D of h mapping report edited

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D of h mapping report edited

  1. 1. A Report on the Mapping of Training for Carers (Edited) Produced for The Princess Royal Trust for Carers, at the request of the Department of Health March 2006 by Dr. Malcolm Clarke, Headway Consultancy Services Ltd. & Stuart Riley, The Research Engine
  2. 2. Contents Page Introduction, context and methodology 3 Results of the questionnaire 4 Telephone discussions 15 Summary 17 Appendix A – The questionnaire 18 2
  3. 3. Introduction, context and methodology used In early March 2006 we were asked by The Princess Royal Trust for Carers to undertake a ‘mapping’ exercise of the existing provision of ‘training’ for carers. This work had been requested by the Department of Health in connection with the Government’s commitment in the health and social care White Paper, “Our health, our care, our say”, published in January this year, to “allocate specific funding for the creation of an Expert Carers Programme. Similar to the EPP (Expert Patients Programme) this will provide training for carers to develop the skills they need to take greater control over their own health, and the health of those in their care”. For the purposes of this exercise, we have taken “training” to mean training in the knowledge or skills necessary to undertake the caring role in its broad sense and to maintain the carer’s health to do so. It does not, however, include activities such as pampering, leisure activities or short breaks, which, although they are very valuable and appreciated, are not directly related to those knowledge and skills. It is, however, appreciated that this distinction may not always be completely clear-cut. The timescale for completing the work, by the beginning of April, was extremely short which limited the methodological options available. It was not feasible to undertake a postal questionnaire. However, we had the benefit of access to the email database of Carers Week which includes about 2500 contacts of organisations and which should include a very high proportion of organisations involved with the provision of services to and support for carers. It was therefore decided to email everyone on that list to ask them to complete an internet-based questionnaire which we set up on a dedicated web location. The Carers Week list was supplemented by emails sent to national organisations known to be active in this field. Completion of the questionnaire took about 5-10 minutes, depending on how much information respondents had to give. The objectives of the questionnaire were to identify those organisations who are currently providing training for carers; the nature of that training, both in terms of its method of delivery and target group, and the views of the respondents on how best to provide training for carers in the context of an Expert Carers Programme. The questionnaire is reproduced in Appendix A. 3
  4. 4. Results of the questionnaire Do you provide training for carers? Number % Yes 176 66 No 90 34 Total: 266 Approximately two-thirds of those who responded do provide training at present. Do you provide or commission this with any other organisations? Number % Yes 138 80 No 35 20 Total: 173 Four out of five of those who do provide training, do so in collaboration with other organisations. Each respondent was asked to indicate the organisations involved in the collaboration, including their own. The organisations specified are shown below. Number % Local carers organisation 88 25 Local authority 84 24 NHS body 75 21 Local non-statutory charity/organisation(excluding national carers organisations) 59 17 National carers organisation 23 7 National non-statutory charity/organisation(excluding national carers organisations) 22 6 Total number of respondents: 138 The numbers relate to the 138 organisations that provide training in collaboration with others. The %s shown are the proportions of all 'collaborations' mentioned which come into each category It will be seen that Local Authorities, the NHS and local non-statutory organisations are the major partners in such collaborations. The types of training undertaken by the 176 organisations are: Meetings with a trainer 157 Written training material 117 On-line training 16 It will be seen that on-line training is still in its relative infancy compared with the more traditional types of training. Although 117 organisations also said that they provide ‘other types’ of training, an examination of the original returns reveals that when asked to specify these, the majority of responses described the subject matter of training, rather than a different method of its delivery. However, there were some 4
