress because of their high surface-area-to-body- mass ratio. When the mercury drops, those calves expend more energy to maintain their body temperature. That draws nutrients away from immune function and growth. So it’s up to us to support those winter babies with added nutrients to keep them healthy and growing through frigid conditions. University of Illinois dairy researchers Sarah Morrison and Phil Cardoso addressed winter calf feeding in an issue of the Dairy Focus at Illinois newsletter. They noted a rule of thumb for energy needs of young calves is that for every 1˚F decrease in ambient temperature below 50˚F, a 1% increase in energy is required. Suggested ways to accomplish this are: 1. Feed higher amounts of milk or milk replacer – Adding a third daily feeding may be required to accomplish this. 2. Change liquid ration formulation – Increasing the nutrient density (up to no more than 16% solids) can pack more energy into every bottle or pail. Many milk replacer companies sell “winter blend” products that accomplish this, or a herd nutritionist can advise how to safely adjust the liquid-to-powder ratio. If feeding pasteurized whole milk, balancer powders can be added to achieve the same goal. 3. Increase starter-grain intake – This strategy will not work for the youngest calves under three weeks of age, but research has shown that older calves can compensate for higher nutrition demands in cold conditions by eating more starter. It is imperative that calves have access to fresh water to effectively employ this strategy. Ohio State University Professor and Extension Dairy Specialist Maurice Eastridge noted in a DairExnet Bulletin that a combination of these strategies also can be used. He said the ultimate nutrition target should be small-breed calves three weeks of age or less consuming 1.3 pounds of dry matter (DM) per day, and large-breed calves consuming 2.0 pounds DM daily. [Milk replacer is approximately 95% DM and whole milk is 13% DM.]. Fat targets should be 0.3 pounds of daily fat for small breeds, and 0.5 pounds for large-breed calves. Both the Illinois and Michigan State researchers noted important housing measures that can help calves maintain body heat and preserve nutrients. “Bedding for young calves is very important, because they lie down more than 18 hours a day,” said Cardoso. Deep, dry straw is considered the gold standard for calf bedding, as it allows the animals to “nest” and create stable air pockets free from draft. Wet bedding should be strenuously avoided, as it will produce 60% greater heat loss than dry bedding. Eastridge advised positioning calf hutches to ensure the prevailing wind is not blowing into the front of the hutch. A windbreak upwind of hutches will protect the area and reduce wind chill on calves. Clean, dry calf jackets also can help preserve body heat in the youngest animals. Overall, Eastridge said supporting preweaned calves in winter comes down to two basic elements: “Make sure calves have adequate nutrition to support their maintenance needs and still be able to grow; and make sure their housing conditions are not increasing their maintenance needs with drafts and wet bedding.” Time to Ramp up Calf Nutrients for Winter Maureen Hanson Dairy Herd Management
  • 17. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 17 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund P reg Rate: The percentage of cows eligible to become pregnant that are reported pregnant within a specific period of time. It is a measure of how well and how quickly cows have conceived and it accounts for both heat detection and conception rate. The assessment begins at the end of the VWP after calving and evaluates each 21-day period for eligible cows to determine the percent of cows that became pregnant. Every21-day period for a cow that lapses without a pregnancy reduces the herd’s Pregnancy Rate. Features you can control to help ensure pregnancy rates on the DHI-202 are as accurate as possible include: To get preg rate calculated you have to report an approximate number of days to preg check cows on the DHI Option 62. If marked N for this option, no preg rate will be calculated no matter what other info is reported. On the DHI-202 in the Remarks box there are often notes about reporting preg data. Some of the message include: COWS BRED BUT NOT DIAG. PREG (option 62=Y): you must report pregnancy results. Your pregnancy rate will be deflated if the program does not have pregnancy status. COWS BRED SINCE (option 62=N): the program will use non-return to identify pregnant cows. To change how the program uses reproductive data, discuss option 62 with your DHI technician. Regardless of the option you choose, you cannot compare pregnancy rates from the DHI-202 with pregnancy rates from PCDART or other on-farm systems unless you record all pregnancies ASAP after breeding. So to get accurate preg rates, these are the essential steps: 1. Enter approx. number of days you expect to preg check cows after breeding in DHI Option 62. Up to 99 days. Herds with N for this option will not have a preg rate calculated. 