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KY Milk Matters July/August 2021

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Kentucky Dairy Development Council

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KY Milk Matters July/August 2021

  1. 1. July - August 2021 • KDDC • Page 1 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Milk Matters J u l y - A u g u s t w w w. k y d a i r y. o r g K E N T U C K Y Supported by Meat Me at the Table page 6 World Dairy Expo Fall Trip page 9 WKU Smart Holstein Lab Formed page 14 M eredith Scales, Kentucky Dairy Development Council (KDDC) consultant in the southern region, retired effective July 31, 2021. He had been with KDDC since October 11, 2011. He is very thankful and appreciative to all the people that helped make the experience such an enjoyable one. He enrolled at The University of Kentucky Community College in Somerset in August 1967. Before he transferred to the main campus in Lexington, he and his high school sweetheart, Mary “Rethie” Roberts, were married on August 8,1969. That was the beginning of a soul bonding relationship that has been on going. If you saw Meredith at any dairy event, you most likely saw Rethie there by his side. She loves people as much as he does. Merdith and Rethie have one daughter, Jennifer. She and her husband Seth have two wonderful children Alexa and Owen. These two children are the apple of their eye. After he graduated from The University of Kentucky College of Agriculture in December 1971, he began a lifetime in the dairy industry. He began his dairy career with The Cudahy Cheese Company in Russell Springs, Kentucky on January 01, 1972. During his tenure with Cudahy, he had the opportunity to be a part of all four plants in Kentucky. He trained at the Tompkinsville operation, head fieldman and assistant plant manager at the Russell Springs operation, plant manager at the Cynthiana operation, shipping supervisor at the Harrodsburg operation, quality control manager at the Russell Springs and Tompkinsville operations and later the plant superintendent at the Russell Springs operation until the closure of the plants in 1981. On January 25, 1982, he continued his career in the dairy industry as a fieldman with Southern Belle Dairy, Somerset, Kentucky working with The Southeastern Graded Milk Producers Association’s dairy farmers that supplied milk to the plant. In October 1985 he assumed the position as field supervisor for the procurement of milk and balancing the milk supply for Southern Belle Dairy. After many acquisitions, Prairie Farms Inc. purchased Southern Belle Dairy in 2007 and continued on page 7
  2. 2. July - August 2021 • KDDC • Page 2 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund 2021 KDDC Board of Directors & Staff Executive Committee President: Freeman Brundige Vice President: Charles Townsend, DVM Sec./Treasurer: Tom Hastings EC Member: Greg Goode EC Past President: Richard Sparrow Board of Directors District 1: Freeman Brundige 731.446.6248 District 2: Josh Duvall 270.535.6533 District 3: Keith Long 270.670.1388 District 4: Bill Crist Jr. 270.590.3185 District 5: Tony Compton 270.378.0525 District 6: Mark Williams 270.427.0796 District 7: Greg Goode 606.303.2150 District 8: Steve Weaver 270.475.3154 District 9: Jerry Gentry 606.875.2526 District 10: Terry Rowlette 502.376.2292 District 11: Stewart Jones 270.402.4805 District 12: John Kuegel 270.316.0351 Equipment: Tony Cowherd 270.469.0398 Milk Haulers: Mike Owen 270.392.1902 Genetics: Dan Johnson 502.905.8221 Feed: Tom Hastings 270.748.9652 Nutrition: Elizabeth Lunsford Alltech 859.553.0072 Dairy Co-op: Stephen Broyles 859.421.9801 Veterinary: Dr. Charles Townsend 270.726.4041 Finance: Todd Lockett 270.590.9375 Heifer Raiser: Bill Mattingly 270.699.1701 Former Pres.: Richard Sparrow 502.370.6730 Employee & Consultants Executive Director: H.H. Barlow 859.516.1129 kddc@kydairy.org DC-Central: Beth Cox PO Box 144, Mannsville, KY 42758 bethcoxkddc@gmail.com 859.516.1619 • 270-469-4278 DC-Western: Dave Roberts 1334 Carrville Road, Hampton, KY 42047 roberts@kydairy.org 859.516.1409 DC-Northern: Jennifer Hickerson PO Box 293, Flemingsburg, KY 41041 j.hickersonkddc@gmail.com 859.516.2458 KDDC 176 Pasadena Drive • Lexington, KY 40503 www.kydairy.org KY Milk Matters produced by Carey Brown President’s Corner Freeman Brundige C onfidence – the feeling or belief that one can rely on someone or something. Regretfully many of us longtime dairy farmers have lost confidence in the people and organizations that we put our trust in over the years. Mainly we are not sure that they have our best interest at heart. This includes promotion, pricing, political, and definitely marketing, all of which are paid with money from our milk checks or taxes. A lot of the blame for this has to be shared with us, the farmers, for not speaking up when we saw things going in the wrong direction. We had blind trust in people to work for us. Some of that is understandable with the constant stress that dairy farming has been for lots of the past years. Old saying: “It is hard to remember that the mission was to drain the swamps, when you are up to your ass in alligators.” This can’t be changed overnight, but maybe if all of us start being more aware of what our member organizations are planning and forcing them to be transparent in their vetting process. We need to try to elect directors and representatives that are in touch with the feelings of their constituents. It won’t be an easy task but maybe we can turn some of this around. At times there has to be accountability for bad decisions and lack of interest. N O T I C E KY No Discharge Operating Permits are due for renewal by September 30, 2021. However, new forms have not been established by the Division of Water so producer’s current permits will carry over until new ones are established. KDDC will keep dairy producers informed and let you know when they become available. Again, your current KNDOP will continue to be effective until new renewal forms are available.
  3. 3. DEFEAT THE HEAT W I T H Y E A - S A C C ® Heat stress in your dairy herd decreases milk production, lowers reproduction, increases acidosis and causes a long list of other costly issues. For you, that means less profitability, less efficiency and even more work to do. Yea-Sacc is a feed additive specifically designed to help cows combat heat stress by promoting dry matter intake and stabilizing rumen microbes. Defeat the “dip” of summer by joining hundreds of producers who have made the switch to YEA-SACC®. INCREASES INTAKE PROMOTES NUTRIENT UTILIZATION STABILIZES RUMEN PH PROMOTES MILK PRODUCTION + Elizabeth Lunsford Territory Sales Manager elunsford@alltech.com 859.553.0072 Alltech.com AlltechNaturally @Alltech
  4. 4. July - August 2021 • KDDC • Page 4 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Executive Director Comments H H Barlow I n the midst of the dog days of summer, KDDC is very active with programs and meetings. At the end of June, we had a very successful Beef on Dairy conference at Blue Grass Stockyards with over 60 in attendance. I never dreamed a few years ago that I would be talking about breeding my Jersey cows to beef bulls. With the advent of sexed semen, dairy breeding has changed. Nearly every dairyman I talk to has an abundant supply of heifers. Many have more than they need, therefore the value of heifers has really declined. The other new challenge is many dairies are feeding these excess heifers creating an extra expense for the farm. The recommendation now is breeding the bottom 40% of your herd to special selected beef bulls creating a very desirable crossbred calf for beef feedlots. This improved bred calf has been averaging $100 to $150 higher than the purebred dairy bull calf. Our conference showed there is a definite demand and facilities for these crossbred calves. One critical issue to capture these extra dollars is making sure you breed to the correct beef bull who has the carcass traits the processor demands. Just breeding to any black bull will not earn the extra dollars. This is new technology that can be an extra income stream. In mid- July, KDDC hosted a Value-Added Dairy Processing conference in Bowling Green with over 70 participants. This conference was a collaboration with The University of Tennessee and North Carolina State University. KDDC is working with Tennessee and NC State on this multi-million dollar USDA grant to help create dairy Value-Added enterprises. There is a national move afoot to improve and enlarge local food supplies. This grant is