  5. 5. examples of different types of delivery, or at least, variations on a type. These included: Residential weekends or courses Conferences One to one work Whole family work Group work/workshops Cost to the carer of training Very few organisations make a charge to the carers. Specifically, only 5 charge for meetings with a trainer; 0 for on-line training; only 2 for written material and only 5 for other types of training. At which carers is training targeted? Number % All carers 120 69 Specific groups 53 31 Total: 173 Two-thirds of the training is targeted at all carers, with the other third being targeted at specific groups, as follows. Number % Carers of people with mental illness 31 28 Carers of people who are old and frail (Including Alzheimer’s) 20 18 Carers of people with physical disability 11 10 Carers of people with chronic physical illness or disease 11 10 Carers of people with terminal illnesses 11 10 Carers of people with learning disabilities 10 9 Carers of people with drug or alcohol problems 5 5 Other 10 9 Total number of respondents: 53 The largest group who are mentioned for targeted training are the carers of people with a mental illness, followed by carers of people who are old and frail. When asked if this training could be adapted to other groups of carers, 69% of respondents (37) said that it could be, with the remainder saying that it couldn’t. The reasons given for the responses of the latter group were largely due to the content being specific in relation to the needs of the particular group targeted. The decisions as to what training can appropriately be provided generically, and what should be targeted towards specific groups of carers will, of course, be a key issue in the construction of an Expert Carers Programme. 5
  6. 6. Which areas does training cover? Number % Carer's own health 128 9 Moving and handling 111 8 Carers' rights 111 8 Available services and support 110 8 Clinical information about the management of the condition of the cared-for person 93 7 Financial or benefit matters 93 7 Carers assessment rights/policy and legislation affecting carers 92 7 Alternative, complementary therapies 87 6 Advocacy/assertiveness 86 6 First Aid 77 5 Legal issues (including power of attorney, legislation affecting carers 67 5 Computer/IT skills 62 4 Aids/adaptations 51 4 Home safety (including fire safety) 45 3 Community involvement skills 45 3 Food hygiene, meal planning 43 3 Employment matters 38 3 Writing/numeracy skills 25 2 Other 50 4 Total number of respondents: 172 Each respondent was asked to identify the categories of training with which they are involved. The %s shown are the proportions of all training identified which come into each category. It will be seen that training in a wide range of topics is offered, with Carer’s health, which as stated above was specifically identified in the White Paper, coming out top of the list. This is followed by a group of three very close together, namely Moving and Handling, available services and support, and carers’ rights. The next category is clinical information about the management of the condition of the cared for person, which, again, is specifically mentioned in the White Paper. There then follows a range of other relevant topics. The ‘other’ category included various answers, some of which could have been included in the categories given. Among the interesting topics on the list were: Stress management (arguably an aspect of the carers own health) How to complain Person-centred planning 6
  7. 7. Which training has its content and outcomes based on a researched and validated base? Number % of Number % of content training outcome training validated validated Carers' rights 67 60 28 25 Writing/numeracy skills 14 56 10 40 Moving and handling 62 56 29 26 Carers assessment rights/policy and legislation affecting carers 50 54 22 24 Legal issues (including power of attorney, legislation affecting carers 36 54 16 24 Food hygiene, meal planning 23 53 17 40 Financial or benefit matters 49 53 16 17 First Aid 39 51 20 26 Employment matters 19 50 14 37 Clinical information about the management of the condition of the cared-for person 46 49 26 28 Community involvement skills 22 49 15 33 Computer/IT skills 30 48 17 27 Carer's own health 59 46 29 23 Available services and support 49 45 24 22 Home safety (including fire safety) 19 42 10 22 Aids/adaptations 21 41 8 16 Alternative, complementary therapies 33 38 19 22 Advocacy/assertiveness 28 33 17 20 Other 13 26 7 14 Total: 115 61 The table lists the responses in order of proportion of training which had its content based on a researched and validated base. There are considerably higher proportions for the content than the outcomes, and the proportions on the outcome scores in particular should be treated with some caution due to low absolute numbers. It is possible that some respondents did not fully understand the question, particularly with respect to outcomes. It could be argued that these figures for content which are all in the 30% - 60% range are lower than might be expected and for some areas it might be expected that any training delivered should be so based. Thus for example, it is surprising that only 49% of training on clinical information about the management of the cared-for person is, apparently, based on a researched and validated base. One might expect that topic to be very close to the top of the list. Looking at the relative rankings on the content and outcome scores, categories with a particularly higher outcome ranking are computer/IT skills; community involvement; employment; and clinical information. Categories with a higher content ranking are financial/benefit matters in particular; carers’ rights; and carers’ assessment rights and 7
