Make It Work!Building the Capacity of CBOs & HDsImplementing Interventions in African              American Communities   ...
Harm Reduction Coalition   Founded in 1994 to work with individuals and communities at    risk for HIV infection due to d...
HRC Programs & Services   Policy Advocacy      Lifting the Federal Funding Ban on Needle Exchange   National and Region...
Objectives of RoundtableDiscussion   To increase participants’ awareness about the    successes and challenges faced by a...
IntroductionIn order for a comprehensive HIV prevention planto be successful, community basedorganizations and their front...
BackgroundIn 2004, the CDC funded variousorganizations to provide capacity buildingassistance (CBA) in four areas:     (1...
What is CBA?               7
Capacity Building Assistance (CBA)     HIV prevention capacity building is a process     by which individuals, organizatio...
Capacity Building Assistance (CBA)  Capacity building involves a variety of    delivery mechanisms:      1)   technology t...
Overview of AACBIIn 2004, the Harm Reduction Coalition (HRC)   received a 5-year grant from the CDC to be a   Focus Area 2...
Goals of AACBI   To strengthen the capacity of community based    organizations and health departments to develop and    ...
Examples of AACBI CBAServices   Adaptation, implementation, quality assurance, and    evaluation of effective HIV prevent...
AACBI Team   Camille A. Abrahams, Program Director   Jagadisa-devasri Dacus, Senior Director of Training and Capacity   ...
Lessons LearnedAfrican American Capacity Building             Initiative                                     14
Methodology   Formal/informal interviews with AACBI staff   Interviews and focus groups with CBA    consumers   Review ...
Lesson #1:A team-based approach helps to  ensure effective and efficient       service delivery                           ...
Lesson #2:The CDC’s current CBA request  process may need further        refinement                           17
Lesson #3:Without relationship building and open communication,   CBA will not succeed                                18
Lesson #4:CBA consumers who are proactive,   committed, and have a clear  understanding of their needs become true collabo...
Lesson #5: It is important for organizations toassess their organizational capacity     before seeking to implement       ...
Lesson #6:Understanding the culture and prior        experiences of the CBA consumers is a prerequisite       for successf...
Lesson #7:A coordinated effort among CBA  providers is needed to effect   change on a national level                      ...
Lesson #8:Although the CBA process is notalways smooth, the outcome still       can be a success                          ...
Lesson #9:Staff turnover results in loss of   institutional memory and           momentum                                24
Lesson #10:Short-term CBA successes are documented, but time will tell whether long-term results are           achieved   ...
Lesson #11:  CBA consumers need to feel asense of empowerment to be ableto sustain their programs after the      CBA provi...
Lesson #12:    Flexibility is key,as change is inevitable                          27
Conclusions:Many of the lessons centered on the need for open communication and collaboration between CBA providers, CBA c...
Conclusions:The overarching theme across the lessons learned is that providing capacity building assistance has its reward...
African American Capacity Building Initiative       A Program of the Harm Reduction Coalition       22 West 27th Street, 5...
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Lessons Learned Building The Capacity of African American Organizations

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Make It Work! Building the Capacity of CBOs & HDs Implementing Interventions in African American Communities

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Lessons Learned Building The Capacity of African American Organizations