available to dairy farmers who want to start or enlarge an on farm processing venture. The money available can only be used for dairy equipment and not bricks and mortar. This program is an excellent opportunity for any producer who wishes to add value to the milk he is producing. Contact any consultant for more information. County fairs and District Dairy shows are taking place with excellent participation. The Barren County fair had a kiddie class with over thirty-two participants. If that is any indication, dairy showing will be active for years to come. State Fair preparation is ongoing and is always a great time for fellowship and fun. The fair is supposed to be back to normal so I hope to see you there. In the dairy world, it is a time of great challenges. I have always considered myself to be an optimist, but most of the news for milk prices, feed prices and too much overall milk production are all troubling. The national milk herd is over 9.5 million head. This is the largest herd since 1994 and with higher production per cow than ever before, we have an oversupply of milk which is depressing prices. Thank God for exports which are at their all-time highest level. One day out of every six days production is exported. Since the beginning of 2020, KDDC has been involved in Federal Order reform and dairy legislation. I have been on numerous calls with Southeast stakeholders and dairy leaders from all across the country and the result is, there just isn’t any agreement that all dairymen support. Without industry-wide support, pricing reform will be extremely difficult. At the present time, there is a proposal by the American Dairy Coalition to return the Class I mover price to the higher of Class III or Class IV instead of the average, plus $.74. This new Class I pricing method promoted depooling, which caused losses of over $725 million to dairy farmers. These numbers were documented and can be seen in the July 7, 2021 issue of Progressive Dairymen. The summary article, by Dave Natzke, documented that 21% ($155 million) of the losses occurred in the Southeast. The Southeast only has 5.5% of the milk and we took 21% of the losses. This actually equaled $1.25/cwt. KDDC supports the return to the higher of pricing mechanism. It is a legislative decision and is supposed to be proposed in Congress. If and when the legislation comes up for a vote, we will inform all Kentucky dairymen to contact their Senators. KDDC consultant, Meredith Scales, announced his retirement July 31st. Meredith is a great person who has been a wonderful asset to the Kentucky dairy industry. I’m going to miss my good friend, but I wish him well in his retirement. Please check out his storied career of 50 years, with the last 10 in KDDC, in a tribute to him in this newsletter. Also, Eunice Schlappi is retiring from the Kentucky Department of Agriculture as Dairy Marketing Specialist. Everyone involved in the dairy industry knows Eunice. We are all aware of the many, many contributions she has made to KDDC and all of dairying. I think she should be named Miss Kentucky Dairy. The good thing about Eunice’s story is that she is a partner with her nephew in their own dairy and she still plans to help with many of our KDDC events, such as the World Dairy Expo trip. We’ll definitely miss Meredith and Eunice. I’m announcing a job opening for Dairy Consultant in the central region. More information is on our website and you can contact President Freeman Brundige, Dave Roberts or me if you are interested. You must submit a resume. As in all area’s of life, change is taking place in KDDC. The board and staff are committed to continue working hard and serving all of our producers. It’s HOT and July is National Ice Cream month so have a double dip every day and thank a dairyman.
  5. 5. LIMITED TIME OFFERS! Contact your local GEA milking equipment dealer for a quote! Take advantage of great savings on five different detacher options. Save up to 25% on GEA detachers and optional accessories. • DeMax 55 and 55S • Dematron 60 • Dematron 70 and 75 Which system is best for you? Your local GEA dealer can recommend a solution to meet your needs! Prepare for the future and save up to 25% on a complete CowScout system! With CowScout you can monitor cow activity, eating time and rumination for better heat detection. Integrate CowScout with any GEA robotic or conventional milking system and make quicker, more accurate decisions. CowScout™ SAVINGS! Detacher TRADE OUT! YOUR LOCAL GEA DEALER: Trenton Farm Supply LLC 2470 Cemetary Rd. Trenton, KY 42286 (270) 466-3180
  6. 6. July - August 2021 • KDDC • Page 6 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Meat Me at the Table HH Barlow A nimal Agriculture stood tall “Front and Center” July 7th at the Tim White farm in Fayette County. The Kentucky Livestock Coalition sponsored the event to promote all animals that contribute to America’s fantastic food supply. Just think about meals without beef, pork, chicken and specialty items like lamb or goat and all of the great tasting dairy products that come from cows. Consumers are blessed to have these wonderful products that are nutritious, healthy and super tasty. Meat Me at the Table is an idea from the Livestock Coalition to bring awareness to our respective animal agriculture enterprises and stand against groups who want to eliminate animal agriculture. The event was attended by approximately 100 people including Lt. Governor Jacqueline Coleman who presented a proclamation designating July as Meat Me at the Table month. Warren Beeler, spokesperson for the Coalition gave an inspiring talk about how we do animal production so much better than 50 years ago. Production is up dramatically in every species with much less resources used and a smaller carbon footprint than created in the past. Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles called livestock “Super Heroes” for converting grass into tasty meat. The event closed with everyone being served all varieties of the meat represented and topped off with delicious ice cream. Further events will be planned in the future along with special emphasis at the Ky. State Fair. All promoting meat, the real natural protein!!!
  7. 7. July - August 2021 • KDDC • Page 7 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Cowherd Equipment & Rental Inc. Cowherd Equipment & Rental, Inc. Cowherd Equipment & Rental, Inc. 1483 Old Summersville Rd. 1483 Old Summersville Rd. Campbellsville, KY 42718 Campbellsville, KY 42718 Office 270-465-2679 Office 270-465-2679 Tony 270-469-0398 Tony 270-469-0398 Vince 270-469-5095 Vince 270-469-5095 Cowherd Equipment & Rental, In For More Information Cowherd Equipment & Ren 1483 Old Summersville Campbellsville, KY 42 Office 270-465-2679 Tony 270-469-0398 Vince 270-469-5095 Penta 4030 Tire Scraper J&D Head Locks Hagedorn Manure Sp Silage Defacer Penta 4930 Cowherd Equipment & Rental, Inc. For More Information: Cowherd Equipment & Rental, Inc. 1483 Old Summersville Rd. Campbellsville, KY 42718 Office 270-465-2679 Tony 270-469-0398 Vince 270-469-5095 Penta 4030 Tire Scraper J&D Head Locks Hagedorn 5440 Manure Spreader Silage Defacer Penta 4930 Cowherd E Penta 4030 T J&D Head Locks Silage Defacer Roto-Mix Mixers Tire Scraper Hagedorn 5440 Manure Spreader Penta 4030 J&D Head Locks transitioned the producer group to be Prairie Farms members. He continued his career with Prairie Farms until he retired on March 01, 2011. Not long after his retirement from Prairie Farms Inc, he learned the KDDC consultant’s position was vacant in the southern region. He applied for the position and on October 11, 2011, was blessed to get the opportunity to be a part of one of the greatest dairy organizations, the Kentucky Dairy Development Council. He says he is grateful to have had the privilege to serve as consultant for nine years, nine months and twenty days. He hopes the future will be bright for KDDC and the dairy farmers in Kentucky and may God bless each and everyone. He hopes with God’s grace, he will have some time to do more church activities, follow the grandkids, travel, and farm a little bit if it comes handy. He again wants to thank everyone for the opportunity and privilege to be associated with such a dynamic industry for forty-nine years and seven months. continued from cover