  8. 8. legal issues. It can be seen that the outcomes of these may be more difficult to assess, and the first has a confidentiality element. Respondents were asked to give details of the research or validation on which their training is based. In most cases the responses referred to the fact that the training is provided by professionals within the relevant area of expertise who have the appropriate qualifications to do so. Is the training evaluated by the participating carers themselves? 161 of the 170 respondents, who answered this question, did so in the affirmative. Are carers involved in the planning of the training? Number % Yes 131 79 No 35 21 Total: 166 The large majority of organisations do involve carers in the planning of the training, although the proportion is perhaps no more than one would expect. The questionnaire then moved on to ask for respondents views on a possible Expert Carers Programme. If an Expert Carers Programme is implemented what do you think should be in the core training programme? This was an ‘open ended’ question. Many of the responses identified many of the areas which are listed in Question 31, and a significant number said that these are the key areas. We undertook an analysis of the responses using a linguistic analysis programme which identifies words which occur with particular frequency beyond that of normal English usage. This revealed the following possible training areas as appearing with particular frequency:- 8
  9. 9. Training aimed at supporting the carer in their caring role Moving and handling Carer’s rights Coping with stress/coping strategies Services for carers Information for carers Communication skills Looking after yourself Advocacy Training aimed at improving caring skills First Aid Medication In addition, there were four particular concepts which had not been fully covered in the questionnaire which merit a mention:- 1. The desirability of asking the carers themselves what types of training they think should be included; 2. Dealing with the changed relationship with the cared-for person; 3. The concept of the carer exercising choice about the amount of caring which is undertaken, and how that might be enabled and dealt with.; and 4. Drawing from the Expert Patients Programme the concept of carers themselves doing the training, and being trained as trainers. What additional areas would be suitable for inclusion in an advanced programme? Some respondents were unclear as to what was meant here. Did it mean more in-depth coverage of topics which were included in the core programme, or, alternatively, additional topics? We actually meant the latter, but the responses have raised a relevant issue about whether there is scope for two levels of training on particular topics. Many respondents repeated many of the areas identified for the core programme. The linguistic analysis did not throw up any significant new areas appearing very frequently which had not appeared in the previous analysis. However, there were some specific ideas which merit a special mention. These are Training aimed at supporting the carer in their caring role The effect of caring on other relationships of the carer Bereavement counselling Training for life after caring Influencing local decision-making/influencing public perception/acting as a carers representative Starting/running a local carers group 9
  10. 10. Training aimed at improving caring skills Palliative care Which key disability and medical condition specific issues would need to be incorporated? Number % People who are old and frail (including Alzheimer’s) 203 14 People with mental illness 199 14 People with chronic physical illness or disease 195 14 People with physical disability 192 14 People with terminal illnesses 192 14 People with learning disabilities 186 13 People with drug or alcohol problems 168 12 Other 81 6 Total number of respondents: 232 Each respondent was asked to identify all the key issues which they would like to see included. The %s shown are the proportions of all issues identified which come into each category. The table shows relatively little variation between the different categories. In other words, there were all seen as important for inclusion. Such variation as there is may just reflect the variation in the numbers of organisations of different types responding. Respondents were asked to specify the ‘other’ category. Most of these were more specific conditions which come into one of the pre-defined categories. Some responses identified other issues such as: The transition to adult services for children with disabilities Parent carers Young carers Would an Expert Carers Programme be suitable for young carers? A large majority of respondents answered this in the affirmative. Number % Yes 194 85 No 35 15 Total: 229 Respondents were asked to amplify their response to this question. Two different points of principle were expressed. A small number of respondents expressed the view that young people should not have to be carers, and that therefore this role should not be legitimised by ‘training’. Conversely, a larger number felt that young carers are carers like other carers and should have the same access to support and training. 10