2. Be sure the Voluntary Waiting Period 'VWP' you have reported to DHIA is correct. Cows bred even just one day before VWP are not included in preg rate calculations at all. So, if anything go just a little long on the VWP. 3. Report Do Not Breed Cows with repro code C. After reported C, any repro event, even a heat adds them back into the eligible breeding herd and calculations for preg rate. 4. Report all preg diagnosis info in a timely manner. Use actual date of pregnancy diagnosis, not test day. If no diagnosis date is reported to Mid-South, the date of test will be used for the diagnosis date. 5. Schedule test day and herd repro work so your data is current on test day. If you want it to be most correct, don't test on Monday and do herd health on Tuesday. Do it the other way around. For the herds that have indicated they will be reporting pregs based on option 62 but who do not report preg data no preg rate will be calculated. Questions about preg rate? Ask your DHIA Technician or your KDDC consultant. Understanding Preg Rate Mark Witherspoon Dairy Revenue Protection (DRP) Is Here! This recently released USDA product (DRP) is designed to protect dairy farmers from the decline in quarterly revenue from milk sales. Contact us today for more information about protecting one of the biggest risks to your operation. In Business Since 1972 1-800-353-6108 www.shelbyinsuranceagency.com sia@iglou.com We are an equal opportunity provider
  • 18. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 18 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Wildcat Wisdom Donna Amaral-Phillips UK Dairy Extension Group How Do You Define the Role of Your Nutritional Consultant? I n my career, I have had the opportunity to participate in numerous youth educational events. I greatly enjoy seeing these future agricultural leaders and industry advocates wanting to learn about the science behind how we manage and care for animals, not just dairy cattle. Understanding the application of these concepts has always been a passion of mine, the reason I went on to Graduate School and have the job I do today. At these youth educational events, I often times have a nutrition- related station of which the content changes from year to year. One year, I decided to ask each of the groups what they thought a nutritionist’s role should be on a dairy. Not to my surprise, their response centered on balancing rations alone. This was the response from more than one group of youth on this day. Yes, nutritionists are actively involved in providing balanced rations, but their role can and should extend way beyond just crunching numbers to get a recipe to feed various groups of heifers or cows. Today, the role of nutritionists on farms is very different from those 20 years, even as shortly as 5 years, ago. So, how would I define a nutritionist’s role and skills needed on today’s dairy farms? Skill Needed: Ability to balance rations reflecting current science and knowledge To start with, today’s rations are balanced for an optimum performance while containing feed-related costs to achieve maximum profit, and not for least cost per se. Both potential production and reproductive performance along with feed cost drive farm profitability and need to be considered together when balancing rations. Rations also need to provide the best chances for maintaining an animal’s health and well-being, as well as being environmentally friendly. To bring all of these aspects together in one package or ration, the nutritionist needs a sound understanding of how cows convert nutrients found in feeds into milk and meat. Science in this area has accelerated greatly in recent years. Researchers are looking more at the mechanisms or the how’s behind why certain products, i.e. additives, or nutrients work and the impacts they have within the rumen or the cow herself. To understand and apply findings from this generation of research, one needs a science foundation to build upon (often in the form of advanced physiology, nutrition, and biochemistry classes) and they need to participate in continuing education opportunities to understand and apply these advances. This understanding is needed to not only balance rations for today’s industry and cows, but as importantly, to explain the merits of changes in suggested ration formulations, especially when they carry higher