  8. 8. July - August 2021 • KDDC • Page 8 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Agricultural Exemption Number Required for Tax Exempt On-farm Purchases E ffective January 1, 2022, KRS 139.481 requires that farmers have an Agriculture Exemption Number for use on Forms 51A158 and 51A159 to make purchases exempt from sales tax. The application form can be found at the Department of Revenue website http://www.revenue.ky.gov under Sales Tax Forms. Farmers are asked to submit applications to the Kentucky Department of Revenue via email at DOR.Webresponsesalestax@ky.gov or to the following address: Division of Sales and Use Tax Department of Revenue P.O. Box 181 Frankfort, Kentucky 40602-0181 After approval of the application, the department will issue an Agriculture Exemption Number to the applicant by letter. Until an Agriculture Exemption Number has been assigned, the farmer may still issue a farm exemption certificate by using the farmer’s driver’s license number as an identifier. The driver’s license number can no longer be used on the farm exemption certificate after July 1, 2022. Please contact the Division of Sales and Use Tax at 502-564-5170, option 1 with any additional questions. Shelby Dairy Revenue Protection (DRP) Is Here! This recently released USDA product (DRP) is designed to protect dairy farmers from the decline in quarterly revenue from milk sales. Contact us today for more information about protecting one of the biggest risks to your operation. In Business Since 1972 1-800-353-6108 www.shelbyinsuranceagency.com sia@iglou.com We are an equal opportunity provider Glasgow, KY In Glasgow: On the Web: In Danville: 1-800-589-2174 www.burkmann.com 1-800-786-2875 Kubota Giveaway Sponsored In Part By: November 2021
  9. 9. July - August 2021 • KDDC • Page 9 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund FALL TOUR: SAVE THE DATE September 28th through October 1st KDDC World Dairy Expo Fall Trip is happening in 2021!! Get your registrations in quick seats are limited. REGISTRATION FORM KDDC/YDP Wisconsin Tour (September 28- October 1, 2021) FIRST ATTENDEE ADDRESS BIRTHDATE (IF UNDER 21) SECOND ATTENDEE BIRTHDATE (IF UNDER 21) ADDRESS 2 HOME PHONE CELL PHONE EMAIL $150 Young Dairy Producers/KDDC Board Member – young farmers must meet criteria - limit 2 per dairy farm at $150 - additional members from farm at $300 - $50 each non-refundable $300 All other dairy farmers-per person - $50 non-refundable $600 Industry representatives (non-sponsor) - $50 non-refundable $300 Industry rep ($1000 - $1499 sponsor) - $50 non-refundable TOTAL ENCLOSED Make checks payable to: KDDC Send registration/check to: Jennifer Hickerson KDDC PO Box 293 Flemingsburg, Ky 41041 (After your registration is received, we will send you a full agenda once it is set)
  10. 10. July - August 2021 • KDDC • Page 10 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Kentucky June DAIRY MONTH Proclomation 2021
  11. 11. DWP$ provides proven predictions designed to help producers make more profitable decisions. In the first 10 years of genomic testing, Zoetis® has driven to find profitable outcomes through genetic selection for producers. DWP$ was the result of this research and has been helping operations make genetic decisions since 2016. Recently, the DWP$ validation that Zoetis completed was published in a peer reviewed publication (Journal of Dairy Science) that reported DWP$ as a reliable tool to predict lifetime profitability for dairy producers. Every $1 increase in DWP$ was correlated with $1.84 more in observed lifetime profit DAIRY WELLNESS PROFIT INDEX® (DWP$®) PROVIDES LIFETIME PROFIT PREDICTIONS FOR DAIRY PRODUCERS CLARIFIDE® PLUS A PROVEN WAY TO GENOMICALLY SELECT AND BREED FOR MORE PROFITABLE ANIMALS WITH DWP$® The validation study was completed using more than 2000 Holsteins that were genomically tested and ranked on the 2018 version of DWP$. In this study animals were ranked on their DWP$ value in 2012. The top graph illustrates these results found that Best 25% DWP$ group generated $811 more profit in their lifetime than the worst 25%, meaning that this group of animals saw $1.84 more lifetime profit for every 1 point increase in DWP$. This included using a discount rate (interest rate) of 10.5% and taking into account heifer replacement costs. In the table above you will also see that these animals had highly correlated DWP$ rankings with production performance in daily and lifetime measures. Dairy Wellness Profit Index guides selection for cows with increased salable milk leading to increased profits. DWP$ Genetic Group a-c Marginal means with different superscripts differ (P<0.01), SEM=297 Association between DWP$ and Observed Lifetime Profit DWP$ 2018 Genetic Group Daily ECM (lbs.) Lifetime ECM (lbs.) 0-25% 72 54740 26-50% 76 64522 51-75% 76 68589 76-100% 78 74757 Difference Between Best and Worst Groups 6 20017 $- $200 $400 $600 $800 $1,000 $1,200 Worst 25% $167a $561b $706b $978c 26-50% 51-75% Best 25%
  12. 12. July - August 2021 • KDDC • Page 12 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Dixie Dairy Report July 2021 Calvin Covington Cow numbers keep growing. According to USDA, the nation’s dairy herd is estimated at 9.505 million head at the end of May. As the graph below shows, this is 145,000 more head than last May. Six states, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, South Dakota, Texas, and Wisconsin account for 124,000 of the increase in dairy cows. Texas leads the way with 32,000 more cows. Pennsylvania had the largest decline, down 8,000 head. More cows, along with more milk per cow (milk per cow is up 1.2% this year) results in more milk. May milk production was 4.6% higher than last May. Due to the pandemic, May 2020 milk production was 0.5% lower than the previous year, compared to May 2019 this May’s production was still up over 4%. For the year-to-date, production is 2.3% greater than a year ago. For the three Southeast reporting states, May production numbers were mixed. After 12 months of consecutive lower production, Florida production in May was up 0.5% due to more milk per cow. However, compared to May 2019 production was 5.6% lower. Georgia saw a May production increase of 2%, again due to more milk per cow. Virginia’s production was 2.3% lower, due to 2,000 fewer cows. For the year-to-date, production in the three Southeast reporting states is 3.6% lower, a large contrast between the national increase of 2.3%. Cheese price tumbles. The June CME block cheddar price declined $0.18/lb. from May. This is the lowest June block price since 2009. Barrel cheddar dropped $0.13/lb. In May and June, the barrel price was higher than block. Lower cheese prices are primarily due to large supply of cheese resulting from an abundance of milk, plus new and expansion at current cheese plants. For the months of March, April, and May combined, cheese production was 5.9% higher than the same three months last year and 4.7% higher than 2019. Other factors moving cheese prices lower include: food service sales softening as inventories are replenished, transportation challenges, and difficulty in fully staffing dairy plants. During the past week, blocks recovered slightly closing at $1.5435/lb. on July 2, but barrels retreated to $1.4955/lb. As shown below, butter declined slightly in June, but the price remains relatively steady. Butter production is below a year ago, and exports are almost three times greater than last year. Moving to the other two products determining federal order class prices, the June nonfat dry milk powder (NDM) Dairy Product Sales Report (DPSR) price was $1.2696/lb., up three cents from May, and the highest NDM price since 2014. Due to increased NDM production (31% more than last May) further price increases in the coming months look doubtful. After almost a year of monthly price increases, the June DPSR dry whey price fell a fraction of a penny to $0.6437/lb. More cheese means more whey products. The bottom line, the abundant supply of milk is moving dairy product prices lower, which in turn results in lower milk prices. As shown below, the lower cheese price pushed the July Class I Mover down $0.87/cwt., and the June Class III price down $1.75/cwt. June Class II and IV prices increased slightly. A lower August Class I Mover is projected along with lower prices for the three other classes in July. Current projections show the June Class I Mover and the May Class III, are the highs for the year. Relatively strong Class III prices are a large contributor for increased milk production, especially in areas with a high percentage of milk used in cheese. Time will tell the impact of lower, Class III prices on milk production in the heavy cheese producing areas. Fluid milk sales continue to struggle. May was another challenging month for Class I sales. In all federal orders, producer milk utilized in Class I was 4.7% lower than last May or about 5 million less lbs. of milk per day used in Class I (additional milk that ended up in cheese or NDM). For the year to-date, total federal order Class I producer milk is 3.7% lower than 2020 and 5.3% below 2019. The three southeastern federal NUMBER OF DAIRY COWS AT THE END OF MAY (2014-2021)