  1. 1. Make It Work!Building the Capacity of CBOs & HDsImplementing Interventions in African American Communities Camille A. Abrahams, M.S.African American Capacity Building Assistance Initiative a program of the Harm Reduction Coalition 1
  2. 2. Harm Reduction Coalition Founded in 1994 to work with individuals and communities at risk for HIV infection due to drug use and high-risk sexual behaviors. Committed to reducing drug-related harm by initiating and promoting local, regional and national harm reduction education, interventions and community organizing Offer specific expertise in how to best incorporate the principles of health and safety promotion for drug users. 2
  3. 3. HRC Programs & Services Policy Advocacy  Lifting the Federal Funding Ban on Needle Exchange National and Regional Conferences  Next conference: Miami, November 2008 The Institute @HRC  Harm Reduction Training Institute  Hepatitis C Project  Skills and Knowledge on Overdose Prevention (SKOOP)  Anti-Stigma Project  African American Capacity Building Initiative (AACBI) 3
  4. 4. Objectives of RoundtableDiscussion To increase participants’ awareness about the successes and challenges faced by a regional, racial/ ethnic specific model of capacity building assistance (CBA). To increase participants’ awareness of the specific CBA strategies and techniques implemented effectively by AACBI. To encourage dialogue between CBA providers and consumers that result in best practices in the effective provision of CBA services in African American communities. 4
  5. 5. IntroductionIn order for a comprehensive HIV prevention planto be successful, community basedorganizations and their frontline staff musthave the necessary skills and resources torespond efficiently and effectively to thisepidemic.Thus, CBOs must have the capacity to engagesuccessfully in HIV prevention efforts,particularly those efforts involving theimplementation of HIV prevention interventions thathave proven to be effective. 5
  6. 6. BackgroundIn 2004, the CDC funded variousorganizations to provide capacity buildingassistance (CBA) in four areas:  (1) Strengthening Organizational Infrastructure for HIV Prevention  (2) Strengthening Interventions for HIV Prevention  (3) Strengthening Community Access to and Utilization of HIV Prevention Services  (4) Strengthening Community Planning for HIV Prevention For more information, go to http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/topics/cba/cba.htm 6
  7. 7. What is CBA? 7
  8. 8. Capacity Building Assistance (CBA) HIV prevention capacity building is a process by which individuals, organizations, and communities develop abilities to enhance and sustain HIV prevention efforts. The goal of capacity building is to foster self- sufficiency and the self-sustaining ability to improve HIV prevention programs, processes, and outcomes. 8
  9. 9. Capacity Building Assistance (CBA) Capacity building involves a variety of delivery mechanisms: 1) technology transfer 2) technical/capacity-building assistance 3) training 4) skills building 5) information dissemination 9
  10. 10. Overview of AACBIIn 2004, the Harm Reduction Coalition (HRC) received a 5-year grant from the CDC to be a Focus Area 2 CBA Provider for CBOs and health departments (HDs) working with African Americans communities in the North Region.The African American Capacity Building Initiative (AACBI), a program of HRC, is a dynamic initiative aimed at reducing the infection and transmission rates of HIV/AIDS within African American communities. 10
  11. 11. Goals of AACBI To strengthen the capacity of community based organizations and health departments to develop and implement effective HIV prevention interventions To increase the number of persons of African descent who get tested for HIV and who know their serostatus To increase the proportion of HIV infected people of African descent who are linked to appropriate prevention, care and treatment services To decrease the number of people at risk of acquiring or transmitting HIV infection 11
  12. 12. Examples of AACBI CBAServices Adaptation, implementation, quality assurance, and evaluation of effective HIV prevention interventions for high-risk seronegatives and HIV positive individuals. Training on and adaptation of the Safety Counts and VOICES/VOCES Diffusion of Effective Behavioral Interventions (DEBIs). Integrating cultural competence and linguistic appropriateness into HIV prevention intervention activities. 12
  13. 13. AACBI Team Camille A. Abrahams, Program Director Jagadisa-devasri Dacus, Senior Director of Training and Capacity Building Programs (part-time) Dorcey Jones, CBA Specialist Adam Viera, CBA Specialist Velvet Lattimore, Program Assistant (part-time) Dr. Darrell Wheeler, Behavioral and Social Science Consultant Dr. Bernadette Hadden, Evaluation Consultant Angela Coleman, Curriculum Writer Consultant 13 AACBI Regional Consultants
  14. 14. Lessons LearnedAfrican American Capacity Building Initiative 14
  15. 15. Methodology Formal/informal interviews with AACBI staff Interviews and focus groups with CBA consumers Review of case files that included action plans, detailed progress notes, Consumer Satisfaction Surveys, CBA completion forms, and communications between AACBI and CBA consumers 15
  16. 16. Lesson #1:A team-based approach helps to ensure effective and efficient service delivery 16
  17. 17. Lesson #2:The CDC’s current CBA request process may need further refinement 17
  18. 18. Lesson #3:Without relationship building and open communication, CBA will not succeed 18
  19. 19. Lesson #4:CBA consumers who are proactive, committed, and have a clear understanding of their needs become true collaborators in the process 19
  20. 20. Lesson #5: It is important for organizations toassess their organizational capacity before seeking to implement interventions 20
  21. 21. Lesson #6:Understanding the culture and prior experiences of the CBA consumers is a prerequisite for successful work 21
  22. 22. Lesson #7:A coordinated effort among CBA providers is needed to effect change on a national level 22
  23. 23. Lesson #8:Although the CBA process is notalways smooth, the outcome still can be a success 23
  24. 24. Lesson #9:Staff turnover results in loss of institutional memory and momentum 24
  25. 25. Lesson #10:Short-term CBA successes are documented, but time will tell whether long-term results are achieved 25
  26. 26. Lesson #11: CBA consumers need to feel asense of empowerment to be ableto sustain their programs after the CBA provider has left 26
  27. 27. Lesson #12: Flexibility is key,as change is inevitable 27
  28. 28. Conclusions:Many of the lessons centered on the need for open communication and collaboration between CBA providers, CBA consumers, CDC program officers, and CDC program consultants in order to ensure efficient and effective capacity building. 28
  29. 29. Conclusions:The overarching theme across the lessons learned is that providing capacity building assistance has its rewards, but it is not without its challenges. 29
  30. 30. African American Capacity Building Initiative A Program of the Harm Reduction Coalition 22 West 27th Street, 5th Floor New York, New York 10001 Tel: 212-213-6376 Fax: 212-213-6582 Email: aacbihrc@harmreduction.org Website: www.harmreduction.org 30

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