initial costs. Recent examples can include the use of ruminal- protected methionine in pre-fresh cows or the impact of certain fat supplements (specifically, certain fatty acids) on milk yield and components. Probably the best examples are the upcoming nutrition refinements associated with protein (specifically amino acids- the building blocks for protein) for lactating cows and in the requirements for calves and heifers. Skill Needed: Nutritionists are management consultants, not just “Ration Balancers” Sound nutrition programs are a result of the effective integration and application of not only nutritionally-related concepts, but also those associated with other “cow” management, agronomic, and economic aspects important to a dairy’s profitability and survival. Sometimes I am amazed by an assumption by some, including trained nutritionists, that nutritionists can only “do nutrition”. We possess the skills and training to understand the science behind concepts regardless of the discipline and have a unique skill set to apply and integrate various disciplines on farm. This understanding and ability to integrate various management aspects is important to achieve the expected results from properly designed feeding programs. Often times, nutritionists are the first person to detect an issue while it is developing and before it becomes a total disaster. This developing issue may not be directly related to the feeding program, but other aspects, such as reproduction or mastitis prevention. For example, nutritionists understand the important components associated with a reproductive program as breeding issues can easily derail any best designed and implemented feeding program. Cow comfort, be it stall maintenance, stocking density, or heat abatement, impact feed intake and rumination times. Nutritionists can be a sounding board as you consider changes in your operation’s cropping or management system or changes needed from an environmental standpoint. Additional aspects associated with environmental management are coming quickly and will need to be considered in feeding and overall management programs. Skill Needed: Ability to maintain and expand a professional relationship Many different combinations of feedstuffs and management practices can be incorporated into profitable feeding and management programs. A two-way dialog between a dairy manager and nutritionist sets the stage for this process and can be the difference between designing a profitable feeding program and overall operation and one that is not. Your
  • 19. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 19 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund nutritionist needs to understand your goals for your operation and on a routine basis discuss these goals with you, not just at the time of “getting your business”. On a routine basis, at least quarterly, they need to be able to explain to you why changes or certain components are part or should be part of your management program. Ration balancing is an on-going process, not one that is completed once yearly after fall crops are harvested. Tweaking a management program should occur in small steps, but is something which must be continuously explored. Dairy managers, in turn, need to understand why changes are needed, how to implement these changes, and continually ask questions of their nutritionist. A true dialog between all parties is important and do not forget to include others directly impacted by these discussions, such as family members or on-farm feed people. Probably, one of the hardest realizations is the fact that this is a professional, business relationship first and foremost, not based on a friendship or feeling that either party “owes” the other something. You may develop a friendship and share common interests outside of the dairy operation. But, this is separate from the business component of your relationship. Sometimes your nutritionist, or any consultant for that matter, needs to be honest with you and tell you something that you do not want to hear. Yes, this conversation may “hurt” your feelings, get you upset, and get you to contemplate “firing” this consultant. However, later you might come to realize that they had your best interest at heart and really were doing you a favor. The key part here is they want to help you understand how to correct the detected issue and work through steps needed to correct the identified issue. Basically, they want to help you with a solution. Skill Needed: What skill set do they offer- those of a nutritionist or a feed person? The skill set of a “feed person” is very different than those of a nutritionist, in my opinion. A feed person serves an important role in the feeding program, but one