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CANSA Womens Health 2016

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Being Informed is Half the Battle Won

The incidence of breast cancer among South African women is increasing with women having a one in 29 lifetime risk of being diagnosed and the most common cancer in women of all races and ethnicities. With such alarming rates, it places so many women at risk and so we urge all women to go for regular screening and also find ways to lower your cancer risk.

The overall goal of CANSA’s campaign is to improve women’s health and well-being by encouraging women to ensure they have the knowledge to put in place their own risk reduction measures. Through its campaign, CANSA is providing access to information that enables people to make healthy lifestyle choices. CANSA also encourages screening and early detection.
Read more:
http://www.cansa.org.za/being-informed-is-half-the-battle-won/

Published in: Health & Medicine
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CANSA Womens Health 2016

  1. 1. Being informed is half the battle won… Women should keep themselves informed so that they can recognise early warning signs and know how to reduce their risk.
  2. 2. *SA Statistics as per National Cancer Registry (NCR) 2011 Breast and Cervical cancers are the two most common cancers affecting South African women
  3. 3. Warning signs of Breast Cancer • Early breast cancer usually doesn't show symptoms, but as the tumour grows, it can change how the breast looks or feels Typical changes include: • A puckering of the skin of the breast • A lump in the breast or armpit • A change in the skin around the nipple or nipple discharge • Dimpling of the nipple or nipple retraction • An unusual increase in the size of one breast • One breast unusually lower than the other. Nipples at different levels • An enlargement of the glands • An unusual swelling in the armpit Find out more at: http://www.cansa.org.za/breast-cancer-warning-signs-myths-facts/
  4. 4. See the Signs of Breast Cancer
  5. 5. Cervical Cancer - What is HPV? • Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) is a group of more than 100 related viruses • About 40 types are sexually transmitted through genital contact while 2 types (16 + 18) are considered high risk in South Africa and are responsible for cervical cancer • HPVs are transmitted via skin-to-skin contact and body fluids • Some HPVs, such as those that cause common warts that grow on hands and feet, do not spread easily High risk HPV is estimated to cause... • 70% of cervical and anal cancers • 50% of vaginal, vulvar and penile cancers • 20% of head and neck cancers
  6. 6. Risk Factors for Ovarian Cancer • The more children a woman has and the earlier in life she gives birth, the lower her risk for ovarian cancer • Women with a personal history of breast cancer or a family history of breast or ovarian cancer • Women who take oestrogen replacement (not with progesterone) for +5 years • Birth control pills decrease the risk of ovarian cancer • Being infertile or having fertility treatment • Using a coil (intra-uterine device (IUD) • Older women are at highest risk for developing ovarian cancer • The risk of ovarian cancer is slightly higher for women who: – have medical conditions such as endometriosis – smoke tobacco products – are obese – are tall
  7. 7. Risk Factors for Uterine Cancer • Diabetes • Oestrogen replacement therapy without the use of progesterone • History of endometrial polyps • Infertility (inability to become pregnant) • Infrequent periods • Tamoxifen, a drug for breast cancer treatment • Never being pregnant • Obesity • Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) • Starting menstruation at an early age (before age 12) • Starting menopause after age 50
  8. 8. Warning signs
  9. 9. Cancer Warning Signs
  10. 10. Knowledge is like Paint, it only serves a Purpose once Applied Regular Screening is key
  11. 11. Screenings available to women: • Do monthly breast self-examinations (http://www.cansa.org.za/steps-how-to-do-a-breast-self-examination-bse/) • Go for regular Pap smears (a screening test for early diagnosis of cervical cancer) • Go for regular screening (clinical breast examinations) available at 30 CANSA Care Centres countrywide (http://www.cansa.org.za/cansa-care-centres-contact-details/) • Symptom-free women should go for a mammogram every year from age 40 • SureTouch - non-invasive device for safe breast screening (not a diagnostic tool) - available at some CANSA Care Centres • CANSA also has various Mobile Health Clinics which offer screening to people in communities who do not have easy access to health screening (http://www.cansa.org.za/cansa-mobile-health-clinics/)
  12. 12. Cancer screening is available at CANSA’s Mobile Health Clinics, Care Centres and Clinics country-wide All participating members of the Radiological Society of SA (RSSA) and the Breast Imaging Society of SA (BISSA) are offering a 10 % or more discount on mammograms and breast MRI, not paid for by medical aid schemes, during the month of Oct and first half of Nov 2016 See list of participating members on http://www.cansa.org.za/files/2016/09/RSSA- Participating-Radiological-Practices-2016.pdf or contact the RSSA on 011 794 4395, e-mail radsoc@iafrica.com or visit www.rssa.co.za.
  13. 13. What is CANSA doing to help? • CANSA has Mobile Health Clinics that travel to remote areas throughout South Africa to reach people who would otherwise not have access to screening • These include breast examinations, Pap smear screening tests for cervical cancer, as well as other health tests such as cholesterol • CANSA is playing an active part in the process of influencing and amending the South African Patent law, that will result in more affordable medication for cancer patients.
  14. 14. Just remember... Find out from your health practitioner or CANSA Care Centre or Clinic what you can do to reduce your risk Be physically active, don’t be overweight and limit your red meat and alcohol intake You can reduce your risk for breast cancer by adopting a balanced lifestyle and avoiding environmental carcinogens (cancer causing substances) It is possible to develop cancer without any risk factors being present
  15. 15. Watch our videos Archbishop Emeritus Desmond Tutu has a message for you: https://youtu.be/CTeis0HRXXk CANSA Care and Support: https://youtu.be/swNltOAZSwE CANSA Screening: https://youtu.be/Hfq5z3MtSz4 CANSA Care and Support Survivors' Diaries: https://youtu.be/MrfjOkJluP4
  16. 16. Help CANSA expand its cancer screening programmes, please consider making a donation at any of our CANSA Care Centres and Clinics country-wide or Online at http://www.cansa.org.za/personal-donation-options/ or use SnapScan on your mobile phone
  17. 17. Contact us… • Call us toll-free on 0800 22 66 22, or email info@cansa.org.za • Please Like our CANSA national Facebook page: CANSA The Cancer Association of South Africa • If you are a Survivor, please join our Facebook group in support of cancer survivors: Champions of Hope - CANSA Survivors • If you are a Caregiver, please join our Facebook group in support of cancer caregivers: CANSA Caring for the Carers • Follow us on Twitter: @CANSA • Follow us on Instagram: @CancerAssociationOfSouthAfrica • Follow us on Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/cansa/ • View our videos on YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/user/can1000sa
  18. 18. Disclaimer: Whilst the Cancer Association of South Africa (CANSA) has taken every precaution in compiling this presentation, neither it, nor any contributor(s) to this presentation can be held responsible for any action (or the lack thereof) taken by any person or organisation wherever they shall be based, as a result, direct or otherwise, of information contained in, or accessed through, this presentation.

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