  11. 11. Some respondents felt that whilst an expert carers programme would be suitable for young carers, their special circumstances and needs are such that it would not be appropriate to simply provide the same programme to them as is provided for other carers. They felt that the content of the programme should be adapted for young carers and, in many cases, that the method of delivery would be different. What type of training would be most suited to an Expert Carers Programme? Respondents were asked to score each type of training on the following scale, and a score was allocated as indicated Completely suitable – 5; Highly suitable – 4; Suitable – 3; Neutral – 2; Unsuitable – 1 Training: Score: Meetings or courses with a trainer 4.15 One-to-one training in the carers own home 3.66 One-to-one training in another place 3.32 Written material 3.15 On-line training 2.82 The results in the table shows that the ‘traditional’ type of training with a trainer is still regarded as the most suitable for carers, even more than training in the carers own home, with on-line being regarded as the least suitable. Are certain types of training particularly suitable for specific groups of carers? Number % Yes 174 72 No 69 28 Total: 243 It will be seen from the table that almost three-quarters of respondents feel that certain types of training are particularly suitable for specific groups of carers, suggesting that a ‘one size fits all’ model might not be appropriate. 11
  12. 12. Which types of training are suitable for specific groups? This question asked respondents to indicate which of 4 types of training (meetings/courses; on-line; written material; one to one) is suitable for the following types of carer: Carers of people with physical disability Carers of people with mental illness Young carers Carers of people who are old and frail (including Alzheimer’s) Carers of people with learning disabilities Carers of people with drug or alcohol problems Carers of people with terminal illnesses Carers of people with chronic physical illness or disease. Number answering Number % one to one to meetings written one meetings written one /courses on-line material training /courses on-line material training mental illness 424 132 90 90 112 31 21 21 26 young carers 408 131 109 74 94 32 27 18 23 old and frail (Including Alzheimer’s) 383 121 64 86 112 32 17 22 29 learning disabilities 382 133 74 85 90 35 19 22 24 physical disability 381 114 78 87 102 30 20 23 27 drug or alcohol problems 380 126 75 83 96 33 20 22 25 terminal illnesses 369 90 65 86 128 24 18 23 35 chronic physical illness or disease 363 109 71 83 100 30 20 23 28 Total: 3090 956 626 674 834 31 20 22 27 It will be seen from the table that, overall, the relative rankings are Meetings and courses – 31 % One to One - 27% Written material – 22% On-line – 20 % Within the different categories of carer, there is however a different picture. Respondents thought that for carers of people with a physical disability, written material training would be marginally more suitable. For carers of people with mental illness, alcohol/drug problems and chronic illness the position closely mirrors the 12
  13. 13. overall average. For young carers on-line training was considered more suitable than average, with written material and one to one less suitable. For carers of the old and frail, on-line training was less popular than average. For carers of people with learning disabilities, meetings and courses were considered more appropriate and one to one training less so. For those caring for terminal illness, one to one training was considerably above the average, and meetings/courses considerably below it. In considering these figures, it should however be remembered that, although these relative variations exist, meetings and courses scored the highest in every category, except for carers of people with a terminal illness. How should an Expert Carer's programme be publicised? Respondents were asked to score different methods of publicity, and the following scores were allocated. Very effective – 5; Effective – 4; Neutral – 3; Ineffective – 2; Very ineffective - 1 Publicity: Score: Mailing list of known carers 4.46 Through other professional (GPs, social workers etc) 4.22 Posters in carers centres 3.97 Newspaper/radio advertising 3.95 Posters in GP surgeries 3.84 Posters in public buildings 3.58 Other 4.01 The table shows that mailing lists to known carers and through other professional were the two categories which had a mean score above 4. The ‘others’ contained a range of suggestions. Two related common ones were through existing carers groups or organisations and by word of mouth. Others mentioned libraries, supermarkets, religious groups, GP surgeries by other methods than posters, pharmacies, hospitals, post offices, schools and voluntary organisations. 13