very different than a nutritionist. A feed person, very often, is sent to collect forage samples as needed, makes “social calls” to make sure managers are happy with services provided, recruits new clients for the business, and collects payments, when needed, to name just a few of this person’s possible responsibilities. Often times, the feed person does not have background to understand how cows use various nutrients and does not have the responsibility of balancing rations. In contrast, a nutritionist has some form of formal training in nutrition and physiology, continually participates in professional training opportunities for scientific updates, and is able to apply these concepts in the development of feeding and management programs on farm. Today’s ration balancing programs require one to have a sound understanding of what occurs in a cow’s rumen and in the cow herself. These computer programs calculate the amount and concentration of over 50 nutritionally-related nutrients and fractions, much different than older generation programs calculating just protein and energy concentrations. Nutritionists also should on a routine basis review management records to detect potential issues early, walk through the cows to “listen to the cows themselves”, and interact with the feed person, other employees and dairy manager as well to learn what is occurring on farm. One question I often get is, do you know a nutritionist that is not selling something that I can hire? One first needs to realize that all nutritionists form personal opinions of what products, ingredients, and nutrient specs work best on farms, irrespective of whom pays their salary. This is just human nature. The difference comes in how they form these opinions and how they modified or update them over time. Are their opinions regarding a product or ingredient based on their company’s or personal profit margin or have they seen research that supports that said product/ingredient can deliver the intended benefit? I think you would agree that both sides of this coin exist in nutritionists serving the US Dairy Industry. The key here is to ask questions that allow one to determine if the selected products/ingredients are the best match for providing an optimum feeding program for your cows and if this person/ nutritionist possesses the skills to help you, the dairy manager, better manage your cows’ profitability. This answer will not be the same for everyone. Just make sure what skills you are wanting, those associated with a feed person or a nutritionist, and use these people accordingly. Bottom Line: Nutritionists are a professional whom plays a very important role in helping you implement and manage sound feeding and management programs. They are trained to understand how cows make milk and how to make the best of this biological system for your operation’s potential profitability. They offer a skill set that goes beyond those associated just with balancing rations. As dairy managers, your job is to make the best use of their skill set in your dairy business.
  • 20. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 20 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Brown Swiss Junior show Component Merit Cow Fairdale Total Cali-ET Emily Goode, Liberty KY State Herd Award Kentucky Brown Swiss, Glasgow KY Junior Showmanship 1st Hudson Spoonamore, Stanford KY 2nd Hadley Spoonamore, Stanford KY Brown Swiss Open show Senior Champion Female and Reserve Grand Champion Fairdale Total Cali-ET Emily Goode, Liberty KY NASCO Award Pine Tree Rich Alli 7462 ET Fairdale Farm LLC, Worthville, KY Guernsey Junior Showmanship 1st Cade Huffman, Summer Shade KY Jersey Lifetime Cheese Production Class 1st Hirds Colton Dream Keightley Core and Borba, Salvisa KY GJPI Grand Champion Hirds Colton Dream Keightley Core and Borba, Salvisa KY Brown Swiss Junior show Component Merit Cow Fairdale Total Cali-ET Emily Goode, Liberty KY State Herd Award Kentucky Brown Swiss, Glasgow KY Congratulations To The Kentucky 2021 North American International Livestock Exposition Champions
  • 21. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 21 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund GJPI Cow Recognition Awards Hirds Colton Dream Keightley Core and Borba, Salvisa KY Senior Champion Female Hirds Colton Dream Keightley Core and Borba, Salvisa KY Grand Champion Female Hirds Colton Dream Keightley Core and Borba, Salvisa KY Premier Performance Cow Hirds Colton Dream Keightley Core and Borba, Salvisa KY Reserve Open Supreme Dairy Cow Hirds Colton Dream Keightley Core and Borba, Salvisa KY Milking Shorthorn Junior Showmanship 1st Sophie Franklin, Waddy KY Reserve Intermediate Champion Female Hard Core KY-Blue Abigail EXP, Taylor Graves, Danville KY Red & White Reserve Intermediate Senior Champion Female Golden-oaks Topprize-Red-Et, Emily & Leann Goode, Liberty KY Reserve Junior Champion Female MS-AOL Recharge-Red_ET, Hadley Olt/Hallie Griffiths, Greensburg Ky Reserve Grand Champion Female Golden-oaks Topprize-Red-Et, Emily & Leann Goode, Liberty KY State Herd Award 1st Kentucky Open Red & White, Greensburg KY