  13. 13. July - August 2021 • KDDC • Page 13 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Milk Prices FMMO 5 www.malouisville.com July 2021 Class 1 Advanced Price (@3.5%BF) $20.82 August 2021 Class 1 Advanced Price (@3.5%BF) $20.20 FMMO 7 www.fmmmatlanta.com July 2021 Class 1 Advanced Price (@3.5%BF) $ 21.22 August 2021 Class 1 Advanced Price (@3.5%BF) $20.70 FEDERAL ORDER CLASS PRICES (2021 YTD) CLASS JANUARY FEBRUARY MARCH APRIL MAY JUNE JULY ($/cwt. 3.5% fat) Class I Mover $15.14 $15.54 $15.20 $15.51 $17.10 $18.29 $17.42 Clas II $14.18 $14.00 $15.07 $15.56 $16.22 $16.66 Class III $16.04 $15.75 $16.15 $17.67 $18.96 $17.21 Class IV $13.75 $13.19 $14.18 $15.52 $16.16 $16.35 orders did a little better than the national average. May Class I producer milk in the Florida order was almost identical to last May. The Southeast and Appalachian orders were down 4.4% and 6.7%, respectively. Combined, May Class I producer milk in all three orders was down 4.4%. For the year-to-date Class I producer milk is 4.6% below last year. Blend prices. Even though Southeast milk production is on a downhill slope, it is still economically important to the Southeast. USDA’s 2020 Milk Production, Disposition and Income Summary reports cash receipts from 2020 milk sales in the Southeast States almost $1.7 billion. The following table shows the cash receipts for each Southeast state. Blend prices continue to advance. May blend prices, in all three Southeast orders, were about $1.00/cwt. higher than April. As shown below we project June blend prices up $0.95/cwt. in the Appalachian, up $1.34/cwt. in the Florida, and up $1.33/cwt. in the Southeast orders. Unless there is a significant decline in milk production or a surge in demand, June will likely be the high blend prices for the year. A $0.50-$0.85/cwt. decline is projected for July and a smaller decline in August. CME CHEESE AND BUTTER PRICES (JANUARY-JUNE 2021) CLASS JAN FEB MAR APR MAY JUN Cheddar (block) $1.7470 $1.5821 $1.7362 $1.7945 $1.6778 $1.4978 Cheddar (barrel) $1.5141 $1.4420 $1.4811 $1.7119 $1.6923 $1.5639 Butter $1.3496 $1.3859 $1.7153 $1.8267 $1.8124 $1.7758 PROJECTED* BLEND PRICES – Base Zones – SOUTHEASTERN FEDERAL ORDERS MONTH APPALACHIAN FLORIDA SOUTHEAST ($/cwt. at 3.5% butterfat – base zone) APRIL 2021 $18.43 $20.21 $18.46 MAY $19.35 $21.26 $19.52 JUNE $20.30 $22.60 $20.85 JULY $19.80 $21.75 $20.03 AUGUST $19.60 $21.43 $19.58 SEPTEMBER $19.55 $21.48 $19.82 *projections in bold
  14. 14. July - August 2021 • KDDC • Page 14 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Holstein Association USA and Western Kentucky University Announce Formation of WKU SmartHolstein Lab H olstein Association USA, in partnership with Western Kentucky University (WKU) and the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund, is thrilled to announce the formation of the WKU SmartHolstein Lab. The lab, located at the WKU Agriculture Research and Education Center, is designed to be a research, development, and demonstration center for the dairy industry. “We’re delighted to be able to work with Western Kentucky University on the WKU SmartHolstein Lab partnership. This creative initiative gives us the opportunity to work with new dairy technology and data and assess how it can be of value to Association members and the dairy community at large,” states Holstein Association USA Chief Executive Officer John M. Meyer. The mission of the WKU SmartHolstein Lab is to lead Holstein and dairy advancements through research, development, and outreach in technologies, analytics, and genetics. This endeavor will also provide students with unique experiential learning opportunities. “The WKU SmartHolstein Lab is a remarkable collaboration with Holstein Association USA, the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund, and a number of dairy industry partners. This collaboration will provide unique opportunities that will directly benefit our students, dairy producers, and the dairy industry in general,” says Dr. Fred DeGraves, Chair, Western Kentucky University Department of Agriculture & Food Science. “We are excited with the synergism this collaboration offers and look forward to the wide array of opportunities in teaching, research, and outreach that this project will generate. We would like to thank Holstein Association USA, the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board, the Kentucky Dairy Development Council, our dairy industry collaborators, and dairy producers from across the Commonwealth of Kentucky for their support of this project. The WKU SmartHolstein Lab will greatly enhance the educational experience of our Agriculture & Food Science students. Our program is all about providing experiential learning opportunities and this Lab will allow our students to work with cutting-edge technologies on a daily basis. In addition to classroom and laboratory activities, our students provide the day-to-day labor that operates the dairy, which will allow our students to become quite familiar with the technologies. They will also be directly involved with the assessment of these technologies through applied research projects, which will offer an opportunity for students to have a role in improving the technologies. Our students will experience first-hand genomic testing, genetic selection strategies, and advanced analytics. Understanding these technologies will be fundamental to the success of our future dairy producers and having the WKU SmartHolstein Lab as a demonstration herd will provide the ideal classroom environment for making this happen.” The WKU dairy farm is set up to milk 50 cows and raise associated replacement heifers. The long-term goal is to develop a 100% A2, polled herd of cows in the top 20% of the breed for TPI with additional emphasis on health, reproduction, and fitness traits. To increase the genetic potential of the herd at the WKU SmartHolstein Lab, Holstein Association USA members are invited to donate Registered Holstein® animals or embryos through the Send a Holstein to College program. If you do not currently own Holsteins but would like to contribute to the Send a Holstein to College effort, we will help you identify a breeder or an auction where you can buy a Holstein to donate. To nominate an animal for the program or learn more, visit www. smartholstein.com. Nomination forms are due December 1, 2021. The SmartHolstein Lab has been established as an easy- to-access demonstration and development farm to explore new technologies designed to collect novel phenotypic traits including wearable or indwelling sensors and milk-based biomarkers. A major emphasis will be placed on practical use of data for on-farm decision making. This herd will also be a nucleus herd for genetic selection strategies and collection of novel phenotypic information. “I want to congratulate Western Kentucky University and Holstein Association USA on this incredible ag tech partnership,” said Kentucky’s Commissioner of Agriculture Dr. Ryan Quarles. “As Chair of the Kentucky Agricultural Development Board, I speak for all our board members when I say we all believe strongly in the importance of cutting-edge research to the future of the agriculture industry. Projects such as the WKU SmartHolstein Lab will help us innovate our way to the next generation of Kentucky agriculture. The Kentucky Agricultural Development Board is proud to support this initiative.” Collaborations and partnerships from established and startup dairy technology and data providers are welcomed and essential for the success of this project. Many industry partners have already donated technologies to this endeavor. The WKU SmartHolstein Lab is a place where partners can come to explore new opportunities with an experienced team of dairy analytics leaders. Industry partnerships may come in the form of donation of expertise, technologies, or graduate student stipends. Mutually beneficial collaborations with other university faculty members, international visitors and scientists, and non-profits are also welcome. Please contact us at wkudairy@smartholstein.com with questions or expressions of interest. You can learn more about the WKU SmartHolstein Lab at www.smartholstein.com or by following SmartHolstein on Facebook or Instagram.