  14. 14. Which organisations are suited to provide carers training? Respondents marked the suitability of different types of organisation which were scored as follows Very suitable – 5; suitable – 4; Slightly suitable – 3; Neutral – 2; Not suitable - 1 Organisation type: Score: Local carers organisation 4.67 National carers organisation 4.24 NHS 3.90 Local non-statutory charity (excluding carers organisations) 3.85 Local Authority 3.81 National non-statutory charity (excluding carers organisations) 3.52 The mean scores obtained (above) show that specialist carers organisations were considered most suitable, although all the scores are quite high. Which places would be suitable for an Expert Carer’s programme to be delivered? Number % Carers Centres 239 18 Voluntary organisations' premises 225 17 Community buildings e.g. village halls, community centres 224 17 Carer's own homes 182 14 Other Health Centres 180 14 GP's surgeries 144 11 Public Authority offices 96 7 Other 39 3 Total number of respondents: 251 Each respondent was asked to identify which places they think would be suitable. The %s shown are the proportions of all places identified which come into each category. Respondents could tick as many as they thought appropriate. The results show that Carers Centres or other voluntary organisations or community buildings are considered the most suitable. Respondents who ticked ‘other’ identified schools and colleges as the main category not included in the list. They also identified day centres. A number said that what matters is the accessibility of the building, not its primary use. 14
  15. 15. Telephone discussions A small number of telephone discussions were held with selected respondents to explore particular issues and experiences which emerged from the individual responses which appeared interesting and relevant. These were not in any sense representative but do highlight some of the key issues as perceived by those already working in this area. Cares Sandwell have used lottery and other funding to undertake adult learning programmes for carers in three basic categories: leisure learning; developing caring skills and developing skills and schemes for employment. This work has been evaluated by the local Learning & Skills Council and we have been provided with a copy of their comprehensive report. It postulated a possible model containing the following elements: Care Learning – in 4 categories: health and medical; legal and benefits; emotional; advocacy and support. Basic skills and personal development, including access to IT and access to voluntary and community activity. Transitions – Personal reviews of qualifications and experience; brokerage with learning and training providers; employment options, including transitional support; community options and advocacy. Thus, this approach links the skills for caring with other skills and training, and other options for using those skills. Middlesborough Council (Adult Services for Learning Disabilities and Mental Health) think that an ECP programme presents exciting opportunities but raise some specific issues. They believe that carers should be treated as “already experts”, who know more about it than the statutory agencies and have often been doing it for the life of the cared-for person. It will be resented if it appears that this is not recognised. It should be part of a changed attitude to carers aimed at empowering them – acknowledging and supporting their expertise. Training should be geared to the individual situation and suggested the concept of appraisal and personal development plans for carers, analogous to the approach adopted for professional staff. A one size fits all model would not be appropriate Manchester Carers Forum have very recently launched the on-line City and Guilds Learning for Living Programme, in conjunction with Adult Education and Crossroads. This is an accredited programme, leading to a qualification, for carers existing skills. It is aimed at helping carers who want a role outside or after their caring role, which the Forum sees as important. Considering the point made by colleagues at Middlesborough, the Forum recognises that many carers who have been doing it for years are experts but also point out that many carers are thrown unexpectedly into the role, don’t know what it means and are 15
  16. 16. expected to “hit the ground running”. We wouldn’t expect professional staff to assume such a role without preparation and training, and shouldn’t do so for carers. In extreme cases there may even be a safety issue in doing so. In this context it is important that discharge planning should fully involve carers. The Forum supports the use of existing carers giving training and using their expertise in this process. The Head of Young Carers development at The Princess Royal Trust for Carers suggests that a programme for young carers might be given a more child friendly name which does not suggest that young carers might be encouraged to embed themselves in the caring roles. The emphasis should be on harm minimisation, reducing the impact of caring roles and moving into independent adulthood. Most of the core topics which have been identified for adults are also relevant to young carers including moving & handling, coping with stress, information for carers, First Aid, communication skills and looking after yourself. However, there are some differences – approaches to advocacy and carers’ rights should be different for young carers, services for carers should focus on generic sources of support for children, and young carers should not be encouraged to develop skills in medication. The following is also considered particularly relevant for young carers:- 1. The need for any programme to have a substantial element of fun; 2. Moving on from caring should be a core topic for young carers; 3. The desirability of asking young carers themselves about what should be included; 5. Support for accreditation of caring skills e.g through the Youth Achievement Award; 6. The value of peer support; and 7. Group work can be a very effective delivery method for working with young carers. 16