  • 22. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 22 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Tennessee Titans and The Dairy Alliance Award $10,000 Grant to Warren County Public Schools The Dairy Alliance and the Tennessee Titans awarded Warren County Public Schools through the Fuel Up to Play 60 Hometown Grant. A check presentation of $10,000 and celebration were held at Henry F. Moss Middle School in late October. Tennessee Titans’ mascot T-Rac, former Titans’ linebacker Gerald McRath and Olympic foil fencer Lee Kiefer took part in the day’s festivities, as did local dairy farmer Carl Chaney of Chaney’s Dairy Barn. The NFL, through Fuel Up to Play 60, provides $10,000 in each NFL club market in grant money annually. The Hometown Grant provides deserving schools with funding to facilitate sustainable physical activity and healthy eating programs for students. The Hometown Grant awarded is the first one given to a Kentucky school district. The funds will be used to promote healthy eating and physical activity at three Warren County middle schools: Drakes Creek, Henry F. Moss and South Warren Middle School. The schools will purchase physical education equipment and smoothie bikes, as well as add smoothies to the cafeteria’s breakfast menu. The blenders in the smoothie bikes are powered by students’ pedaling, an interactive way for students to learn about real milk’s nutrition and fun ways to exercise. Between the equipment obtained from the grant and the celebration featuring successful athletes, students will remember the importance of choosing dairy products at mealtimes Dairy Training Teaches Farm Gate to Plate to Kentucky Nutrition Professionals in Academia The Dairy Alliance hosted a virtual communications training in October to educate nutrition professionals about dairy. The training, Debunking Milk Myths: From the Farm Gate to MyPlate, included professors and dietetic internship directors in nutritional science departments from universities across the southeast. These individuals are teaching future nutrition students and policymakers, making it vital that they can successfully communicate facts about dairy farming, dairy sustainability and dairy nutrition. Attending from Kentucky were two Murray State University employees: Nutrition Program Director and Assistant Professor Lauren Roberson, Ph.D., MS, RD, LD, and Dietetic Internship Director and Assistant Professor Nichole Haynes, MS, RD, LDN. New York dairy farmer and Registered Dietitian Abbey Copenhaver presented “Farming with RDNs: What Nutrition Professionals Need to Know about Agriculture” before communications trainer Teri Goudie taught participants how to answer questions students and consumers have on nutrition, food and agriculture. By the end of the training, attendees had learned not only dairy’s story, but how to best share that story with others through their academic roles
  • 23. November - December 2021 • KDDC • Page 23 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Allied Sponsors PLATINUM Alltech Bel Cheese Bluegrass Dairy & Food Burkmann Feeds Cowherd Equipment CPC Commodities Kentucky Department of Agriculture Kentucky Farm Bureau Kentucky Soybean Board Prairie Farms Shaker Equipment Sales Zoetis GOLD DFA Givens & Houchins Inc. KAEB Services Mid-South Dairy Records Owen Transport Select Sires Mid-America SILVER Day and Day Feed Givens & Houchins Inc. Grain Processing Corporation Kentucky Veterinary Medical Association Luttrull Feed Nutra Blend South Central Bank Southland Dairy Farmers BRONZE AgCentral Agri Feed International, LLC Bagdad Rolling Mills Bank of Jamestown Central Farmers Supply Hartland Animal Hospital Kentucky Corn Growers Association Limestone & Cooper Mammoth Cave Dairy Auction QMI Quality Mgt Inc. Nutra Blend Smith Creek Inc Wilson Trucking Special Thanks to Our Sponsors
  • 24. 176 Pasadena Drive Lexington, KY 40503 859.516.1129 ph www.kydairy.org Non-Profit US Postage PAID JAN 11 Value-Added Food Safety Workshop, WKU, Bowling Green JAN 17-19 Georgia Dairy Conference, Savannah, GA FEB 22 KDDC Young Producer Conference & Trade Show, Sloan Convention Center, Bowling Green FEB 22 Dairy Awards Banquet, 6:30pm Sloan Convention Center, Bowling Green FEB 23 Kentucky Dairy Partners Conference & Trade Show, Sloan Convention Center, Bowling Green Calendar of Events