  15. 15. Send a Holstein to College You are invited to participate in the next generation of holstein breed research! Let’s showcase quality kentucky holstein genetics! To build the nucleus herd, we are asking for contributions to this project by donating an animal or embryo. • Contribute to genetic, technology, and data research and development • Support dairy education and youth efforts, allowing students to work with your genetics. • Receive permanent on-site recognition. • Receive a picture of your cow fully decked out with the latest sensors. • Follow research your cow is involved in on social media. • Visit anytime to see the latest technology. • If you don't currently own Holsteins but would like to contribute to the Send a Holstein to College effort, we will help you identify a breeder or an auction where you can buy a Holstein to donate. Please submit the form below by December 1, 2021. For animals or embryos to be donated to the Western Kentucky Universsity SmartHolstein Lab, a collaborative effort between Holsstein Association USA and Western Kentucky University • Please submit the form below by December 1, 2021. At that point, central collection points will be determined for the animals for transportation. Animals should arrive by December 31, 2021. • To be considered, animals must be under three years of age, genomic tested, and free of haplotypes impacting fertility. • Genetic preferences: cows >2500TPI®, heifers >2600TPI®, female sexed embryo Parent Average >2700 TPI®. Other unique contributions will also be accepted. Contact: wkudairy@smartholstein.com, (270) 401-8822, 4660 Nashville Road, Bowling Green, KY 42101 FARM CONTACT NAME NAME AND PREFIX OF FARM HOLSTEIN ASSOCIATION USA ACCOUNT NUMBER ADDRESS PHONE EMAIL
  16. 16. July - August 2021 • KDDC • Page 16 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Dairy Business Innovation Initiative (DBII) is an effort supported by the USDA Agricultural Marketing Service focusing on Value-Added Dairy Businesses in Kentucky, Tennessee, and North Carolina. Prospective and current value-added dairy businesses in Kentucky, Tennessee, and North Carolina are now eligible to submit applications for funding through the Dairy Business Innovation Initiative (DBII). Dairy businesses in the three states that develop, produce, market, or distribute dairy products are now eligible to apply. Applicants will have the opportunity to submit project proposals for up to $500,000 from now until October 1, 2021. Application, eligibility information, frequently asked questions, supporting application documents, and more can be found at the DBII website. If interested in applying or have any questions, please contact j.hickersonkddc@gmail.com or 859-516-2458. KDDC’s consultants will help with any questions you may have to help in your process of submitting an application. Link to the 2021 grant portal is below and can be found on KDDC’s website www.kydairy.org under the value-added tab also. https://utdairy.tennessee.edu/value-added-dairy-grant-application/
  17. 17. July - August 2021 • KDDC • Page 17 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund KY MILK MATTERS ADVERTISING RATES Ad Size BW/C (1x) BW/C (3x) BW/C (6x) Full Page $400/$450 $380/$428 $360/$405 1/2 Page $300/$350 $285/$333 $270/$315 1/4 Page $200/$250 $190/$238 $180/$225 Business Card $100/$125 $95/$119 $90/$113 AD SIZE SPECIFICATIONS Full page (bleed)........................................................................................................................................................................................8.75 x 11.25 Full page (no bleed).........................................................................................................................................................................................7.5 x 10 Half page (horizontal)...............................................................................................................................................................................7.5 x 4.875 Half page (vertical)................................................................................................................................................................................3.625 x 4.875 Business Card............................................................................................................................................................................................3.625 x 2.3 N O T I C E Dairy Consultant Position Vacancy Kentucky Dairy Development Council (KDDC) is seeking qualified applicants for the position of Central Region Dairy Consultant. Please visit our website www.kydairy.org for more information and full job description. To be considered, each applicant should submit a resume and cover letter to KDDC President, Freeman Brundige at fhbrundige@gmail.com. Applications are being accepted until September 30, 2021. If you have questions, please contact Freeman Brundige at 731-446-6248 or H.H. Barlow at 859-516-1129. Thank you
  18. 18. July - August 2021 • KDDC • Page 18 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Wildcat Wisdom Donna Amaral-Phillips UK Dairy Extension Group Career Opportunities for You and Your Family E veryone involved directly or indirectly in the dairy industry over the past couple of years has definitely felt the effects of the on-going economical rollercoaster. Price volatility of milk, feed, and other inputs along with changing or exiting markets has definitely presented many challenges. Strategies to survive this economic rollercoaster have been the topic of many articles in all of the national or regional popular press magazines, newspapers, and newsletters, KY Dairy Notes and here in Milk Matters. While these articles have provided sound advice and strategies for managing the cattle side of a quickly evolving dairy business, they have not addressed or discussed the choices available to expand, maintain, or change one’s source of family or personal income in light of this price volatility. Contemplating one’s chosen career and future opportunities is natural and should be considered the most important decision one can make. These family discussions and personal decisions can be very difficult, but are a must no matter the economic climate of the industry. Future Direction- Make It Your Choice! With all the recent price volatility, questioning one’s future role in this rapidly changing industry would not be surprising and should be considered normal. Many may decide they want to continue their current involvement in the dairy industry without making any changes as they have the markets and capital to continue currently. Others may seriously want to consider changes or additional income options to improve their personal income. By thinking through the pros and cons of various options, one can make a decision as to what you want to do next. One key driving factor behind your final decision needs to be what is important and enjoyable to you and what is best for you and your family. Hopefully, expectations from others will not drive your final decision and they will champion your decision no matter the course it takes. With all of the financial and personal challenges over the past couple of years, one’s positive outlook for the industry has more than likely been tested at times. By looking for positive and personally rewarding experiences, one can have a more positive outlook for our chosen profession. Sometimes this can come in the form of adding a new technology or simple, lower cost updates to facilities making the day-to-day management and chores more enjoyable and productive. Setting small attainable goals and measuring progress toward these goals also can help one maintain a positive outlook for not only its owners, but also employees. Examples that quickly come to mind are improving pregnancy rates by 2% (i.e. increasing pregnancy rate from 16 to 18%) or decreasing SCC by 25,000 in the next 3 to 6 months. Sometimes a planned and attainable challenge can help one have a more positive outlook or acceptance toward those aspects we have little control over. Additional Income Streams Historically, diversifying a farming enterprise was one way farmers used to spread the financial risk over multiple enterprises (i.e. tobacco, grain), utilize unallocated labor, land, and other available resources not assigned to the dairy cows, and potentially provided additional family income. Over the years, use of this approach has decreased as markets have changed along with the realization that the cows often took a back seat, especially during certain times of the year, and cattle performance often suffered. To replace this lost income, dairy farmers classically added cows and management time was devoted solely to the cows instead of a multitude of enterprises. More recently, this diversification approach has regained favor as income margins have been squeezed. The key before adding any additional enterprise is to pencil out if your new enterprises (i.e. raising Holstein steers) is profitable, fits within your available labor and management skills and you have a sound market for the crop/animal in the end. Some of us can remember the ostrich/emu craze where early on those producing breeder stock made money, but those financial rewards did not last for long. Besides the more classical diversification approaches (i.e bedding plants, steers), some close to population centers have added agrotourism or farm tours for those wanting to learn more about where their food comes from as an additional income stream Removing the “Middle Man” US dairy farmers receive 51% of the retail price for a gallon of whole milk and only 14% of a carton of ice cream (USDA lists the retail size as a half gallon, but I haven’t seen half gallons in my retail store for years!). These disparities in sharing the proceeds have driven many to consider processing their own milk and retaining this potential income for themselves. Many have successfully developed businesses that market their own milk as either cheese, bottled milk,