  17. 17. Summary Despite the speed with which it has been undertaken, the exercise has produced some valuable and informative results from those who are currently delivering training for carers and others working with carers. The different situations of carers should be recognised. Some have been caring for the whole life of the cared-for person and are already experts. Others may be thrown unexpectedly into a caring role for which they are unprepared. Carers themselves should be involved in the decision about the content and delivery style of any programmes. It may be helpful to distinguish different types of training e.g training for the caring role itself and training in other skills, some of which may be useful to help carers move on from the caring role. There may also be much value in accrediting the skills which carers have as carers. “Carers” should not be seen as an homogenous group. There are great differences in carers’ needs, based on their personal situations, and the longevity and nature of the caring need. This should affect both the content and delivery style of training provided. The special circumstances of young carers, in particular, should be recognised. 17
  18. 18. Appendix A Training Provision for Carers March, 2006 For the purposes of this questionnaire, by "training" we mean provision which is aimed at improving the skills and/or knowledge of carers, in undertaking their roles as carers and/or in managing their own health. We do not mean the provision of pampering, leisure activities, respite support and other activities which, while being valuable in the support they give to carers, are not designed to improve their knowledge and skills. The time you spend filling in this questionnaire will be time well-spent in improving the support available to carers. Thank you for doing so. Q1 Name of responding organisation Q2 Address Q3 Post Code Q4 E-mail address Q5 Telephone number Q6 Name of the Chief Officer Q7 Name of the person to contact about this questionnaire if different from above Q8 Does your organisation provide or commission any training for carers to develop their skills in and knowledge about their caring role? Yes Go to Q9 No Go to Q35 Q9 Do you provide or commission this in partnership or collaboration with any other organisation ? Yes Go to Q10 No Go to Q11 18
  19. 19. Q10 Please indicate below the types of organisation involved in this partnership/collaboration, including your own Local carers organisation National carers organisation Local authority NHS body Local non-statutory charity/organisation (excluding carers organisation) National non-statutory charity/organisation (excluding carers organisation) Q11 Do you offer meetings or courses with a trainer? Yes Go to Q12 No Go to Q14 Q12 Is this training free for the carers? Yes Go to Q14 No Go to Q13 Q13 Please give an indication of the charges you make to the carers Q14 Do you offer on-line training? Yes Go to Q15 No Go to Q17 Q15 Is this training free for the carers? Yes Go to Q17 No Go to Q16 Q16 Please give an indication of the charges you make to the carers Q17 Do you offer written training material? Yes Go to Q18 No Go to Q20 Q18 Is it free for the carers? Yes Go to Q20 No Go to Q19 Q19 Please give an indication of the charges you make to the carers 19
  20. 20. Q20 Do you offer other types of training? Yes Go to Q21 No Go to Q24 Q21 What type of training is this? Q22 Is it free for the carers? Yes Go to Q24 No Go to Q23 Q23 Please give an indication of the charges you make to the carers Q24 Is the training that you offer targeted at all carers or specific groups of carers? All carers Go to Q28 Specific groups Go to Q25 Q25 Which groups is your training targeted towards? Carers of people with physical disability Carers of people with chronic physical illness or disease Carers of people who are old and frail (Including Alzheimers) Carers of people with learning disabilities Carers of people with mental illness Carers of people with drug or alcohol problems Carers of people with terminal illnesses Other Please specify "Other" Q26 Could the training that you offer be adapted to other groups of carers? Yes Go to Q28 No Go to Q27 Q27 Why do you say it couldn't be adapted? 20
