Understanding Exposure
Learn how to achieve perfectly-exposed photos every time.
The Goldilocks Effect
Perfectly exposed photos have
just the right amount of light.
 Under-exposed photos don’t
let in en...
Controlling Exposure
You can control exposure by adjusting:
 ISO – Your camera sensor’s sensitivity to light.
 Aperture ...
Setting ISO
ISO is a number that controls your camera’s light sensitivity.
 The higher the ISO, the higher the camera’s s...
Adjusting Aperture
Aperture (or f-number) governs the lens’ opening in order to
control how much light enters the camera. ...
Shutter Speed
The other part of the exposure equation is shutter speed.
 The lower the available light, the longer you wi...
Using a Light Meter
You can use a light meter in order to
determine which ISO, aperture and
shutter speed settings to use ...
Flash & Flash Compensation
You can always use your flash to provide additional light.
But the flash will often “blow out” ...
Using Exposure Compensation
In addition, you can also use the Exposure Compensation
setting, available on most digital cam...
About Cameta
Cameta Camera is a true
brick-and-mortar camera store
in Amityville, NY. We’ve been
selling photography equip...
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Understanding Exposure: Learn How to Achieve Perfectly-Exposed Photos

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Need a primer on exposure? Check out this deck and learn tips and tricks for getting perfectly-exposed photos every time.

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Understanding Exposure: Learn How to Achieve Perfectly-Exposed Photos

  1. 1. Understanding Exposure Learn how to achieve perfectly-exposed photos every time.
  2. 2. The Goldilocks Effect Perfectly exposed photos have just the right amount of light.  Under-exposed photos don’t let in enough light. This results in photos that are too dark.  Over-exposed photos let in too much light. This results in washed-out images.  Perfectly exposed photos let in just enough light to properly light the scene.
  3. 3. Controlling Exposure You can control exposure by adjusting:  ISO – Your camera sensor’s sensitivity to light.  Aperture – The size of the shutter’s opening (f-number).  Shutter Speed – The time your shutter is open and able to collect information about the scene.
  4. 4. Setting ISO ISO is a number that controls your camera’s light sensitivity.  The higher the ISO, the higher the camera’s sensitivity to light.  The lower the ISO, the lower the camera’s sensitivity to light. But be careful. ISO is tricky. If you increase it too much, your image can quickly become over exposed, resulting in “noise” or grain in the image. Tip: Most DSLRs have guides to help you determine the correct ISO for your light conditions.
  5. 5. Adjusting Aperture Aperture (or f-number) governs the lens’ opening in order to control how much light enters the camera. Depending on your lens, you may not be able to reach the lowest f-number possible. So, if you’re shooting in low light, you may have to adjust for that with longer shutter speeds.
  6. 6. Shutter Speed The other part of the exposure equation is shutter speed.  The lower the available light, the longer you will want to keep your shutter open, to give your camera time to gather the available light.  In this case, you would want a slow shutter speed.  Note: When using slow shutter speed, its best to use a tripod.  In bright light, you will want to keep your shutter speed relatively fast, depending on what you’re trying to capture.
  7. 7. Using a Light Meter You can use a light meter in order to determine which ISO, aperture and shutter speed settings to use at any given time. But light meters are not fool-proof. This is where flash compensation and exposure compensation come in.
  8. 8. Flash & Flash Compensation You can always use your flash to provide additional light. But the flash will often “blow out” or over-expose your image. This is where flash compensation comes in. Flash compensation allows you to dial the effect of the flash up or down after the image has been captured.  To find this setting on your camera, consult your user’s manual.
  9. 9. Using Exposure Compensation In addition, you can also use the Exposure Compensation setting, available on most digital cameras. Exposure Compensation allows you to decrease the exposure when photos are too bright and increase it when photos are too dark.  To find this setting on your camera, consult your user’s manual.
  10. 10. About Cameta Cameta Camera is a true brick-and-mortar camera store in Amityville, NY. We’ve been selling photography equipment and distilling advice to professionals and hobbyists alike more than 25 years. For more photography tips, visit our blog at Cameta.com/blog.

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