  19. 19. July - August 2021 • KDDC • Page 19 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund ice cream, or all of those listed. Some are located close to a population base or natural market (i.e. Little League ball field), providing a close clientele base. Besides hard work and financial backing for these endeavors, successful local processors point to the fact that they have a person, either in the operation or hired, that markets and promotes their product(s) locally and regionally. Many hours are spent continuously promoting their products and the dairy experience to consumers, chefs, or product buyers. In addition, one person is generally responsible for the processing and others concentrate on the care of the cows Pivot in a Different Direction For some, following an entirely different career path may be the best option for them and their family. This career path may involve retiring, pursuing an occupation not agriculturally related, or transitioning to another agricultural enterprise. Any of these choices depend on one’s interest, assets/resources, and financial position. Hopefully, this decision is one you can make and are not forced to make quickly. Any of these possibilities requires planning especially to navigate the legal and financial implications, such as tax liability. Hiring a lawyer and tax accountant to help you navigate through the implications of your choice may be money well spent and help you avoid various pitfalls. For many, making the choice to change direction and “not milk cows” is very daunting. This is especially true for those who have enjoyed working with cows and those involved in the industry. One must remember you as a dairy farmer have many skills. You understand and know how to work hard and smart, multi-task, manage dynamic and ever changing businesses, and can repair anything that breaks. These are qualities that employers and family always will appreciate and embrace, if this is the direction you chose. You will always have a soft spot for dairy cattle and get that pit in your stomach when it does or does not rain at the inappropriate time. Choice is Yours At the end of the day, making a reasonable personal income is why we are involved in a business, not just for the way of life. One must remember that many avenues are available for one to make a living or options to increase or maintain an income stream. Each situation is unique and the same choice will not work for all. The key is to consider the various options available to you and choose the one or ones that are best for you and your family. Thinking about a change should be considered a normal part of life. You may decide to stay the course at this time, add additional forms of income, or to retire or change careers. Change can be hard, but sometimes it is best for those involved. The key is that you do what you perceive is right for you and your family. The decision is yours and hopefully, those around you will champion your decision no matter what course you decide. How Do Cows ‘Talk’ Cows tell stories with their facial expressions C ows do communicate how they are feeling with their facial expressions. Research in the Journal of Applied Animal Behavioral Science and guidance from Alltech Corporation state facial expressions provide early indications of pain, and include: Eyes: Dull, staring eyes; eye crusting; and sunken eyes are indications of illness and/or pain. Facial muscles: Tension in the muscles above the eyes, along the side of the face and/or above the nostrils may pro- duce “furrow” lines that indicate pain. Nose: Cows that pull back, have dilated nos- trils and show increased tension in the lips may be in pain. Ears: Cows in pain may hold their ears consistently back. Head position: Carrying their heads at or below the withers could be a signal of cows in distress. Reading the telltale signs of early pain can allow for more proactive interventions, which can impact animal well-being, milk production and reproductive efficiency. By Maureen Hansen Caution: Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. Description: POLYMAST® is a broad-spectrum agent which provides bactericidal activity against a wide range of common Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. It is derived from 6-aminopenicillanic acid and is chemically related to ampicillin. Each 10 mL disposable syringe contains hetacillin potassium equivalentto62.5mgampicillinactivityinastablepeanutoilgel. This product was manufactured by a non-sterilizing process. Storage: Do not store above 25°C (77°F). Do not freeze. Action: Hetacillin provides bactericidal levels of the active antibiotic, ampicillin. Invitro studies have demonstrated susceptibility of the following organisms to ampicillin: Streptococcusagalactiae,Streptococcusdysgalactiae, Staphylococcusaureus and Escherichiacoli. Indications: For the treatment of acute, chronic or subclinical bovine mastitis. POLYMAST for intramammary infusion should be used at the first signs of inflammation or at the first indication of any alteration in the milk. Subclinical infections should be treated immediately upon determining, by C.M.T.orothertests,thattheleukocytecountiselevated,orthata susceptible pathogen has been cultured from the milk. POLYMAST for intramammary infusion has been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of mastitis in lactating cows caused by susceptible strains of Streptococcusagalactiae,Streptococcus dysgalactiae,Staphylococcusaureus and Escherichiacoli. Polycillin (ampicillin) SusceptibilityTest Discs, 10 mcg, should be used to estimate the invitro susceptibility of bacteria to hetacillin. Dosage and Administration: Infuse the entire contents of one syringe (10 mL) into each infected quarter. Repeat at 24-hour intervals until a maximum of three treatments has been given. If definite improvement is not noted within 48 hours after treatment, the causal organism should be further investigated. Wash the udder and teats thoroughly with warm water containing a suitable dairy antiseptic and dry, preferably using individual paper towels. Carefully scrub the teat end and orifice with 70% alcohol, using a separate swab for each teat. Allow to dry. POLYMAST is packaged with the Opti-Sert® protective cap. ForPartialInsertion:Twistoffupperportionofthe OPTI-SERT protective cap to expose 3–4 mm of the syringe tip. For Full Insertion: Remove protective cap to expose the full length of the syringe tip. Insert syringe tip into the teat canal and expel the entire contents of one syringe into each infected quarter.Withdraw the syringe and gently massage the quarter to distribute the medication. Do not infuse contents of the mastitis syringe into the teat canal if the OPTI-SERT protective cap is broken or damaged. Residue Warnings: 1. Milk that has been taken from animals during treatment and for 72 hours (6 milkings) after the latest treatment must not be used for food. 2.Treated animals must not be slaughtered for food until 10 days after the latest treatment. Precautions:Becauseitisaderivativeof6-aminopenicillanicacid, POLYMASThasthepotentialforproducingallergicreactions.Such reactionsarerare;however,shouldtheyoccur,treatmentshouldbe discontinuedandthesubjecttreatedwithantihistamines,pressor amines,suchasepinephrineorcorticosteroids. The drug does not resist destruction by penicillinase and, hence, is not effective against strains of staphylococcus resistant to penicillin G. How Supplied: POLYMAST intramammary infusion is supplied as 10 mL syringes containing 62.5 mg ampicillin activity per syringe. One display carton contains 12 syringes. One pail contains 144 syringes. NDC0010-4722-01-10mLsyringe;NDC0010-4722-02-12syringes; NDC0010-4722-03-144syringes. Made in Italy Manufactured for: Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. St. Joseph, MO 64506 U.S.A. 51716297 472206-00 NADA 055-054, Approved by FDA PolyMast® (hetacillin potassium) Intramammary Infusion For lactating cows only NADA 055-058, Approved by FDA Dry-Clox® (cloxacillin benzathine) Intramammary Infusion FOR USE IN DRY COWS ONLY Caution: Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. Action: In the non-lactating mammary gland, Dry-Clox® (cloxacillin benzathine) provides bactericidal levels of the active antibiotic, cloxacillin, for a prolonged period of time. This prolonged activity is due to the low solubility of the cloxacillin benzathine and to the slow-release oil-gel base. This prolonged contact between the antibiotic and the pathogenic organism enhances the probability of a bacteriological cure. Cloxacillinisnotdestroyedbytheenzymepenicillinase, andtherefore,isactiveagainstpenicillin-resistant strainsofStaphylococcusaureus.Itisalsoactive againstnon-penicillinase-producingStaphylococcus aureusaswellasStreptococcusagalactiae. The class disc, methicillin 5 mcg, should be used to estimatetheinvitrosusceptibilityofbacteriatocloxacillin. Indications: For the treatment of mastitis in dairy cows during the dry period. DRY-CLOXhasbeenshownbyextensiveclinicalstudiesto beefficaciousinthetreatmentofmastitisindrycows,when causedbyStreptococcusagalactiaeandStaphylococcus aureus,includingpenicillin-resistantstrains. TreatmentofthedrycowwithDRY-CLOXisindicatedin anycowknowntoharboranyoftheseorganismsinthe udderatdryingoff,orwhichhashadrepeatedattacksof mastitisduringthepreviouslactation,orisaffectedwith mastitisatdryingoff,ifcausedbysusceptibleorganisms. Dosage for Dry Cows: Infuse the contents of one syringe (10 mL) into each quarter following the last milking. See Directions for Use. DirectionsforUse:DRY-CLOX(cloxacillinbenzathine)is foruseindrycowsonly.Administerimmediatelyafterthe lastmilking.Usenolaterthan30 dayspriortocalving. Completely milk out all four quarters. The udder and teats should be thoroughly washed with warm water containing a suitable dairy antiseptic and dried, preferably using individual paper towels. Carefully scrub the teat end and orifice with 70% alcohol, using a separate swab for each teat. Allow to dry. DRY-CLOXispackagedwiththeOpti-Sert® ProtectiveCap. ForPartialInsertion:TwistoffupperportionoftheOpti-Sert ProtectiveCaptoexpose3–4 mmofthesyringetip. For Full Insertion: Remove protective cap to expose the full length of the syringe tip. Insert syringe tip into the teat canal and expel the entire contents of syringe into the quarter. Withdraw the syringe and gently massage the quarter to distribute the medication. Donotinfusecontentsofthemastitissyringeintotheteat canaliftheOpti-SertProtectiveCapisbrokenordamaged. Precautions: Because it is a derivative of 6-aminopenicillanic acid, DRY-CLOX has the potential for producing allergic reactions. Such reactions are rare; however, should they occur, the subject should be treated with antihistamines or pressor amines, such as epinephrine. Residue Warnings: 1. For use in dry cows only. 2. Not to be used within 30 days of calving. 