  21. 21. Q28 Which of the following areas does your training cover? Moving and handling Legal issues (including power of attorney, legislation affecting carers Clinical information about the management of the condition of the cared-for person Advocacy/assertiveness Financial or benefit matters Aids/adaptations Employment matters Home safety (including fire safety) Available services and support Computer/IT skills Carers' rights Writing/numeracy skills Carer's own health Alternative, complementary therapies First Aid Food hygiene, meal planning Carers assessment rights/policy and legislation Community involvement skills affecting carers Other Q28a Please specify "Other" Q29 In which of the areas you mentioned in Q28 above, has the content of your training been based on a researched and validated base? Moving and handling Legal issues (including power of attorney, legislation affecting carers Clinical information about the management of the condition of the cared-for person Advocacy/assertiveness Financial or benefit matters Aids/adaptations Employment matters Home safety (including fire safety) Available services and support Computer/IT skills Carers' rights Writing/numeracy skills Carer's own health Alternative, complementary therapies First Aid Food hygiene, meal planning Carers assessment rights/policy and legislation Community involvement skills affecting carers Other Q29a Please specify "other" Q30 Please give details of the research or validation 21
  22. 22. Q31 In which of the areas you mentioned in Q29 above, have the outcomes of your training been based on a researched and validated base? Moving and handling Legal issues (including power of attorney, legislation affecting carers Clinical information about the management of the condition of the cared-for person Advocacy/assertiveness Financial or benefit matters Aids/adaptations Employment matters Home safety (including fire safety) Available services and support Computer/IT skills Carers' rights Writing/numeracy skills Carer's own health Alternative, complementary therapies First Aid Food hygiene, meal planning Carers assessment rights/policy and legislation Community involvement skills affecting carers Other Please specify "Other" Q32 Please give details of the research or validation Q33 Is your training evaluated by the participating carers themselves? Yes No Q34 Are carers involved in the planning of the training? Yes No Q35 If an Expert Carers Programme is implemented what do you think should be in the core training programme? 22
  23. 23. Q36 What additional areas would be suitable for inclusion in an advanced training programme? Q37 Which key disability and medical condition specific issues would need to be incorporated? people with physical disability people with chronic physical illness or disease people who are old and frail (Including Alzheimers) people with learning disabilities people with mental illness people with drug or alcohol problems people with terminal illnesses other Q37a Please specify "other" Q38 Do you think an Expert Carers Programme would be suitable for young carers? Yes No Q39 Why do you say that? Q40 What types do you think would be most suitable for an Expert Carers Programme? Completely Highly suitable suitable Suitable Neutral Unsuitable meetings or courses with a trainer one-to-one training in the carers own home one-to-one training in another place on-line training written material Q41 Do you think that certain training types are particularly suitable for specific groups of carers? Yes Go to Q42 No Go to Q43 23
  24. 24. Q42 Which types of training do you think are suitable for specific groups? Please tick the relevant boxes one to one meetings, courses on-line written material training Carers of people with physical disability Carers of people with chronic physical illness or disease Carers of people who are old and frail (Including Alzheimers) Carers of people with learning disabilities Carers of people with mental illness Carers of people with drug or alcohol problems Carers of people with terminal illnesses Young carers Q43 How do you think an Expert Carers Programme should be publicised? Please use the scales below to indicate, from your experience, the likely effectiveness of the listed forms of publicity Very Very effective Effective Neutral Ineffective ineffective mailing list of known carers posters in carers centres posters in GP's surgeries posters in public buildings through other professionals (GPs, social workers etc.) newspaper/radio advertising other Q44 Please say what you mean by "other" Q45 Which organisations are suited to providing carers training? Slightly Very suitable Suitable suitable Neutral Not suitable Local carers organisation National carers organisation Local authority NHS body Local non-statutory charity/organisation (excluding carers organisation) National non-statutory charity/organisation (excluding carers organisation) 24
  25. 25. Q46 Which of the following places would be suitable for an Expert Carers Programme be delivered? Tick as many as you think appropriate Carers Centres Voluntary organisations' premises Public Authority offices Carer's own homes GP's surgeries Other Health Centres Community buildings e.g. village halls, community centres Other Q46a Please specify "other" Thank you very much for completing the questionnaire. Your time and effort are greatly appreciated. 25

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