3. Any animal infused with this product must not be slaughtered for food until 30 days after the latest infusion. Made in Italy. Manufactured for: Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. St. Joseph, MO 64506 U.S.A. DRY-CLOX® isaregisteredtrademarkofBoehringerIngelheimAnimalHealthUSAInc. POLYMAST® isaregisteredtrademarkofBoehringerInngelheimVetmedicaGmbH,used underlicense.Allothermarksarethepropertyoftheirrespectiveowners.©2021Boehringer IngelheimAnimalHealthUSAInc.,Duluth,GA.AllRightsReserved.US-BOV-0031-2021 0-BITOM_DryClox_Polymst_PI_4.375x9.625_k6.indd 1 0-BITOM_DryClox_Polymst_PI_4.375x9.625_k6.indd 1 1/27/21 3:53 PM 1/27/21 3:53 PM How Do Cows ‘Talk’ Cows tell stories with their facial expressions C ows do communicate how they are feeling with their facial expressions. Research in the Journal of Applied Animal Behavioral Science and guidance from Alltech Corporation state facial expressions provide early indications of pain, and include: Eyes: Dull, staring eyes; eye crusting; and sunken eyes are indications of illness and/or pain. Facial muscles: Tension in the muscles above the eyes, along the side of the face and/or above the nostrils may pro- duce “furrow” lines that indicate pain. Nose: Cows that pull back, have dilated nos- trils and show increased tension in the lips may be in pain. Ears: Cows in pain may hold their ears consistently back. Head position: Carrying their heads at or below the withers could be a signal of cows in distress. Reading the telltale signs of early pain can allow for more proactive interventions, which can impact animal well-being, milk production and reproductive efficiency. By Maureen Hansen o use by or on the order trum agent which e range of common a. It is derived from related to ampicillin. tacillin potassium stablepeanutoilgel. terilizing process. Do not freeze. vels of the active demonstrated o ampicillin: galactiae, ute, chronic or T for intramammary f inflammation or he milk. Subclinical upon determining, by ntiselevated,orthata om the milk. been shown to be actating cows caused actiae,Streptococcus cherichiacoli. scs, 10 mcg, should be of bacteria to hetacillin. he entire contents of arter. Repeat at 24-hour ments has been given. n 48 hours after further investigated. warm water containing bly using individual and orifice with 70% at. Allow to dry. ® protective cap. ortionofthe OPTI-SERT ringe tip. ap to expose the full xpel the entire contents Withdraw the syringe ute the medication. nge into the teat canal if damaged. has been taken from 2 hours (6 milkings) be used for food. ghtered for food ent. 6-aminopenicillanicacid, llergicreactions.Such ur,treatmentshouldbe ntihistamines,pressor ds. nicillinase and, hence, occus resistant to ary infusion is supplied mpicillin activity per yringes. One pail 10-4722-02-12syringes; nc. 1/27/21 3:53 PM 1/27/21 3:53 PM How Do Cows ‘Talk’ Cows tell stories with their facial expressions C ows do communicate how they are feeling with their facial expressions. Research in the Journal of Applied Animal Behavioral Science and guidance from Alltech Corporation state facial expressions provide early indications of pain, and include: Eyes: Dull, staring eyes; eye crusting; and sunken eyes are indications of illness and/or pain. Facial muscles: Tension in the muscles above the eyes, along the side of the face and/or above the nostrils may pro- duce “furrow” lines that indicate pain. Nose: Cows that pull back, have dilated nos- trils and show increased tension in the lips may be in pain. Ears: Cows in pain may hold their ears consistently back. Head position: Carrying their heads at or below the withers could be a signal of cows in distress. Reading the telltale signs of early pain can allow for more proactive interventions, which can impact animal well-being, milk production and reproductive efficiency. By Maureen Hansen Caution: Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. Description: POLYMAST® is a broad-spectrum agent which provides bactericidal activity against a wide range of common Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. It is derived from 6-aminopenicillanic acid and is chemically related to ampicillin. Each 10 mL disposable syringe contains hetacillin potassium equivalentto62.5mgampicillinactivityinastablepeanutoilgel. This product was manufactured by a non-sterilizing process. Storage: Do not store above 25°C (77°F). Do not freeze. Action: Hetacillin provides bactericidal levels of the active antibiotic, ampicillin. Invitro studies have demonstrated susceptibility of the following organisms to ampicillin: Streptococcusagalactiae,Streptococcusdysgalactiae, Staphylococcusaureus and Escherichiacoli. Indications: For the treatment of acute, chronic or subclinical bovine mastitis. POLYMAST for intramammary infusion should be used at the first signs of inflammation or at the first indication of any alteration in the milk. Subclinical infections should be treated immediately upon determining, by C.M.T.orothertests,thattheleukocytecountiselevated,orthata susceptible pathogen has been cultured from the milk. POLYMAST for intramammary infusion has been shown to be efficacious in the treatment of mastitis in lactating cows caused by susceptible strains of Streptococcusagalactiae,Streptococcus dysgalactiae,Staphylococcusaureus and Escherichiacoli. Polycillin (ampicillin) SusceptibilityTest Discs, 10 mcg, should be used to estimate the invitro susceptibility of bacteria to hetacillin. Dosage and Administration: Infuse the entire contents of one syringe (10 mL) into each infected quarter. Repeat at 24-hour intervals until a maximum of three treatments has been given. If definite improvement is not noted within 48 hours after treatment, the causal organism should be further investigated. Wash the udder and teats thoroughly with warm water containing a suitable dairy antiseptic and dry, preferably using individual paper towels. Carefully scrub the teat end and orifice with 70% alcohol, using a separate swab for each teat. Allow to dry. POLYMAST is packaged with the Opti-Sert® protective cap. ForPartialInsertion:Twistoffupperportionofthe OPTI-SERT protective cap to expose 3–4 mm of the syringe tip. For Full Insertion: Remove protective cap to expose the full length of the syringe tip. Insert syringe tip into the teat canal and expel the entire contents of one syringe into each infected quarter.Withdraw the syringe and gently massage the quarter to distribute the medication. Do not infuse contents of the mastitis syringe into the teat canal if the OPTI-SERT protective cap is broken or damaged. Residue Warnings: 1. Milk that has been taken from animals during treatment and for 72 hours (6 milkings) after the latest treatment must not be used for food. 2.Treated animals must not be slaughtered for food until 10 days after the latest treatment. Precautions:Becauseitisaderivativeof6-aminopenicillanicacid, POLYMASThasthepotentialforproducingallergicreactions.Such reactionsarerare;however,shouldtheyoccur,treatmentshouldbe discontinuedandthesubjecttreatedwithantihistamines,pressor amines,suchasepinephrineorcorticosteroids. The drug does not resist destruction by penicillinase and, hence, is not effective against strains of staphylococcus resistant to penicillin G. How Supplied: POLYMAST intramammary infusion is supplied as 10 mL syringes containing 62.5 mg ampicillin activity per syringe. One display carton contains 12 syringes. One pail contains 144 syringes. NDC0010-4722-01-10mLsyringe;NDC0010-4722-02-12syringes; NDC0010-4722-03-144syringes. Made in Italy Manufactured for: Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. St. Joseph, MO 64506 U.S.A. 51716297 472206-00 NADA 055-054, Approved by FDA PolyMast® (hetacillin potassium) Intramammary Infusion For lactating cows only NADA 055-058, Approved by FDA Dry-Clox® (cloxacillin benzathine) Intramammary Infusion FOR USE IN DRY COWS ONLY Caution: Federal law restricts this drug to use by or on the order of a licensed veterinarian. Action: In the non-lactating mammary gland, Dry-Clox® (cloxacillin benzathine) provides bactericidal levels of the active antibiotic, cloxacillin, for a prolonged period of time. This prolonged activity is due to the low solubility of the cloxacillin benzathine and to the slow-release oil-gel base. This prolonged contact between the antibiotic and the pathogenic organism enhances the probability of a bacteriological cure. Cloxacillinisnotdestroyedbytheenzymepenicillinase, andtherefore,isactiveagainstpenicillin-resistant strainsofStaphylococcusaureus.Itisalsoactive againstnon-penicillinase-producingStaphylococcus aureusaswellasStreptococcusagalactiae. The class disc, methicillin 5 mcg, should be used to estimatetheinvitrosusceptibilityofbacteriatocloxacillin. Indications: For the treatment of mastitis in dairy cows during the dry period. DRY-CLOXhasbeenshownbyextensiveclinicalstudiesto beefficaciousinthetreatmentofmastitisindrycows,when causedbyStreptococcusagalactiaeandStaphylococcus aureus,includingpenicillin-resistantstrains. TreatmentofthedrycowwithDRY-CLOXisindicatedin anycowknowntoharboranyoftheseorganismsinthe udderatdryingoff,orwhichhashadrepeatedattacksof mastitisduringthepreviouslactation,orisaffectedwith mastitisatdryingoff,ifcausedbysusceptibleorganisms. Dosage for Dry Cows: Infuse the contents of one syringe (10 mL) into each quarter following the last milking. See Directions for Use. DirectionsforUse:DRY-CLOX(cloxacillinbenzathine)is foruseindrycowsonly.Administerimmediatelyafterthe lastmilking.Usenolaterthan30 dayspriortocalving. Completely milk out all four quarters. The udder and teats should be thoroughly washed with warm water containing a suitable dairy antiseptic and dried, preferably using individual paper towels. Carefully scrub the teat end and orifice with 70% alcohol, using a separate swab for each teat. Allow to dry. DRY-CLOXispackagedwiththeOpti-Sert® ProtectiveCap. ForPartialInsertion:TwistoffupperportionoftheOpti-Sert ProtectiveCaptoexpose3–4 mmofthesyringetip. For Full Insertion: Remove protective cap to expose the full length of the syringe tip. Insert syringe tip into the teat canal and expel the entire contents of syringe into the quarter. Withdraw the syringe and gently massage the quarter to distribute the medication. Donotinfusecontentsofthemastitissyringeintotheteat canaliftheOpti-SertProtectiveCapisbrokenordamaged. Precautions: Because it is a derivative of 6-aminopenicillanic acid, DRY-CLOX has the potential for producing allergic reactions. Such reactions are rare; however, should they occur, the subject should be treated with antihistamines or pressor amines, such as epinephrine. Residue Warnings: 1. For use in dry cows only. 2. Not to be used within 30 days of calving. 3. Any animal infused with this product must not be slaughtered for food until 30 days after the latest infusion. Made in Italy. Manufactured for: Boehringer Ingelheim Vetmedica, Inc. St. Joseph, MO 64506 U.S.A. DRY-CLOX® isaregisteredtrademarkofBoehringerIngelheimAnimalHealthUSAInc. POLYMAST® isaregisteredtrademarkofBoehringerInngelheimVetmedicaGmbH,used underlicense.Allothermarksarethepropertyoftheirrespectiveowners.©2021Boehringer IngelheimAnimalHealthUSAInc.,Duluth,GA.AllRightsReserved.US-BOV-0031-2021 Maureen Hansen Farm Journal, 2021
  20. 20. • I D E A L B E E F O N D A I R Y G E N E T I C S • H y b r i d v i g o r a n d c o m p l e n t a r y a d v a n t a g e s o f A n g u s a n d S i m m e n t a l u s i n g S i m A n g u s s i r e s • • T h e H O L S i m i n d e x e m p h a s i z e s : o C a l v i n g e a s e o M u s c l e c o n f i r m a t i o n o G r a d i n g a b i l i t y o C a r c a s s l e n g t h • O n l y h o m o z y g o u s p o l l e d a n d b l a c k b u l l s r a n k i n g t h e h i g h e s t f o r t h i s p r o f i t a n d s c i e n c e b a s e d i n d e x a r e e l i g i b l e t o s i r e H O L S i m c a l v e s MA XIMIZIN G R EVEN U E F OR YOU R B EEF ON DAI RY The Holstein USA/KDDC program’s objective is: to provide additional revenue to dairy producers through the production of value-added terminal calves; and to offer a consistent supply of high- quality calves better situated to capture market premiums; and to eliver mating solutions to dairy farmers who include beef sires in their breeding program. HOLSim sired calves should enhance the profit potential and predictability of BeefXDairy approach. HOLSim sired calves should reduce the risk to buyers and feedlots thus, with time and data, enhance the value of such calves. Adding a steady profit stream to commercial dairy producers. We are looking for pilot farms to participate in this program, using HOLSim sires and marketing animals locally. Contact Jeffrey Bewley at jbewley@holstein.com or 270-401- 8822 to learn more. www.holsteinusa.com/holsim 1 Holstein Place, PO Box 808, Bratleboro, VT 05302-0808 Tel 800.952.5200 Kentucky HOLSim Pilot Project: Premium Branded Beef For Your Dairy
  21. 21. July - August 2021 • KDDC • Page 21 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Southland Dairy Farmers Continue to Support the Kentucky Special Olympics with Cool Dairy Treats S pecial Olympics Kentucky celebrated its 25th year in 2019, and Southland Dairy Farmers was excited to celebrate with the athletes, coaches and families at the Kentucky games, held at the Richmond campus of Eastern Kentucky University. The summer games are the largest event of the year and over 1,400 athletes competed in five sports that spread out from May 31 – June 2. The Summer Games began with Opening Ceremonies early on May 31 at the Capitol Rotunda in Frankfort. The Final Leg of the Law Enforcement Torch Run Final leg concluded in Richmond. Southland Dairy Farmers were there showing their support and passing out ice cream sandwiches for all that attended. The Special Olympics Kentucky Summer Games are made possible through sponsorship support. Southland Dairy Farmers is proud to be part of such a worthwhile cause and promoting milk and the dairy industry.
  22. 22. July - August 2021 • KDDC • Page 22 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Educating On the Importance of Milk in Schools The 2021 Kentucky State Nutrition Association Conference was held virtually for the first time this summer. The Dairy Alliance made the most of the online meeting and had a strong presence during the conference through the promotion of available online trainings for how to move milk in schools. The Dairy Alliance promoted dairy optimization programs like Moo Brew, Cocoa Moo, Smooth & Smart, and Farm to School options. Both the Dairy Good for You, Good for the Planet and Strive for 35! with Alternative Feeding trainings were offered to the approximately 300 attendees and continue to be available for attendees to access throughout the year. The Dairy Alliance Grants Continue to Impact Kentucky’s Food Banks In 2018, God’s Pantry Food Bank in Lexington, KY, partnered with The Dairy Alliance to launch a Milk2MyPlate pilot program, a grant program designed to aid in funding for obtaining refrigeration for dairy products. The food bank originally planned to move 60 gallons of milk per week in Fayette County after acquiring seven milk coolers to place in its food pantries. By 2019, however, the program provided approximately 5,500 gallons of milk per week across the 50 counties served by God's Pantry, representing 5.9% of the food bank's total distribution volume that year. Though Milk2MyPlate has grown through an expanded governmental milk distribution and private relationships, The Dairy Alliance grant has allowed an increase in overall volume. Now, God's Pantry allows partner agencies to receive as much milk as they can safely handle without fees or the need to order ahead, ensuring the milk clients receive is always fresh and distributed quickly and efficiently . Foil Fencer Kiefer Promotes Milk Throughout Summer In honor of June’s National Dairy Month and World Milk Day, native Kentuckian and foil fencer Lee Kiefer, a two-time Olympian, five-time NCAA Champion, and dairy advocate, posted to her Instagram stories that engaged her followers in milk trivia, highlighting milk's performance fueling nutrients. Lee also shared a video, "13 Ways to Hit: In Celebration of the 13 Performance Fueling Nutrients of Milk," showcasing 13 fencing moves for each essential nutrient in milk. Off social media, the Team Milk athlete promoted milk in several interviews leading up to her third time representing Team USA at the Olympic Games. These are just a few recent examples of how over the last 2 years, Kiefer’s partnership with The Dairy Alliance has provided numerous opportunities to share milk’s important role in an athlete’s diet.
  23. 23. July - August 2021 • KDDC • Page 23 KDDC is supported in part by a grant from the Kentucky Agricultural Development Fund Allied Sponsors PLATINUM AgCentral Alltech Bel Cheese Bluegrass Dairy & Food Burkmann Feeds Cowherd Equipment CPC Commodities Kentucky Department of Agriculture Kentucky Farm Bureau Kentucky Soybean Board Prairie Farms Shaker Equipment Sales GOLD Farm Credit Services Givens & Houchins Inc. Mid-South Dairy Records Owen Transport Select Sires Mid-America SILVER Day and Day Feed Givens & Houchins Inc. Grain Processing Corporation KAEB Services Kentucky Veterinary Medical Association Luttrull Feed Nutra Blend Owen Transport South Central Bank Southwest Dairy Museum BRONZE Bagdad Rolling Mills Bank of Jamestown Central Farmers Supply Hartland Animal Hospital Kentucky Corn Growers Association Limestone & Cooper Mammoth Cave Dairy Auction QMI Quality Mgt Inc. Nutra Blend Wilson Trucking Special Thanks to Our Sponsors
  24. 24. 176 Pasadena Drive Lexington, KY 40503 859.516.1129 ph www.kydairy.org Non-Profit US Postage PAID AUG 17 Kentucky State Fair Dairy Products Judging, West Wing AUG 19-29 Kentucky State Fair, Louisville, KY AUG 19 Commodity Breakfast, Commodity Tent, Kentucky State Fair, 7:00 AM AUG 19-21 4-H and Open Dairy Cattle Shows AUG 20 Annual KY State Fair Junior Dairy Cheese Auction, West Wing State Fair, 2 AUG 26 Kentucky Farm Bureau Country Ham Breakfast, South Wing State Fair SEP 09 CPC Fall Field, Fountain Run, KY 9:00 A.M. C.T. SEP 16 KDDC Board Meeting, Barren Co. Extension Office, 10:00 A.M. C.T. SEP 28-OCT 1 KDDC Young Dairy Producers Bus Tour, World Dairy Expo. Madison, WI OCT 12-14 Kentucky Milk Quality Conference, Dale Hollow State Park Resort, Burksville,KY NOV 05-09 North American International Livestock Show, KY Fair and Exposition Center NOV 18 KDDC Board Meeting, Adair Co. Extension Office. 10:00 AM C.T. Calendar of Events

Kentucky Dairy Development Council

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